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Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Spicer Creek Goats, Jan 11, 2009.

  1. Spicer Creek Goats

    Spicer Creek Goats New Member

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    I know I've read about this before. I've done a search and can't find it. My buck got out of his pen sometime last night and got into the grain-had way more than his share. Do I give him baking soda--if so, how much. Or is it oil??? This just drives me crazy when I know I've seen this before! So far, he is okay, but I don't want to wait to see if blows up like a big old balloon. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks, Julie
     
  2. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    Baking soda.. I get my finger wet, run it through the BS & wipe it on his tongue. or you could put a teaspoon in a bowl, mix it with water to dissolve, suck it up in a syringe and dose him.
    My goats have gotten into the chicken food numerous times. If they get diarrhea, I let it run it's course, but have always had good results with the BS only.
    Bad Boy! :)
     

  3. Spicer Creek Goats

    Spicer Creek Goats New Member

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    Thanks for the info Stacy. I've never had this happen before. I was pretty sure it was baking soda, just didn't know if I should be doing anything else.
    Julie
     
  4. SherrieC

    SherrieC Active Member

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    I always back in the day gave Oil and baking soda. I have therabloat up in my cuboards now. Cheap insurance. : ) don't you want to coat him tummy in case he ate too much and get it poo'ed out. I don't deal with this anymore since finally getting good system of locks.
     
  5. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    in goat 101 is Sue Reiths article on bloat use that.
     
  6. Spicer Creek Goats

    Spicer Creek Goats New Member

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    Sherri & Sondra, Thanks for the response. I finally did find Sue Reiths article and I have treated him. He seems okay, sure hope he is in the morning. Maybe he didn't eat as much as I thought. I know he spent some time banging his head against my boer bucks pen--dummy has a skinned up head!

    I panicked when I couldn't find the info. I try to be as prepared as I can be, but you all know how that is. Thanks again.

    Julie
     
  7. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    It really depends upon how much grain he actually has eaten. A teaspoon of baking soda stuck to your finger isn't really going to do much of anything. I also keep thera bloat or bloat guard on hand.

    You really have to decide in minutes....has he eaten enough to cause impaction of his rumen, to plug him up with grain and start acidosis, or is it just enough grain so he is going to get bloat (grain makes gas), that you can treat, and not impaction which if you don't fill his rumen full of oil right now, will kill him. Once impacted and the rumen shuts down, without surgery you can't save them.

    At the very least I would put down a couple of ounces of oil, add your baking soda and then spend the evening walking him and keeping his rumen going with massage. He should have really good diarrhea in the morning, then start rebuilding the rumen bugs you have smothered with the oil...lots of good hay, no grain, probiotics, yogurt kefir and you may also need to use banamine if he is uncomfortable.

    A full grown goat has a rumen that holds about 3.5 to 5 gallons of roughage...you can see how a teaspoon or so of baking soda isn't doing anything, nor is syringing in 6cc syringe fulls of oil.

    Learn to tube, get better locks on what your grain is in, and keep thera bloat or bloatguard on hand.

    If your 2 or 3 year old child can open the containers, or doors to and from your goat barns to your feed room, fix them with higher latches or more complicated ones. Vicki
     
  8. hsmomof4

    hsmomof4 New Member

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    Hi Julie,
    I have a notebook that I've started. It has those page protector things that you can slide printed out sheets into. So far, I haven't had a lot happen with my goats (I've only had them since the end of October) but I figure that eventually, something will happen, and it will probably be when my internet is down! So I have printed off things like Sue Reith's bloat article and slid them in there. (I don't have all of goatkeeping 101 in there yet, but I'm probably working up to it.) It's a work in progress and whenever any issue comes up on the boards, I have a look and if I think it's going to be good general purpose information, in it goes. That way, I've got it, even if my internet is down and my local goat mentors are unavailable. Of course, I'm sure I won't have information on every possibility, and it's not as good as getting a specific response from a goat expert to your particular situation, but it's a start!