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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone ever done a goat milk soap that came out a truly creamy white? (not a pale yellow or tan/ivory shade, but creamy white?
I am tempted to try an unscented one to see what happens- but is there a scent I can use that will get me a white soap? Or does the shade depend more on the combination of oils used?
Any suggestions appreciated!
 

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It's everything....the scent/eo you use, oils, and your process. Some of the ladies here have pretty white soap but mine is not really. My lard soaps are definitely whiter than my veggie ones.
 

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I've gotten some pretty white soaps - the only ones that way of mine have a large amount of lard and coconut. White oils = white bars
But of course there are other factors.

Temp is very important when dealing with GM soaps. Everything is RT for me. If I do a 100% GM soap my GM is in frozen solid cubes and I dump the lye straight on and stir until the cubes are gone - often my solution is very white and pretty cool. If not I mix the lye with and equal weight of water, then add the balance of the liquid as RT or slightly cool GM AFTER adding the Lye/water to the oils.

Then there's the honey or sugar thing - those will heat up and you won't get a white bar.

Then of course there is FO. So Far BRV is the only FO I have used that has vanilla in it that doesn't discolor.

sometimes to stop I gel I put my soap in the Fridge.
 

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Yes. I gel everything too and use milk. I have at least a few that are very white, lavender, pomegranate, lilac, ocean breeze, etc, plus more that I color.
Becky
 

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I just don't believe with the sugars in milk that a 100% goat milk bar can be white. Now with the new way I soap with water melting my lye then adding milk at emulsion, yes the bars are creamy white, as long as they are not dark oil bars, too much shea which gives you a green cast like olive does...or a FO that discolors from vanillia or patchoulli or....Vicki
 

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No. Get your lye and water room temp, then add it to your butters and oils. Stick blend to emulsion, where you oils and butters are no longer oily and opaque, then add your room temp milk...I nuke mine for a few mintues. If you add it cold at this point you could get riceing or accelateration, and too hot it can take away your trace you are starting to get. Vicki
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Vicki- Yesterday I finally tried out your method for making goat milk soap. I must say it was vastly different from how I am used to doing things, but I was very impressed with the results. Now to cut the soap and see what we have!
I didn't do an "all white" soap this time, as my customers seem to go for the colored/swirled varieties more than the plain ones, but I think the white parts of the bar will be lighter and the soap will be smoother and creamier than my original method of pouring the lye over frozen milk. I was amazed at how quickly it traced when I added the milk! I made three batches, each time the temps were in the 84 to 90 degree range (for oils, lye, and milk). Pictured are (top to bottom) Red clover tea, Fresh Mint (blend of spearmint, peppermint, ginger, and eucalyptus eo's), and lilac & lavender.

 

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Just beautiful! I do have one purist who I still make slushy milk soap for so it's 100% goatmilk but she also pays for my time. But I love the new way, you can really crank out the soap like that! And swirling at thick trace is just pretty! Vicki
 
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