How long from trace?

Discussion in 'Soap Making' started by homeacremom, Sep 4, 2008.

  1. homeacremom

    homeacremom New Member

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    My soap is going from a thin trace (a drop dimpling for just a second) to pudding thick in a couple minutes. Not enough time to color, scent, and still get time for good swirls.
    I changed my recipe from all vegetable to include lard. Also added 5% of a butter. A higher percentage of the solid fats to liquid oils which is giving me harder, creamier bars and a shorter cure time. Is this contributing to my thick trace?
    I've moved to soaping at cooler temps which I thought would give me slower trace. Cooler temps trace slower, correct?
    How long do you take from a thin trace, remove swirl portions, color, go back scent, pour and swirl? (say a 7 lb. batch)
     
  2. Kalne

    Kalne New Member

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    My lard recipe moves much slower than my all veggie and I usually have enough time to do what I want. The FO I use will make a big diff. too. Some just don't give me enough time to do anything more than scent and pour.
     

  3. MRFBarbara

    MRFBarbara Guest

    I personally think with more butters that the hotter the temp, it takes longer to trace.. Stir with a spoon instead of stick blender to slow things down..
    Barbara
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I also think that going all the way to trace is most folks problems.

    If you are doing a simple scent and no swirling, than real trace gives you beautiful iceing peaks, but in no other case is full trace and having pretty soap one in the same.

    By pouring at almost trace (making sure you are near trace....no visible oils, some soap is getting thick and you can't see through the soap on your stick blender etc.) adding scent with a spoon and doing coloring for swirls on unscented soap...simply gives you much more control of the finished product.

    If adding lard is giving you less time to trace, heat it up some. Or don't cool your lye off soo much. I prefer to soap quickly especially when dealing with large batches that make my arm tired stirring even with the stick blender...but I am also very organized and keep everything in a line, so from start to finish it runs smoothly and fast.

    Also when moving your recipe or using new scent you also should move back up to more liquid, it's no time to be discounting liquid. Vicki
     
  5. homeacremom

    homeacremom New Member

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    Yup, to many changes at once- changing the recipe, moving to room temp, discounting, new scent, and a double swirl... less than brilliant. :blush2 and my MM is sticking... but I bet my soap from here on out is going to be great AND beautiful. :D