How long until mom stops hollering?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by farm mom, Mar 9, 2008.

  1. farm mom

    farm mom New Member

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    Dove, our Nubian/Saanen cross, had twin does yesterday. All went great. We took the babies from mom to bottle feed (I had quite a time of it trying to decide what to do with the babies, leave with mom, bottle feed, etc...) How long will it take for mom to stop standing at the gate and hollering for babies? She is breaking my heart.
     
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    couple days and some does longer :crazy
     

  3. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    Be prepared!! mine hollered for over a month.. well one did anyway. And unless they saw/licked and had time with the kids, they're really hollering for you! You have now become a baby goat, and your "mom" is very upset that your leaving the herd and going into that house! :rofl She will eventually calm down.. in the meantime, you may want to give your neighbors a bit of cheese. :biggrin
     
  4. BlueHeronFarm

    BlueHeronFarm New Member

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    If it makes you feel any better -- it's probably more hormones than it is loss or sadness. The looking for the babies usually stops after 2 days - but the hollering can last beyond that...especially with Nubians. ;)
     
  5. farm mom

    farm mom New Member

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    O.K., I caved and put the babies back in with mom. I did initially let mom lick the babies after birth and spend about an hour with them. I was still undecided if I wanted to raise them fiasco farm style or completely bottle feed. Now, I am regretting put them back in with her. I think I am worse than the goat. Jeez, I need to figure it out. I think I was letting my "mommy thoughts" get in the way too much. If I took them away now am I really going to make the doe go mental?

    Next babies due I am not even going to let mom lick babies. Just whisk them away.
     
  6. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    If you are pulling the kids, never let the doe see her babies. We cover them with a towel if we have to. It is much easier on the doe. I would never let the doe lick her babies and then take them away. JMO.

    Figure out what you are going to do (and stick with it) before your next doe freshens. :D

    Sara
     
  7. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    IMO leave them with mom now and handle them everyday 4 and 5 times a day for friendly kids. But drinking even a drop of mom's milk your ruined as far as CAE free babies anyway so why not leave them on mom.
     
  8. Shykid Acres

    Shykid Acres Guest

    ;) I have an idea. Leave one, bottle feed the other. That way both of you can cuddle a kid. (They are so cute.)Just a thought. I would hate to have the mom yell too. :D

    -Kim
     
  9. farm mom

    farm mom New Member

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    Thanks, they actually are not nursing from mom but are out with her. She has never nursed kids before and was squirming and kicking at them when they tried to nurse but otherwise is very attentive. So, it ended up a good comprimise because we are bottle feeding them and able to heat treat the milk. They look forward to seeing us because we have the food but they seem to know she is "mom." We are keeping an eye closely on things and if she stops being attentive towards them we will just pull them out and seperate.

    Obviously if they were to nurse from mom does not mean an automatic death sentence from CAE, correct? And as a side note, how come if dam, sire, grandparents, etc.. are all CAE free do you still have to do CAE prevention? Can it just pop up after six or seven years of negative tests from the dam and buck?
     
  10. farm mom

    farm mom New Member

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    Well Kim, I thought of that. There is one doe the mom seems to be more attentive too so that may happen. I just hated the one to "grow up" alone without any other goats. We do have another goat kidding in 5 weeks so they will have those babies.
     
  11. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Absolutely no death sentence I was just stating that if you were wanting to sell a doe kid raised on pasturized milk as a CAE preventative then putting them on the dam would nulify that. I have some that are raised on the dams but sell them as dam raised on CAE Negative does
    Problem with CAE testing is that CAE can not show up as positive for many many years sometimes 8 or 9 years so nothing is a certain there. At least I think I am right if someone else knows for certain please say so.
     
  12. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    You are exactly right Sondra.

    Sara
     
  13. Melissa

    Melissa New Member

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    another problem with leaving only one kid on the dam is the possibility for a lopsided udder. not always, mind you, but the chances go up.

    -Melissa
     
  14. homeacremom

    homeacremom New Member

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    I just had to comment on this thread though I may be proven crazy. I pull babies at birth. They never touch the ground, but go straight through my hands to a paper sack until nose and mouth are clear and then into a towel and straight to the plastic tote on the other side of the wall for me to work with. The doe faithfully cleans the paper sack while I take care of the baby. I let her lick the birth fluids off my hands too, so they'll bond with me.
    This means that they holler for me, NOT their babies. I go out and milk them 3-5x a day the first several days. They seem to be quiet for a few hours after milking, so "milking" them that often keeps them fairly quiet all day and at night they seem to settle down well. By the time the milk is in well and all congestion, if any, is past we go to 2x a day and all is quiet (except when milking time is near and I come out of the house :) ) Stimulating the udder helps to satisfy the hormones that make them holler; the strong mothering instincts. I also think the extra stimulation helps build up the milk volume. You know, I carry over what I know about humans to the goats and it often works LOL!
    Now one of the wise old doe gals on here may come by and say something about this plan is not good so I defer to their opinions! Of course what works for me in a small farm setting would hardly be feasible or necessary in a big herd.
     
  15. SherrieC

    SherrieC Active Member

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    tiffany, if you are a closed Homestead only type farm, you have less worry's but if you show, even just 4-h, or bring in new stock, or send yours out for breeding, you then increase the chances of some of your stock contracting CAE from someone else's stock. Add to that the dormancy of the diesease and that's why so many people prefer to pull and prevention raise.