Grade A Milk

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by mamatomany, Oct 9, 2008.

  1. mamatomany

    mamatomany New Member

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    I would love to achieve a Grade A Milk which means that the milk is cooled to 40 degrees within 30 minutes. Unfortunately, I am at a grade b level which is 48 degrees in 30 minutes using an ice water bath and trying to stir the water/shake the milk throughout the 30 minute process. I was wondering if anyone knows of a product that can be used besides the commercial bulk cooling tank to get the milk cooler. Some kind of ciculating something. I have tried to set the bucket inside a container with ice while I milk, bucket floats, what a mess trying to get it into the small hole! It still only got it to 48 degrees althought there is no foam which is nice. I will try the rock salt if you really think that would make a difference and bring me to the 40. How much would I use?
     
  2. tmfinley

    tmfinley Member

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    I think the rock salt would make a big difference. There is a reason Ice cream makers call for salted ice and not just regular ice. As for the amount, I would think, like ice cream makers, just sprinkle a layer of salt over the ice every few inches deep.

    Tiff
     

  3. wardarden

    wardarden New Member

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    Linda,

    I got this idea from a lady off of another list. Put some water in a pot on the stove and warm it. Dissolve as much rock salt as you can in this water to make a really strong brine mixture. Brine will not freeze in your freezer. So I picked up a small child's beach bucket at Walgreen's one day for .99cents and keep this brine in my freezer. It does not freeze in the freezer and when I strain my milk into 2 quart jars I pop the jar into the bucket of brine mixture and leave it for about 30 minutes. I have not done the temperature test to see how long it takes to get to 40 deg. but it cools faster than anything else I have tried. Only problem is that I'm getting ready to go to work in the mornings and if I don't remember to take it out it gets frozen solid!

    Hope this helps,
    Arden
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Agitating and stirring of the milk is what causes the goat milk to get goaty. The fatty acids in goats milk are very fragile, break them and you have goaty tasting milk that doesn't keep.

    And what a cool idea on the frozen brine!!! Vicki
     
  5. mamatomany

    mamatomany New Member

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    WELL GEEZ, here I'm thinkin I'm doing the right thing....this forum has truly humbled me in many areas :)
     
  6. mamatomany

    mamatomany New Member

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    As I'm sitting here thinking about it, how do I stir chocolate Kwik mix into it then? Or put it into the microwave for warmy milk in the morning (sippy cup) - has to be shook so there is no "hot" spots?
     
  7. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Vicki is talking abt stirring it when your trying to cool it down, and then keeping it fresh, not when your wanting to drink it.
     
  8. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Yeah :) Thanks Sondra. You can shake it or blend it or make icecream and eat it....but set it back in the fridge.....icko! It looses it's ability to keep without tasteing like buck beard. vicki
     
  9. mamatomany

    mamatomany New Member

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    You guys crack me up!
     
  10. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I really do think that this whole milk vat stirring thing, or worse agitation during pasteurising is why goatmilk in the grocery store is just so awful! I don't think it has much to do with pasteurising, because in cooking with milk.adding to mash potatoes, puddings, ice cream base, it's heated to past pasteurising and my food doesn't taste like buck. Vicki
     
  11. chewie

    chewie New Member

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    ahhh, i do believe vicki has something there!! yuppers, the cooling tanks are running a paddle all the time. i didn't realize tho. it makes goaty milk! learning every day!!
     
  12. Tricia

    Tricia New Member

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    Linda -- Where did you find your cooling standard for Grade A milk? Is it a special state standard? I've never seen a 30-minute requirement.

    The federal standard for raw milk to be pasteurized to Grade A standards is found in Section 18R of the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance:

    Our state standard (Massachusetts) for raw milk for retail is:

     
  13. mamatomany

    mamatomany New Member

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    I found it in my cheese making book. I don't sell it, but would like my milk practices to be "top notch." I wish these silly goats would produce more milk so I could give it away :) next freshening, next freshening, next freshening...
     
  14. Tricia

    Tricia New Member

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    Linda -- For the first couple of hours after it is drawn, milk is pretty antibiotic so the two-hour cooling practice limit should more than suffice for good quality milk. My standard plate count on my monthly test is always 1,000 cfu (think this is the minimum reporting limit)-- max. limit for milk destined for pasteurization is 150,000 cfu (bacterial colony-forming units) (industrial milk can be pretty dirty) -- this is hand-milking with hot water sanitizing. Relatively easy to get great quality milk with healthy animals and clean practices. Good to focus on quick cooling -- sounds like you're doing great. Was this Mary Jane Toth's book?
     
  15. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Tricia is right and here is another from Washington

    Milk and milk products for consumption in the raw state or for pasteurization shall be cooled within two hours of completion of milking to forty degrees Fahrenheit or less and maintained at that temperature until picked up, in accordance with RCW 15.36.201, so long as the blend temperature after the first and following milkings does not exceed fifty degrees Fahrenheit.
     
  16. Wendy Tinney

    Wendy Tinney New Member

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    Back to the shaking thing, somebody told me once that these customers of theirs lived down a long, bumpy dirt road. They were the only customers that would come back and complain about the milk tasting goaty. Forever they could not figure it out and then realized that the road was causing the problem. I have since been quite careful not to shake to much.

    Love the brine idea!! Would save on a lot of ice tray filling.

    Wendy
     
  17. homeacremom

    homeacremom New Member

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    I can see that brine idea being put into regular use around here. COOL! and thanks.
     
  18. homeacremom

    homeacremom New Member

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    But your food is also not setting around for another week (or two) before it gets used. I do agree that agitation, transportation, handle and rehandled has alot to do with the horrible flavor. Just don't quite see that flash pastuerization with its temp extremes and the pressurized systems, etc, have nothing to do with it. :) And not to mention the possible poor management, unhealthy goats used to produce the milk. It may taste horrible straight out of the udder.
     
  19. Wendy Tinney

    Wendy Tinney New Member

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    I think you got it in the last sentence. When I first bought goats the lady told me to never feed alfalfa. So, I didn't. Milk tasted horrible. Went out to see Vicki and she fed alfalfa. Went home changed program and milk was fine. Now, was it the alfalfa? I don't know for sure, but I have always attributed it to that. I can't imagine that a dairy that sold to the "big guys" could afford to feed their goats even half way as good as we do.

    Wendy
     
  20. laughter777

    laughter777 New Member

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    Now Vicki, how many buck beards are you tasting?!?!