I just wanted to share...

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by MiddleRiver, Aug 6, 2008.

  1. MiddleRiver

    MiddleRiver New Member

    343
    0
    0
    My vet was wanting to do blood testing to test my goats for copper levels - and so i gave him a print off of the saanendoah's copper information. Yesterday he calls me and says, great info - i'm gonna look at copper and goats differently :+) I had bought a few calf boulses, but haven't broke them down yet as i don't have smaller caps, or a scale, but he will now do it for me, and now for other goats in our area he has a better understanding for it as well :+)

    I did however pick up a new mineral ( cattle ) that i'm trying, so not sure if i should boulse them yet ? It's got 2200 ppm ?

    Thanks all of you for being here, for me and my vet :+)
     
  2. Chaty

    Chaty New Member

    398
    0
    0
    :handclap I agree and sometimes our vets learn from us and then they know we know what we are talking about. Mine likes it when I show him different things I have learned on here. He even told me it was trial and error for him cause he didnt get that much training in vet school. Great Job!!
     

  3. Bilrite Farms

    Bilrite Farms Guest

    171
    0
    0
    Can you really tell copper levels from blood tests? I thought liver samples were needed?
    Just asking since we went through the whole copper thing here too and honestly, I'm still confused.

    Trisha
     
  4. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    Trisha,

    Blood tests for copper are inaccurate (copper is not stored in the blood). A liver biopsy is the only true and accurate test available.

    Sara
     
  5. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

    9,442
    1
    0
    Don't believe you get a true test with blood Trisha
     
  6. Qvrfullmidwife

    Qvrfullmidwife New Member

    1,008
    0
    0
    I read the post as that her vet wanted to do blood tests ("My vet was wanting to do blood testing") and she educated him to the contrary by giving him the correct info.
     
  7. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

    9,442
    1
    0
    right ! using Saanendoah to educate our VETs is soooo great!
     
  8. MiddleRiver

    MiddleRiver New Member

    343
    0
    0
    Yes, blood testing is not good enough, and thanks to you all, and the saanendoah websites i have now shown that to my vet - and am thrilled that he is such a willing to learn fella :+)
     
  9. Bilrite Farms

    Bilrite Farms Guest

    171
    0
    0
    I didn't think that blood test worked for copper. Glad to know I remembered something correctly.
    I'd like to ask another question... Why copper bolus if liver biopsies haven't been done?
    (or maybe they have been and I missed that too)
     
  10. mill-valley

    mill-valley New Member

    1,045
    0
    0
    Some folks treat based on symptoms because the test is usually done on liver from a dead animal. Since not everyone has a liver available to test. I don't think there are many places that will do biopsies on a live animal.
     
  11. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    Wrong. Many veterinary hospitals at universities will do liver biopsies on live animals. Local vets will not.

    Sara
     
  12. MiddleRiver

    MiddleRiver New Member

    343
    0
    0
    Exactly what mill-valley said - i don't have any dead goats to test, nor any culls yet. I did get a higher copper mineral though, and will try to use that till either i get a cull to butcher, or one dies from something else so i can do a liver bio. Till then i hope this new mineral takes care ( or mostly does ) of my symptoms - if not, we may bolus before testing if i must.

    I just feel very greatful to have a willing vet and you all as a great source of information :+)
     
  13. MiddleRiver

    MiddleRiver New Member

    343
    0
    0
    Blissberry - would you happen to know how much that costs ?
     
  14. Corky

    Corky New Member

    356
    0
    0
    Hey! I just had a brain burp!!!

    Why not get a liver sample when you have a kid butchered for meat and have that tested. It would let you know how that goat was and if it was born on your place and ate the same grain and minerals as the others you would know.
     
  15. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

    3,681
    0
    36
    Just like with blood testing of other minerals. My mom was having terrible palpitations, they were about to drive her crazy, couldn't sleep. They drew blood, said her potassium was normal. So she continued with these awful palpitations. Then she sent in a hair sample for mineral testing, came back SUPER low potassium. Next time she was having a very bad attack of palpitations, heart "skipping" almost every other beat. I mixed up some morton's lite salt which is half salt, half potassium chloride, with water. She drank it and her palpitations stopped with seconds! So now she eats high potassium foods and they are all but gone. When they start in she can take some potassium and they go away. So blood test can be very inaccurate. Why do doctors not know this when they spend billions on the health care industry?
     
  16. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    4
    0
    Corky it would be a start to send in the liver, but a kid hasn't really lived long on your place, hasn't kidded, milked, fathered kids, or been stressed or heavily used. So although it could tell you if you perhaps need to bolus your kids, it really wouldn't tell you much about your most important goats, you bucks and milkers. Vicki
     
  17. Corky

    Corky New Member

    356
    0
    0
    Well DRATS!!!
    I thought I had a brain storm. :/

    It's just like a Friend to shoot you in the foot. Well FINE! :lol

    As I have never bolused before and Molly is now getting her hair back, by the way... I am going to bolus the big goats with at least one bolus.
    I am also treating for mites as Molly is very, very flaky.

    Of course I read on line some of the things it could be and Johns Desease came up and scared me to death but as there are no other goats around them and it has been a closed herd for at least two years My head says it is not that.