Home Dairy/ Shopping list request.

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by new2goats, Aug 24, 2008.

  1. new2goats

    new2goats Guest

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    I debated for a while on where I should post this as I have a variety of questions..so I figured this was the best place to put it as the majority is related to this topic. :biggrin

    I am wanting some ideas on the basic home dairy equipment I will need (kind of a shopping list so to speak). Last year we lost our home in an electrical fire at 2 AM and even though it's been a year my kitchen (and rest of the house for that matter) is still lacking in what people consider basic items..just haven't got around to replacing all that was lost..figure it took years to accumulate everything, it will take years to get it all again. Not to mention when your so very accustomed to certain items just being there, it's very easy to forget that you actually don't have alot of the basics..hence the reason we've been slow on getting it all replaced.

    First, I would like to know what I would need for my milking equipment (other than, obviously a milking stand or two).

    What sort of container do you use to milk your goats into (plastic, stainless steel ect.)?
    I'm wanting mini dairy goats so is there a container that works better to use with them or no?
    What would I need once I have the milk (as in storage containers just for keeping drinking milk the best)?
    Do I need to buy anything in particular for straining, freezing or pasteurizing the milk?
    (Sorry if I'm wording this wrong...all new to me and I don't exactly know how to ask for the info I want, lol)


    For sanitation, what products or supplies would I need for my goats for making sure I am being as sanitary as possible?

    Should I invest in clippers for keeping the does hair trimmed and such? If so, what's a few brand and type recommendations?

    Obviously I want goats for home dairy use so I'd LOVE to make cheeses, yogurts and such. What BASIC supplies would I need for these (Including just your average kitchen appliances and cookware--I have one pot/pan set, a coffee pot, microwave and toaster...nothing else so obviously I need to stock up on lots of stuff) I understand once you get a knack for everything and actually figure it all out then you'd need more supplies but I'm just wanting a starting point. I saw tons of interesting things on this website: http://www.hoeggergoatsupply.com/xcart/home.php?cat=9 but since most of the terminology is still Greek to me I really can't tell what is needed.

    Any good, easy to understand home dairy books that are recommended? I'm talking the very basic of information as I really don't understand the yogurt, cheese making stuff yet, but would be happy to buy a book to help me get started so I won't bug y'all with the basic of questions (can't read online for long as it gives me a throbbing headache so a book would be the best way I could study up)

    What about yogurt makers and various machines? I priced a few and some are pricey and I wonder if I can EASLIY make homemade dairy items without the gizmos and gadgets or would it be best to invest in some?

    I know everyone is thinking this is going to be a HUGE list, but that's what I want..as many ideas and opinions on what I need as possible. My dad and grandparents decided this year for holidays and my birthday (a month after Christmas) that instead of typical surprise things or event tickets, they wanted me to make a list of things I needed for the home and they would shop off that list (My dad and I are both ebay addicts so if I find what I need on ebay that's what we'll get :) ) and my inlaws followed suit on the idea so hubby and I already know, round about what Santa is brining this year..lol

    Thanks to anyone who jumps in on this....I could use all the ideas and supply list you could offer.
     
  2. chewie

    chewie New Member

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    i use stainless steel pail, which was a bit expensive but if i am going to use it 2x per day for many years to come, the price was good. i enjoy using it, and got it from lehman's. glimmercroft is a site that showed a neat little arrangement for milking mini's, from thrift store finds. i use a s.s. strainer i got from caprine supply, and dairy in-line filters. i use clorox for a mild teat dip and wash, and plenty of clorox for washing up equip. vinegar in the buckets once ina while too, as an acid wash.

    go to fias co farms.com. there is tons of info there, maybe print it off and read it. they are reducing their whole herd, so having that info on paper in case the site goes down isn't a bad idea anyhow.
     

