Glass or Plastic baby food jars?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by nitrors4, Jan 7, 2009.

  1. nitrors4

    nitrors4 Guest

    I am collecting baby food jars in anticipation of dipping baby goat hooves in iodine.

    I did not know this, but apparently now some baby food jars are plastic and some are glass...does it matter which ones we use?
    :help2

    Michelle
     
  2. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    Why go through all the hassle of collecting baby food jars when Dixie cups work just as well and are disposable? :)

    Sara
     

  3. nitrors4

    nitrors4 Guest

    Well, because I didn't think of that... :blush

    That is what we have all you great minds on DGI for ;)

    Michelle
     
  4. SherrieC

    SherrieC Active Member

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    Sara youre so smart!!
    I use a spray bottle squirt their hoofs and navels, then repeat later.
     
  5. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    dixie cups at times even my cup out of the cupboard cut off pop bottles
     
  6. KingsCoGoatGuy

    KingsCoGoatGuy New Member

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    Pill bottles when the cat gets his wormers, I keep them all year long and normally have enough for the batches of kids. :) I am not a fan of dipping feet instead I spray them and dip navels. Seen one sheep breeder dip navals and then feet and move on to the next lamb repeating. Thats one way to defeat what you are trying to do in the first place.
     
  7. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    If your Iodine is strong enough...you could dip a grown goats foot and then babies and still have no bacteria able to survive. If you use a weaker solution or something else, then I don't think I'd even dip another babies navel cord in the same solution. But with that said..iodine is found to be the most effective in drying out, killing bacteria, and cauterizing those navels/feet.

    I use dixie cups here with a small amount of 10% Iodine. Yea, I found some 10% at an old pharmacy store...but, I also have the 7% in storage, when I run out of the 10%. :biggrin A dipping in that stuff and the navel is STILL Iodine colored when it falls OFF!

    Kaye
     
  8. goat girl

    goat girl New Member

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    glass could shatter!

    But here is a stupid question. I have heard/done dipping navels after birth, but not feet. Why feet?
    Christine
     
  9. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    They are wicking sources just like navels. I also just spray, a few times a couple hours apart. Since I deliever all my kids from mom into shavings in portable kid pens, its not really as much about keeping dirty pen gunk out of the navels and feet, it's alot more about getting them to dry quickly.

    And kids born in icky barns, no amount of iodine after the fact is going to do anything for that intial bacteria up in their cords and on their feet. And if your goats dig like mine, even a surface clean barn is pretty darn icky when they dig under the pretty shaving and straw into the old dirt below! Vicki
     
  10. nitrors4

    nitrors4 Guest

    Vicki ours are trying to dig to China I swear. They dug a hole on the other side of the door and I stepped through not looking and about went down. :biggrin

    I think they were trying to get me. Too smart. Told them they would be good in the freezer so they better watch it. :rofl
     
  11. SherrieC

    SherrieC Active Member

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    yow, Kaye thanks for that tip, I'm going to check out the smaller pharmacy's in town just maybe : )
     
  12. Katarina

    Katarina New Member

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    dixie cups here or the sample cups that we use for our milk at market.

    in the past we have used the plastic cap that covers the nipple on human baby bottles.
     
  13. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    What are we going to use when we run out of our 7%? I was not at all pleased with the new stuff out that is supposed to be iodine, it is not. Vicki
     
  14. Caprine Beings

    Caprine Beings New Member

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    I also spray, but I have acquired a box of iodine wipes that I thought of using for the feet. Not the small 1x1 but 4x4 wipes. I'll give it a try this year. Tammy
     
  15. nitrors4

    nitrors4 Guest

    Is Triodine-7 real or the fake stuff?
     
  16. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    It's fake you can tell when you use it. Vicki
     
  17. Cotton Eyed Does

    Cotton Eyed Does New Member

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    That is what I used last year. I guess it worked fine. Didn't have any kid problems.
     
