How long for new goat to be back up to previous milking amounts?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by doulanobles, Jun 29, 2008.

  1. doulanobles

    doulanobles Guest

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    We bought a new milk doe last week (Thanks jennie!). She was milking a gallon a day at Jennie's place. When I milked her there, it was about 6 pounds on her scale. I don't have a scale here yet, but she is giving me about 1.5 to 1.75 quarts per milking right now.

    I know there is a period of adjustment so I'm not worried yet, just curious as to how long I should expect it to take to get back up there?

    Jennie sent me some of her feed and I've been gradually transitioning her to our oats and BOSS on the stand and alfalfa hay 2x/day.

    My other 2 does (who are getting sold/given away SOON) are pretty rough on her and unless I lock her up by herself fo an hour or so, she can't eat her hay withlout serious harrasment.

    They're on 4-5 acres of browse and pasture, free access to baking soda, minerals, fresh water, etc.

    Thanks all!
     
  2. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Likely not until those girls are gone. And honestly in my contract when someone buys a milker from me I tell them "Although Alice milked 5.2, 5.9. (etc...her milking amounts every monday since she kidded) when you get her home you will be thrilled if she milks a pint a milking, any more than that is gravy. Next year when she kids at your house you will be amazed how much milk she milks and how much better she will look".

    So my advice is you should be too the moon that she is milking that much still, especially with being moved and being picked on. Make sure you watch her worm load with the move. Vicki
     

  3. doulanobles

    doulanobles Guest

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    Ok, that's kind of what I figured. I'm certainly not complaining as that is still a lot of milk. She's a doll on the stand...never moves her feet at all eben if she finishes eating before I finish. Also, she's being very patient with us as my 10yo daughter and my mom are both learning to milk so they can take over when i go to a conference in a couple of weeks. We are tickled with her!

    Also, she was wormed with Cydectin by Jennie the day she arrived and I'm going to do a fecal next week and go from there.
     
  4. Jennie

    Jennie New Member

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    I'm glad you guys are happy with her. She is such a sweet heart. The other thing that can be affecting her milk is the heat. All of my girls are down right now with the huge change in the temp. It's just one more thing to add to her list of stress. I'll try giving you a call tomorrow.
     
  5. Little Moon

    Little Moon New Member

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    Keep up with whatever you are doing - it sounds pretty darned good.

    We too recently bought a doe in milk. She is a FF, and was putting out between 3 & 4 quarts a day. When she got home her production fell off so dramatically that I very seriously contemplated drying her off. But instead I kept after her. There were many milkings where we were lucky if she gave us 2 ounces. We have had great improvement - we are now up to almost a quart at each milking. I work full time (and then some) so milking her 3 times a day to help boost productin is not an option. I am anxious to see what her next freshening is like.

    Keep up the good work.

    Anne
     
  6. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

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    It is best to move a doe before she kids or within a week or so thereafter. The move and adjustment to a new home and new herdmates is hard on any doe. You can expect them to almost completely dry up and even with consistent milkings she may never regain to the level she was before the move. If a doe is moved with nursing kids, she will do a better job of keeping up her milk production as the kids are nursing and because she is bonded to the kids, she will not be as stressed as a doe sold alone.
     
  7. cloverhillgoats

    cloverhillgoats New Member

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    I bought a FF LaMancha from lynn 3 weeks ago. I was feeding Vicki's mix and she produced 5 pounds a day. I decided to try the Bluebonnet 10% dry feed and I mixed it in with Vicki's mix for a week. The next week, I ran out of oats but did combine the rest of Vicki's mix with the BB and her milk production went down to 3.5 pounds a day. I bought some oats and went back to the Bluebonnet/Vicki's mix combination and she is back up to 5 pounds a day. I didn't change the alfalfa hay or anything else. They picked all the oats out of the BB and made a huge mess. As long as it is mixed in with Vicki's mix, they eat everything in the bucket. My FF Nubian only dropped off about 4 ounces--but she is a big-time pasture grazer whereas the LM just depends on her alfalfa hay. In other words they have different eating habits off the stand. I feel like I am rambling, but my question is this: Is there a connection between oats and milk production?
     
  8. mill-valley

    mill-valley New Member

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    10% seems like awfully low protein...my mix is 16% and I know some breeders feed 18%. I don't know how much protein is in oats, but if they are higher than 10% that could explain the difference.
     
  9. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    :biggrin I've moved goats from the north to the south and I've had it take until the next freshening for them to adjust, aclimate, and go back to their normal amount of milk. It's just something I expect. Have done it too many times for it to be a fluke.
    Kaye
     
  10. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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    Wow, I guess it depends!

    Sold a FF in April, at 5 weeks fresh. She was giving 11.0 lbs/day when she left. Within 2 weeks she was giving 11.0 lbs/day again and had totally melded with this gal's herd of Nubians (Daisy's a Saanen). Misty was so pleased.

    Just received a call today from gal who bought a doe from me on Tuesday. FF that kidded in March and was producing 9.0 lbs/day for us. She is giving this gal 1/2 gallon in the AM and 1/2 gallon in the PM. She has a Sable doe kid with her, but no other goats there, so no "competing". Michelle says she is a doll on the milk stand and she doesn't even have to lock her head into the stanchion. I guess being easy-going has a lot to do with it...

    Just a note - both of these purchasers changed their feed to resemble our management - 1/2 oats, 1/2 barley, BOSS and good alfalfa hay. That probably helped too.

    Camille
     
  11. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    When my alfalfa is 17% protein I don't rely on my milkstand grain to supply protein of any sort...right now with alfalfa 15% yep they get soy on the milkstand to boost the oats protein. Oats and barley simply make milk for me....with constant alfalfa that is.

    Vicki
     
  12. cloverhillgoats

    cloverhillgoats New Member

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    Well, 10% is low, but it was the only BB that I could find without the molasses in it. I had the calf manna (25%) mixed in with it, though, and the alfalfa is 16%, I guess when they picked around the BB, they only ate the oats and barley. Just curious to see if I could find something a little cheaper that would work. What BB dry feed do you all use? Do you rely on your alfalfa for protein?
     
  13. LynninTX

    LynninTX New Member

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    It depends SO much and on what... I don't know! :lol

    My first 2 goats had been moved around alot the yr I bought them and it really took until the following yr for them to milk well here... bought fall of 04 they milked dribs & drabs, spring 05 kidded and milked low, but ok, kidded spring 06 and did SO MUCH better...

    then I've had goats come here and never miss an ounce it seems....

    or come here and the next kidding far surpass anything they ever did before... Babee is an example... bottom of the pecking order where I got her... here... though not the temperment to be herd queen... the competition is different and she is my top milker day after day after day...

    and I've seen the same with goats leaving.

    Feed and management play a part... but I wonder if the herd they are going into and the goat's temperment also play a role...