hoof issue

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Patty13637, Aug 26, 2008.

  1. Patty13637

    Patty13637 New Member

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    I am sure this has something to do with the way I am trimming . I have a few girls that the outer V of there hoofs is turning under to the inside. So if they had people feet they would be walking on the outer side of there foot . :sigh Hope that makes sense. How do I correct it now and how do I trim so it does not happen ? I think I am leaving toes to long :sniffle :help2


    Patty
     
  2. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    I was and still am to a point, having the same issue.. I did however, find that if I trimmed outside the barn in bright sunlight (ok, I do it in the shade) but still the light is better, that I do a better job of it. I guess my eyes are going down hill at a rapid rate!
    Anyhow, being outside lets me see the whole foot better. I think if they stand with the outer hoof tucked in, then maybe the inside toe is a tad too long. And make sure your taking enough off the heel too. I think Vicki said to get a piece of wood that's 1"w x 1/2"thick x a couple of inches long, shave the hair off the foot and mark the lower foot level with their coronary band and that's where you trim.
    Hope this helps..
     

  3. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    How long are you waiting between trimmings? Have any photos?
     
  4. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    I'm not sure I got exactly what was happening from your post. It sounds like the outer walls, (which is the main part we trim) is being left too long. On a properly trimmed hoof, looking at it from the bottom, it should be rather flat, no excess walls, stray pieces, etc. No where for bacteria to hide.

    I do horse feet all the time and have a "hoof fetish" you could say. I had a hard time learning to trim the goats, as their feet are so different from horses. I was leaving toes too long, and then having them look wierd and gather poop and dirt in the little V at the toe. Now I use the goat nippers to take off as much wall as I can, and then use a sharp rasp to level the hoof from the bottom, clear down to where I can clearly see the clean white line, even at the toe. I then rasp between the toes, getting rid of any tattery pieces and making sure there are no spaces or crevises for bacteria and dirt to hide. I sometimes need to trim an especially tattered area from the top, with the rasp, taking all or at least most of the area away. I've never had to trim down to pink, and no goat has ever been tender from a trim. A gravel area is a great thing to have for your goats to walk through every day. My pastured goats feet look so much better than the paddocked goats feet, due to getting more natural wear.
    Hope this helps.
    Anita
     
  5. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    Oh, three to four weeks during the heavy summer growth time is about the Max you can go between trims and still keep feet healthy. In the winter, you can stretch it out a week or two. Otherwise, too much growth occurs, providing excellent habitat for bacteria to flourish. Regularly trimmed feet do not accumulate the same amount of manure that longer feet do.