  18. Necie@Lunamojo

    [email protected] Active Member

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    This article is almost a year old...

    http://wp2.medina-gazette.com/2008/01/29/accent/iodine-not-available-through-retail-stores-catalogs/


    Iodine not available through retail stores, catalogs
    January 29th, 2008 · No Comments
    Dianne Shoemaker, Ohio State University Extension dairy specialist, reports there are changes in availability of 7 percent iodine.

    Completing one of the critical steps in newborn calves, foals, lambs, kids and piglet care will now take a little more planning. Having a constant supply of 7 percent tincture of iodine on the farm is more important than it was less than a month ago, as the product is no longer available at local or mail-order farm supply outlets.

    Why is 7 percent tincture of iodine, used for dipping newborn livestock navels, no longer available at those sources? Creative illegal drug manufacturers and unscrupulous livestock supply dealers conspired to use 7 percent iodine to produce iodine crystals which were then used to produce methamphetamines. As a result, the U. S. Drug Enforcement Agency moved iodine, previously designated as a “List Two” chemical, to a “List One” chemical. For us, that means the DEA now will regulate sales of all products containing more than 2.2 percent iodine.

    You still can purchase 7 percent iodine to dip navels, but it can only be purchased through a vendor who is registered to handle controlled products. It is likely your veterinarian is registered to handle other DEA-controlled substances and may also carry 7 percent iodine for their clients. It will mean extra paperwork for the veterinarian’s business. Talk to them before your current supply runs out.


    So, why bother dipping navels at all?

    An important step in newborn livestock care is dipping the umbilical cord in a 7 percent tincture of iodine as soon after birth as possible. A tincture contains alcohol. The alcohol provides drying action, while the iodine has disinfectant properties. It is a long-held belief this management practice plays a large role in preventing navel ill and other infections.

    Logically, it makes sense. The umbilical cord is the unborn livestock’s lifeline in the uterus, delivering nutrients and removing wastes during gestation. Following birth, it no longer serves those functions, but it is still a direct route into the calf’s body until total closure takes place. Nature provides for the umbilical cord to close off, dry off, fall off, and heal over, just as nature provides for the newborn to receive passive immunity through the dam’s colostrum. Management practices of navel-dipping and hand-feeding colostrum are designed to help nature do its job.

    Is there a good substitute for 7 percent tincture of iodine? Possibly, but right now anyone who tells you anything specific is probably guessing. A quick search of past and current research turns up no studies on this topic specifically.

    Can we use one of the iodine-based dairy teat dips? We do know teat dips are not effective as navel dips. Iodine-based teat dips contain 1 percent iodine or less. They also don’t contain the alcohols comparable to an iodine tincture. Tinctures containing 2 percent iodine still will be available over the counter. A short-term patch would be to use these for several days in a row until the umbilical cord is completely dried. Realistically, most farms are doing well to get a navel dipped once in 7 percent iodine, let alone re-dipping two or three more times.

    Dipping navels in 7 percent tincture of iodine is an important management practice, helping to minimize illness and death loss in newborn livestock. Keeping an adequate supply on hand will take a little more planning since the product is now a U.S. DEA List One chemical. Don’t use this change as an excuse not to dip navels. Eventually, a newborn will fall victim to septicemia or navel ill. Don’t let your newborn livestock be victims of illegal drugs.

    Miller is the agriculture and natural resources agent of Ohio State University Extension, Medina County. For more information, call Ohio State University Extension Medina County at 330-725-4911, 330-336-6657 or 330-225-7100, ext. 9237. Visit the Extension’s Web page at www.ag.ohio- state.edu/~medi.
     
  19. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    Well...that pretty well stops anyone that doesn't have a DEA # from selling it. Every vet has a DEA # or MD to be able to prescribe and order class 1 & 2 drugs. Dang it...guess I start poking and proding some friends with DEA#'s to be able to get basic Iodine. Why is it that illegal drug pharmacists (and I use the term with tounge in cheek) can get their hands on anything...but us that use it for the intended purpose are the ones that suffer? Guess they'll be making common household cleaners illegal next...or steel wool.?
    Kaye