Help with bucks

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Dover Farms, Sep 19, 2008.

  1. Dover Farms

    Dover Farms New Member

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    We have two bucklings, one 7 months and the other 6 1/2 months. They were best buds. I put a wether(freezer wether) in with them, because I was getting tired of him pushing the doelings out of the feeders. Of course, they wanted to "ride" him around. Everything was fine and good(the wether didn't think so) and the boys weren't so persistant about riding the wether. We left yesterday after noon to go visit my uncle that was home from WI. Come back home and go outside as I had a doe in heat and wanted her bred. Go to the buck pen and the two bucks had bloody heads. And they would not stop fighting! We had to separate them later when it was dark, because when we went out to check on them.....they were still fighting. No gut slamming or anything....just head to head.

    Any suggestions as to what the heck they're problem is?! And should we just let them fight it out? We really don't have room to keep the two separate....I mean we have pens, but they just aren't big enough for those active boys. Oh and I did take the wether out, because I thought maybe they were fighting over him, but they continued fighting. :sigh Please :help2
     
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Bucks this time of year w/ does in heat are going to fight there is nothing you can do except let them fight it out or move one.
     

  3. Chaty

    Chaty New Member

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    I have 3 bucks and when the wether is put in with them they ride the wether as I think he smells like the does. Myabe its because your doe is in heat and they are competeing for her attention. Mine get rather mean with each other and do have some bloody heads out there also. I have tried separating them but when the other returns its back to fighting again....sorry I'm no help.
    Kathy
     
  4. mill-valley

    mill-valley New Member

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    Sondra is right. I had two mature bucks together last year, both had good-size scurs....they fought until one of them broke the scur off and then he wouldn't fight anymore and got bullied. :/ It really is best to keep them seperate if at all possible. And your wether is going to lose weight getting messed with like that....so if you want him fat for the freezer...probably not your best bet to keep him with these guys.
     
  5. Feral Nature

    Feral Nature Active Member

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    Boys will be boys :crazy
     
  6. I agree with that one Diane!
     
  7. My 2 bucks are behaving exactly the same way. 'Tis the season, the doe in heat and having a "doe" to fight over of their own just pushed them over the edge. ;) My guys don't have a "doe" with them but they have bloddied polls from bashing heads so many times. I have a doe in raging heat right now who I don't want bred yet, and she is not helping. If she doesn't keep away from their fence they are gong to tear it down. They are healthy enough, if they are fighting. I agree, boys will be boys. :biggrin

    I'm just crushed :lol My sweet little bottle raised buckling who was my baby until about 4 weeks ago has turned into a raving, stinky, love crazed buck. (just as I wanted him to do)

    Here's a tip: He thinks I'm a fit object of his "affections" now just like my older buck. Gotta keep an eye on both of them now, carry 2 sticks (actually I use a shovel handle or a cane) between them and me in the pen now. This is not for hitting them with. (I don't strike my animals) I use the "stick" sort of like a bullfighter uses his cape. The buck goes for me and I put the stick in between him and myself and plant the end of it on the ground. While he's pushing my stick around I get out of the way. It's been a neat trick and works pretty well. Toro! Olay! :crazy I'm glad I only have to go in with them to replenish their mineral feeder.
     
  8. Leo

    Leo New Member

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    If you do separate them don't put them in pens next two each other. I did that, the boys were seperated with their own respective girls, well, they hhhaaaddd to headbutt through the fence. The poor fence has a big hole now where they just kept on headbutting, after just a few hours, by the end of the day, I was glad to put the boys back into their own pen. Saves my fence, and they'll get over it, once the girls are bred.
    Megan
     
  9. Dover Farms

    Dover Farms New Member

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    I guess they'll just have to work it out on their own then. They both want to ride on each other and neither will let it happen....idiots. :nooo One wants to just eat and the other won't leave him alone, which is surprising as the one being a poop is usually the more laid back of the two. :shrug

    Megan, we did put them beside each other last night, because neither would shut up and the one sure is loud! They didn't headbutt through the fence at all, though we had a buck that would do that. And heck....when we went out to do chores this morning they were laying on each side of the fence beside each other. :crazy2
     
  10. Leo, when I separate mine, they stand there and holler for each other all day (and all night). They're buddies. They mostly keep it down to a dull roar, until a doe walks by.
     
