Help w/ Nubian doe crawling/hoof problems?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by TerriVK, Aug 4, 2014.

  1. TerriVK

    TerriVK New Member

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    I have a 3 yr old Nubian doe who has been crawling around on her front knees for 8-9 weeks now. The only thing I know of that precipitated this was a hoof trim. Our friends who milked for us while we were on vacation (early May) said her hooves were overgrown and suggested we give her a more substantial trim. (She had hoof rot over the winter which we treated and was doing good, walking normally.) The trim looked good and there was no bleeding but afterwards she started crawling on her front knees (still walking normally on back hooves). She acted as though her hooves were tender and would shift her weight when forced to stand and go back down on her knees as soon as possible. After 4 weeks of her crawling, we took her to the vet and they suggested we needed a ferrier. Our friends who raise Nubians came over and gave her a trim. She walked voluntarily afterwards for a couple of days and then went back down on her knees. Since she’s been crawling so much her inside “toe” on her front hoof is outgrowing the outside “toe” which doesn’t allow the hoof to rest evenly when standing. (all the weight rests on the inside of her hoof when standing/walking) We’re still trimming every couple of weeks to try and correct the unevenness. We don’t know how to get her up and walking again. Any advice is greatly appreciated!
     
  2. punchiepal

    punchiepal Member

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    Has she been tested for CAE?
     

  3. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

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    This is a classic sign of founder or laminitis. It can happen after an injury (like being too aggressive when trimming or from stepping on a nail) but mostly comes from a wrong diet where she got too much of something. it is important to feed a low sugar, low starch, high fibre diet, with calorie intake controlled when necessary. You will have to pen her away from the herd and put her on a strict diet of a good grass hay and little else.

    There is a product called Remission that is made for horses that some have had luck using. You can add this to a cup of grain.

    Constant trimming of the hoof every 10 days will be necessary to keep the over growth of the hooves under control.
     
  4. TerriVK

    TerriVK New Member

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    Thank You!

    Thank you Tim for the reply! We ordered the Remission, as no one around here carried it, and received it in the mail yesterday. I wonder if you have any ideas on the dosage? Our goat is 150lbs and I know it's not a straight conversion from the chart on the bag because it's for horses. (If it were, it would be 1/3 Tbsp) I've read because of the ruminant stomach you have to up the dosage? Also, we soaked her hooves in ice water which seemed to be a pain reliever and she got up and walked around for the next 20+ mins after that. We've cut out the grain as per your advice. Our friends, the Binghams, said any advice you give is good advice to follow! Thanks again!
     
  5. TerriVK

    TerriVK New Member

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    no CAE

    Thank you Jennifer for weighing in! The herd she came from has been tested and she's had no exposure to any other goats, so I'm pretty sure she's CAE free.
     
  6. Rose

    Rose New Member

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    Did you see the test results?
     
  7. KJFarm

    KJFarm Senior Member

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    Please always ask to "see" current test results...and then test them yourself immediately. Just yesterday visited with another brokenhearted goat owner, who was told the goats she purchased were CAE negative. She just tested through WADDL, and the goat is positive, so she was making a hard decision to have the goat and her 2 kids put down. She paid a good amount of money for the goats, so this is a devastating blow.

    It's sad, but in the world we live in, you just cannot take people at their word anymore.
     
  8. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

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    It is a great idea to test even if it is for your own peace of mind. I would eliminate the CAE question as part of the treatment.

    I tried the ice water baths twice a day for a month and it didn't seem to help that much. Other people have tried it with some success. it is important to feed a low sugar, low starch, high fibre diet, with calorie intake controlled as necessary.

    I wouldn't be afraid to give a little extra of the Remission.
     
  9. KJFarm

    KJFarm Senior Member

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    A good friend of mine who is using this on a foundered doe, gives 1/2oz. per day. The doe weighs about 140#. She is up and walking perfectly on this stuff.
     
  10. dragonlair

    dragonlair New Member

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    I had a doe several years ago who had foundered before I got her. I gave her Bute paste until her feet stabilized. It helped that I was married to a farrier who specialized in diseased feet! She had rock hard hooves and the ripply fever rings. We trimmed every week or 2. She did recover but she was on a low protein, high fiber/higher fat diet.