forage to decrease the HC worm burdon

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Bella Star, Dec 3, 2007.

  1. Bella Star

    Bella Star New Member

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    I have been reading up on the HC worm and what will help my goat's with the problem I have here in E. Texas . I read that Sericea lespedeza is a perennial invasive grass that grows up to 5 feet tall ,loves poor,dry soil and goats love it ,however other cattle doesn't , It seems to be growing all over Arkansas .
    Does anybody here have this grass ?? Sericea lespedeza ???

    I think anything beats cactus !!
    This sounds like a goaters dream :biggrin
     
  2. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    Linda ,,, yes , it grows readily in most road right of ways and open fields around here......but it really is not much grass like as you might be thinking. It is more weed like if anything. We have planted it on hunting properties in the past, because it has so many benefits to both large and small game. It is a deep rooted and very drought tolerant plant that normal matures every year at about 2 ft tall.
    We had our best success planting it by using a grain drill. Heavy grasses tend to choke it out a little bit if planted in rich soil. It works best around here to reclaim poor, over worked ground, that may come as a result from strip mining, ect.
    I think it would be best if with goats on it, that it only be made available to them in rotation. I really believe that constant over grazing on this plant would kill it out . Unlike grass, its regrowth is much slower.
     

  3. Ashley

    Ashley New Member

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    That's what that stuff is! We have a little, though my goats didn't seem terribly interested in it, maybe they just need to get a taste for it. I wonder if that would be good to plant on our hillside to the southwest of our house, it's rocky and grass grows sparse there.
     
  4. Kaye White

    Kaye White New Member

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    :lol One field my hay man does has a lot of lespedeza gowing in it...along with Johnson grass...HE KNOWS we want the hay from that field. ;) When fed as hay, the goats have a very hard time choosing between mouthfuls of johnson or lespedeza. As we drive along the interstate DH & I make the comments...sure wish we had all that baled.
    Here's an interesting site on planting Sericea Lespedeza.
    http://www.scsrpc.org/SCSRPC/Files/Files/SL planting & weed control.pdf
    Kaye
     
  5. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    Just be sure to research this plant a little to be sure that you know what your getting......there are several lespedeza's....... ..bi color ? is one that can be bought and planted, and it is more of a shrub or bush, and can spread like wild fire and be a pain. I've seen it 10 ft tall , which is to high for most goats, unless they were to ride it down. ......cobe? is a low growing type...6 to 12 or so inches, and would be more helpful to smaller mammals.......
    Whatever the case.....be sure that your seed dealer knows exactly what your talking about, because in my case I found that they had different idea's of what I was wanting.......I had to send back , and have them re-order at least a couple of times.
    Like perennial clovers, you would have to give this stuff a little time to get established in order for it to do well.........I think I would like it to be at least a foot tall before putting anything on it.
     
  6. Kaye White

    Kaye White New Member

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    Ya, know...whim... this made me think :really..OUCH! I wonder if the tannin acid, that's suppose to be bad for HC,good for goats, is not diminished when it's fed as dried hay??? Kinda' like oak leaves, acorns, ect...
    Oh,well...I just know, by fecals, that I still need to use a chemical wormer for HC and the goats like the hay. :lol
    Kaye
     
  7. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    Kaye; I know there's research on this plant that I haven't looked at in a while, but I have to wonder in these evaluations, if it was factored in that one reason the goats get less wormy is because they are feeding way up off the ground on this plant . I really don't find heavy worm troubles around here until people try to convert these natural browsers into grass grazers.
     
  8. Kaye White

    Kaye White New Member

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    :rofl Don't you guys just love it when us OCD type get to over-analizing these things?? :rofl
    Kaye
     
  9. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    :twisted I hope I can take that as a compliment......OCD...old collie dog?....over collected dust?........Old cantankerous devil?....... :rofl I usually do well with 3 and 4 lettered words.....I must have had to much wine last night.
     
  10. Kaye White

    Kaye White New Member

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    :rofl Yep, that's me.
    OCD= Obsessive Compulsive Disorder or "dang it that just don't make sense". ;)
    Kaye
     
  11. coso

    coso Guest

  12. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    OCD....well, at least you know what your problem is. I can't seem to get a diagnosis on me from any of these quacks around here. After about 2 visits with them, they usually start taking medication themselves and tell me not to come back. :crazy
    Linda, I swear I'm sorry for leaving the topic a bit, but your county agent may have a lot of info on Lespedeza growth in your area. At one time the state would help with the cost of planting it, because of the value that it had on trying to restore the bobwhite quail population.
     