  11. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    I have a new found respect for the strength that bucks can exhibit.

    They can and will fight and possibly get severily injured. We lost a very valuable buck to a broken neck. They had been penned together since they were babies so this came as a huge surprise as we had not noticed any fighting going on previously. Thankfully, they are gentle giants when it comes to people.

    Be cautious.

    Sara
     
  12. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

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    Bucks during rut are out of their mind. They are not to be trusted around each other or around you. You shold never go into your once gentle buck pen when you are home alone. I know of a grown man who has a permanent shoulder injury as a result from a buck attack.

    My bucks are kept by themselves wiith their own run. I have 3 - 35 ft runs side by side. The bucks always have each other for company so they do not get lonely. However they do bash at the fence during rut and can be hard on the fence.

    Since I feed and water the bucks from the outside, I rarely go in the pen with them. Slipping a doe in the pen with them is not a problem. I tie the buck when I get the doe out. Take all precautions possible this time for year for their safety and yours too.
     
  13. Bucks are very powerful animals Tim. True words. A lot more powerful then they look, and some of them look very powerful. I had a narrow escape from a Boer buck once and was absolutely helpless to do anything about it until help arrived from the house. I was injured, but not permanently. I adopted my "no more horns" policy at that time. However, even without horns, bucks are still powerful and dangerous in rut, all kidding aside.

    My buck pen is several acres large, or I would have them in runs. They are keeping distance between them most of the day all on their own right now, though they are still together. In the evening they share their house and lie peacefully chewing their cuds, even now. They are also about the same size. I wouldn't want to put a much smaller buck in with a larger one. The smaller one would be bullied so much. I don't have to enter the pen to feed them or to clean and refill their water tank. My DH fixed that all up for me after the Boer buck episode. I had people home that day, but it was 15 minutes or more before someone came out to check on me and I was in serious trouble, penned up against the gate. Even when the boys aren't in rut I still carry my stick any time I enter the buck pen and always try to keep distance between myself and them any time I can. (such as filling their mineral feeder when they are 70 yards away grazing, hoping to go unnoticed in there.)

    Something else I've found helpful right now, as we are laying up our store of firewood, is that I take some of the branches from the trees that are too small for firewood and toss them into the buck pen. The bucks seem to like this. It's helpful because they spend more time scent marking and tearing up the brush and leave each other alone more.

    But Tim, I stand in a 10 X 10 foot pen in the corral with 15 or so 500 -600lb steers and bulls and sort them out with the very same cane when we work cattle. Goats are much more intelligent than cattle though.
     
  14. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    I'd separate them. My buck has a wether pasture mate, but this time of year, I have to seperate them due to the buck picking on him..The rest of the year they are fine. Bucks are so hormonal at this time of year they don't even know who they are.
    Anita
     
  15. Someday when I get the resources I do plan to convert my large buck area into runs as Tim has. I just can't afford more fencing and to build a second or third building yet for each buck. I think Tim's setup is ideal. I also need a "real" dairy barn too, but that has to wait as well. I have to use the barn we built originally for Boer goats for my does and kids. With a few modifications it serves, but it kills my back. The roof is very low. One day.......
     
  16. Leo

    Leo New Member

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    You know what, I'm glad you guys said that, because, know that I think about it. Those two, NEVER sleep together, but my older buck used with sleep with his kids(wethers), I thought that eventually they would become buddies and sleep together. But nope, it's been a few months since I butchered the last wether too. Although, now the does are bred so there is peace in goatdom again. No more head butting but if it's nice outside the girls will sleep next to him(older buck) by the fence instead of the barn.

    Those boys can be so silly, and those hormones do make them wonky. :crazy
    Megan
     
  17. Qvrfullmidwife

    Qvrfullmidwife New Member

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    "they do bash at the fence during rut and can be hard on the fence"

    WE had 2 nubian bucks break those metal fence clips in half bashing each other through the fence.
     
  18. To give you an idea how strong a Nubian buck can be: One leg of the fence around our buck pen has wooden posts (just standard wooden fence posts) and the rest of the fence is steel posts. Those bucks are snapping the wooden posts off at the ground. We've been having to go out and replace all the wooden posts with steel ones. :sigh