Hay questions for those living in TX

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Katarina, Sep 21, 2008.

  1. Katarina

    Katarina New Member

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    So...we all know that state of alfalfa hay in the area. So my question is what in general do you look for when you are looking for hay? Kind?
     
  2. Katarina

    Katarina New Member

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    specifically would you have reservations about bahia hay?
     

  3. laughter777

    laughter777 New Member

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    I feed all my animals a Bermuda/Bahia mix. Although it is something like 95% Bermuda, 3% Coastal Bermuda, and 2% Bahia. I know there are warnings against feeding pure Bahia to bred mares, but don't know anything about it. (do y'all need hay??)
     
  4. Rose

    Rose New Member

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    Honestly, hubby brought back alfalfa from Arizona last fall!

    I'll just get baled gordo, bahia, coastal bermuda, or what I can find in square bales.

    I'm a firm believer in alfalfa pellets and browse. :)
     
  5. Katarina

    Katarina New Member

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    We do pellets and browse but I also want to lay in a supply of hay.
     
  6. laughter777

    laughter777 New Member

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    We fertilize (not sure with what) and our guy tells us it is a 12%, but haven't had it tested so not 100% sure on that...but it is used as a filler for all our animals...not a main diet.
     
  7. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Go to seedland.com (thanks Whim :) I don't know what I am talking about :)

    They have all the varieties of Bermuda and all the varieties of Bahai on there. Vicki
     
  8. nitrors4

    nitrors4 Guest

    Well my entire yard is Bahai and all my animals look great. I have 100 bales reserved for this winter.
     
  9. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    """(thanks Whim I don't know what I am talking about V""""

    :rofl


    Don't know what you're talking about, but my wife says that I'm almost right part of the time ....so I'll be glad to take the credit ...I guess.


    I'll be honest about the hay thing around here. I just as soon my hay (for goats) look like a heinz 57 variety.....a little of anything and everything. I don't really want it heavily fertilized either, as my goats tend to throw their noses up at it if it's real rich. Now my Alpine seems to like the richer type foods, but these ND's seemed to be just as happy to be eating dry oak leaves.....must be a genetic thing.

    About the only thing that I get picky about with hay around here, is that it is cut and dried properly, and that it is very clean (meaning very little dust and dirt in it). Anything slightly moldy looking or smelling moldy is out of the question. A few weeds are always welcome.

    Whim
     
  10. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    coastal burmuda or sudan here and prefer sudan
     
  11. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Yes I would kill for sudan or oat hay or peanut. Vicki
     
  12. Qvrfullmidwife

    Qvrfullmidwife New Member

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    are y'all concerned about prussic acid poisoning in the sorghum type hays?
     
  13. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    No because this is usually from grazing on them and new growth after a drought or frost not from cut hay.
     
  14. Qvrfullmidwife

    Qvrfullmidwife New Member

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    I have read that both drought and then rapid growth when it rains after drought can cause it and "Fresh forages have higher concentrations of prussic acid than silages or hay. However, if the forage had extremely high concentrations of prussic acid before cutting or if the hay was not properly cured, dangerous levels of prussic acid can remain."
     
  15. Qvrfullmidwife

    Qvrfullmidwife New Member

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    (Can you tell that I just sat in on dd vet science 'toxic plants' classes? LOL)
     
  16. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    I can tell you this I use whenever I can get it sudan hay/Vicki would also/and Janie KJFarms uses it all the time.
     
  17. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I know Ray grows it, perhaps he will know the answer. I do know Kaye (Kaye in the club not Kaye White :) grows it and we asked her alot of questions on it, know also she tests hers and conditions it....PM Ray to answer here if he doesn't see this. vicki
     
  18. Rambar Ranch

    Rambar Ranch New Member

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    Sudan thats cut during a drought would be safe. You just get a rush of prussic acid in fast growth after it rains, you need to wait approx 10 days to the levels to drop. The same goes for after a frost. If the hay does have prussic acid it does degenerate in time with storage. They general suggest if you bale it during the higher percentage times that you allow at least 30 days storage before feeding so the levels will drop.

    Were planning on planting a field with a mix of oats, rye, and clover (trying for 50% of this) for this winter to make hay in early spring. I want to try this so I can lower the amount of alfalfa pellets fed since clover is nearly as good as alfalfa for making milk.

    The biggest thing to look at with sudan hay is to make sure they dried it properly. Sometimes it grows so big and dense that it has difficulty drying if they dont give it enough time and you can end up with green clumps in it. This of course causes it to mold and can even start fires in your barn with the heat combustion. Check also that they didn't allow it to grow to far into seed stage as then you'll just be paying for alot of thick stems and not as much palatable hay. Our goats love the leaf but won't touch a stem.

    Ray
     
  19. doublebowgoats

    doublebowgoats Active Member

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    When I bought my very first goat, the vet told me to get Sudan if possible or oat hay. And alfalfa. I think that's the last last time I've had a vet be on target about something!
    There's also a type of bermuda (tifton 85)and it has 11-12 % protein sometimes more. I agree with Whim about having a variety. Always alfalfa hay or pellets but a blend of several types of grass hay keeps the girls interested.