foot rot-3 month old

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by pokyone42, Nov 30, 2008.

  1. pokyone42

    pokyone42 New Member

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    Okay, none of our 15 does have foot rot. All have good, healthy feet. We have a closed herd. Until......

    We got a buck kid at less than 24 hours old in Sept. I decided to trim his hooves for the first time the other day. One front hoof has hoof-rot. I was shocked, tho probably should not have been. I trimmed very close on that tiny hoof, and then bandaged with hoof-n-heel..... After 2 days, removed the bandage...... hoof was red and he was limping. (shrugs. I know the bandage was not too tight....(He had seemed fine, beforehand.)
    Anyway, I gave him a high dose of antibiotic, in accordance with the Mary Smith book........ and am now using the hoof N heel twice daily. He acts fine. None of our other goats have or have had this.. Did he come with the bacteria? (He was less than 24 hours old when we got him, and so I am convinced he did not catch it here, but possibly picked it up upon birth.)
    He came from what appeared to be a VERY clean farm..... I know his navel was dipped before he hit the ground.... I am thinking now, that this is just ONE more reason for dipping newborn hooves.........
    This poor little guy is just 3 months.. and has an infected hoof...... I am doing the hoof_n_ heal, and gave him the big dose of of antibiotics...... any other suggestions would be helpful... *He is now, since this discovery, completely separated from the herd.) Today, he seems good.. no limping or redness, but am still treating with hoof n heel........ any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!
     
  2. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Na, it's not hoof rot. Goats don't get the bovine kind that you treat with vaccine, and LA200, they get all sorts of other things, like thrush, hoof scald and abscess, and if the foot gets injured by stepping on something the puncture fills with manure and they get rotted areas of their hooves. This also is prevelant if you have wet ground and let them grow their feet between hoof trimming that lets the horn grown down and around trapping manure. If they run a fever tetracycline is the drug of choice, but most of the time if you look at feet at least every month or so, it can easily be pared down. You didn't pick up some dreaded disease from this kid, but what you could have picked up is poor feet. It's hard to deal with poor feet in a buck becuase he then will throw you kids with poor feet also. Is the herd LA'd because you can look at their feet scores. But mostly you learn about bloodlines by having to deal with them :) IF you bolus you might want to do your kids. With the hurricane and the loss of fence, my now bred juniors are going to live in a pen that gives them access to our wooded acreage that gets spongy wet in our winters. So before breeding them I bolused them, which was early for us, but I want to make sure they get the hard feet pill that bolusing gives us. Vicki
     

  3. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    What kind of pill is that?
     
  4. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    I think Vicki is referring to a copper bolus.

    Sara
     
  5. pokyone42

    pokyone42 New Member

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    OH GOOD! Thank you! What a relief!
    :):):)
     
  6. pokyone42

    pokyone42 New Member

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    YES Vicki... we DO copper bolus.. Thank you SO much for the info... I was VERY puzzled about it, as we have no hoof-rot in our herd. It was a relief......... Will bolus this little guy tomorrow.........Thanks again! And, Happy Holidays to all of you, and your caprine pals! :) (Sending a card from our goats to the forum...) ;)