  3. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    I used a flat bottom stainless steel bucket used in camping equiptment for my MINI's for years until I got a machine. I use 1/4 cup clorox to 1 gal water for all udder teat wipes and rinsing buckets etc. I used muslin for years to strain the milk. and also used 1/2 gal canning jars to store milk in. and gal sized Glad Ziplock Freezer bags for freesing the milk.
    See if they have that Turkey Fryer out there to pasturize your milk in that I posted on the forum as it is a god's send.
     
  4. new2goats

    new2goats Guest

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    Turkey Fryer to pasturize huh? Clever idea..those are way more affordable than the milk pasturizers I saw on a few websites. :) Thanks for the tip :D

    Oh, and if you don't mind me asking....if your going to freeze milk how long can you store it frozen and why do you choose ziplock bags to freeze it in? Ziplocks have any advantage to freezeable tupperware containers and such?

    On the bleach/water teat wash...does the bleach cause the skin to dry out or anything like that?

    Oh and if anyone has basic home dairy book reccomendations that explain and break down the basics of cheese and yogurt making I would love to hear them! We LOVE cheese and yogurt here so once I get the hang of it I'm sure none would ever be wasted (that is, assuming I can figure it all out, lol)

    Thanks again!
     
  5. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    go to the cheeze forum and ask away abt anything cheeze.
    I never have a problem with the clorox.
    and I like the freezer bags as they lay flat. but that is the only reason I am using regular 1/2 gal milk jugs now cause I have them. But starting out that is the easiest to get and the best way to go economically.
    If you have a non defrosting deep freeze 1yr a self defrosting they say 2 to 3 mo.
     
  6. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I think a milkstand is a must.

    I prewash with babywetones, the cheapo wallmart kind that are round and pop out of the top. To them I add about 1/4 cup of rubbing alcohol to them.

    Milk into anything that can be cleaned, there are food grade plastics you can get at resturant supplies. I do have the half moon lid stainless pail from hoegerrs, it's an expensive alternative to a stainless unseemed pail from taget etc...

    Buy a good quart sprayer from a feed store for horses, this way you know it will not get eaten up from chemicals. Dollar store ones will only last about a month. Put 1 tablespoon of bleach into it and fill with clean water and use this as a teat dip, make sure the doe stands for 5 mintues after milking and finishing her grain after you finish milking.

    At a resturant supply house I bought for $7 gallon and 1/2 see through plastic containers with lids, they are actually for steam tables, before them I used rubbermaid gallon pitchers from wallmart. Fill to the gallon mark with fresh strained milk, no need to heat it if it's fresh...add one of the culters for cherve for fromage blanc from cheesemaking.com then follow the directions, mine takes about 6 hours to curd and whey..I then pour it into an inside out pillow case, and hang and collect the whey...I just tie mine to the handle of a cabinet in the kitchen. Once dripped I put it back into the gallon container, whip in 1 teaspoon kosher salt, and pack them into rubbermaid 1 pound containers, put some in the fridge and freeze the others.

    So a long list of supplies? Nope. Start with what you really need and then add to it.

    You have to have a weigh tape, hoof trimmers, something to feed the goats in, something to keep the hay in (never hay bags) and something for them to drink water out of. A warm place to sleep out of the driving rain, blowing snow or wind. Good grass hay and alfalfa pellets and whole clean oats or....Alfalfa hay and whole clean oats. Loose minerals. Cydectin. The rest is fluff. Vicki
     
  7. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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  8. laughter777

    laughter777 New Member

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    I must agree with everyone above! Prior to finding this site I thought I needed all the way over priced stuff from Hoeggers, but now I know it can be done in a more cost effective manner!
     
  9. chewie

    chewie New Member

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    this site is one huge must have!! as for books, i have found i get much more from this site and fias co's than any of the books i have. the only one i'd like now is out of my price range! (goat medicine, since most vets are worthless for goats) i've only been a goat person (what IS the term?) for this year, and those first books are already gathering dust.

    and yes, that milkstand (mine is not fancy, just something DH put together with scrap) is a huge help.