  13. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I have to wonder in these evaluations, if it was factored in that one reason the goats get less wormy is because they are feeding way up off the ground on this plant .
    .....................

    I asked this also. It's too tall for worms to float up onto with most normal pasture moisture. I did get some to overseed last year and this year with my seed mixture, they had it for sale after the talk at the Bryan coop. I think :) I have identified it in my pasture last year after planting, this year I just did 10 pounds mixed in one pasture to be sure. I keep husband and his brush hog out of my pastures, with most of the grasses belly high, that in itself is going to really help. Vicki
     
  14. Ashley

    Ashley New Member

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    That's what you want for goat food!

    My grandpa was telling me years ago when he had a different herd of goats, he planted kudzu in his field for them.

    They eventually ate the kudzu down to the ground and dug up the roots and ate those too!
     
  15. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    As a personal note; I used to have pretty much unlimited resources in doing research for deer and turkey management and had the land to do it on......I planted about whatever is out there in search of growing bigger deer with bigger antlers......wild peas, clovers, lespedeza's, wheat , rye , sorghum, millets, and you name it. I found one thing that brings interest to me, and that is in the wild, most of these plant are only eaten seasonally for the most part by deer. I find a lot of the same with goats when given the chance......My goats don't like sweetgum leaves except for now, when they are turning reds and yellows, and falling off the trees. Deer really hit my clover fields in the fall, but didn't seem to care for it in the spring. I have some bamboo that grows in my pasture , and the goats love it , but will only eat it in early fall.

    I think you will find similar eating habits with goats on most perennial plants. I'm not at all sure how long a feeding period that goats would have when it comes to lespedeza, but I almost becha it would be late summer to fall.
    Just keep in mind with a bunch of these perennial plantings, that it can take several months to get them established....like with perennial clovers, it can take up to a year before you could really describe it as a substantial food source.
     
  16. Ashley

    Ashley New Member

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    Yes, I know what you mean. My goats never touched the ferns growing in the woods until just recently. Sometimes like like cedar, sometimes not.

    There is some kind of mint weed growing on our property that I hate. It gets really big, like 4 ft tall if left alone and gets real thick strong stems, crowds out grass, etc. The horses never touched it until about October and they ate it all.
     
  17. Qvrfullmidwife

    Qvrfullmidwife New Member

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    Whim asked what was my fiorst thought...was the worm burden lower because of WHAT They were eating but WHERE they were eating, ie up highter ...
     
  18. coso

    coso Guest

    I don't want something that is invasive as serecia is. It will take over if your not careful and kill out your native species. Multiflower rose is the same way USCS thought it would make good fence rows, and it probably would if you plowed your fields every year like in a row crop situation. But it will take over if not controlled, goats love it though. I know the QDMA guys don't like serecia anymore either don't know if it's because of it being invasive or because of the forage quality.
     
  19. Bella Star

    Bella Star New Member

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    I am not really worried about it taking over as we have Bahaya grass in the pasture next to us, the grass seed blows over,the goats dont really care for it and I wore out 4 sets of blades out on my mower this year.... ugh !! There is also a native tall,clump grass that the goats and chickens both wont eat ,so the sericea forage would be better as it would be ate here.

    Thanks Kaye, For the site to order it from ,I also grew some johnson grass from seed I put in my pocket out on a hike and the goats loved it ,I hope to get some growing in my pasture, my goats like wild plums and blackberry vines also and I encourage them to grow. I would like to get a perennial deer mix also to try.
     
  20. Sheryl

    Sheryl New Member

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    Re: forage to decrease the HC worm burdon Johnson grass

    Please don't feed your goats johnson grass. It will kill them!!!!!!! I killed two bucks overnight feeding them a bale of hay that someone had given me that was costal with a bunch, and I mean a bunch of johnson grass in it. I gave it to them at 10:30 at night, and at 7 am they were already dead!. The johnson grass at certain times during growth, when the stems turn red or have a red streak in them are poisonous. When baled in hay, they have a gas, kinda like the sudan has (except you can let the sudan cure for a week and the gas goes away) The johnson grass doesn't cure like that, and the poison stays in the stem. The goats eat it, it causes them to bloat and die. I learned the hard way. I lost two very nice bucks by one stupid mistake. I had been told before that goats couldn't eat johnson grass, but I didn't believe the person who told me. I'm a believer know.

    Sheryl