Floppy kid syndrome

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Blue Oak Ranch, Jun 2, 2008.

  1. Blue Oak Ranch

    Blue Oak Ranch New Member

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    I've had a sick doeling this spring - first with a bacterial infection of some sort beginning about 1 week of age, got better, then got floppy kid syndrome, apparently. She is now 3 1/2 weeks old. She is responding to floppy kid treatment, and now has motion in the legs - she can crawl and wiggle along now, but still can't stand or walk on her own.

    Thing is, she is progressing so slowly - she has been more than 48 hours without milk. She's eating a small bit of hay, grass, leaves, twigs, drinking pedialyte on her own etc - but not really enough to support her. Most of what I've read on FKS says to not give them milk until they're moving well - but she's getting skinny and I'm worried about her energy level and the potential for more problems. She's cudding now (3 cud transplants) but when/how much milk can I give her? She's a small mini doeling, about 10lbs or so. Would mixing her baking soda in a small amount of milk help things or harm her progress? How about the pedialyte? Will having that in her belly mess up the milk's curdling properly and cause a relapse? She's pooped a lot today, softer stools, so I know she's now moving things along better. She's finally off the banamine and not grinding her teeth - just not walking.

    I have an e-mail in to my vet asking about IV 1.3% sodium bicarb, but I haven't heard back from him and it's been almost 24 hrs.

    Poor baby's such a fighter, too - she's been more sick than well for most of her short life, and I don't want to lose her.

    Cheers!

    Katherine

    P.S. - thanks, Vicki, for the phone chat the other day - I appreciated it a lot.
     
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    have you used Sue's information and treatments??
    NOTE: she says until kid would take the bottle again so she is giving milk also.
    I am a firm believer in that they have to have that milk.
     

  3. we had a doeling that went floppy on us, earlier this spring. I never quit giving her milk. It was a long, slow recovery...but she did recover. Good luck with your little one.
    susie, mo ozarks
     
  4. Blue Oak Ranch

    Blue Oak Ranch New Member

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    Thanks, ladies... still no word from the vet whether he can do the IV bicarb solution. She's been getting the full run of treatment. I've started her off slowly on the bottle again, and boy, she WANTS that milk (grin). She's getting a pinch of baking soda in a few ounces right now. She WILL make it, darn it!

    Cheers!

    Katherine
     
  5. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Best wishes for you and her.
     
  6. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    If she will take the bottle, then I would feed her small amounts many time a day, if you have the time to do so.. sort of like starting back up with a newborn..
     
  7. Blue Oak Ranch

    Blue Oak Ranch New Member

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    Thanks, girls - she's doing better, but still slow. She can get her back legs up but her front ones she can't stand on alone yet. Though she did lean on the wall and take a few wobbly steps this afternoon - mostly because she saw me coming with that bottle of milk (grin). Vet says I can have the bicarb, sure, but I don't know how to set an IV - and he doesn't have the time (horse vet, mostly...). Time to learn, I guess!

    I think she'll make it, though, unless we have a serious relapse.

    Cheers!

    Katherine
     
  8. pokyone42

    pokyone42 New Member

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    fingers crossed for ya!
     
  9. GypsyRose

    GypsyRose New Member

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    Katherine,

    I am a veterinary technician by trade and all research that I have found indicates using the goats cephalic vein to place an intravenous catheter for the administration of fluids. While I will tell you, I have never ever placed an IV cath in goats, I have placed thousands of catheters in dogs, cats, kittens & puppies (some of them just minutes old). It is my thinking (and those of you with more experience, please correct me if I am wrong) that the concept is the same. I will be more than happy to advise you on the placement of a catheter if you wish to contact me via my email. [email protected]

    Tammi
     
  10. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I think I can see a series of still photos with explinations in our forums future, for goatkeeping101!!!! Vicki
     
  11. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    IV catheters in goats are always placed in the jugular...usually pointing downward, as in horses. Only in absolute emergency is it placed elsewhere. Try keeping a goat from chewing out a cath. placed in this location.
    Kaye
     
  12. GypsyRose

    GypsyRose New Member

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    Well, yanno I was kinda thinkin about the goat chewing the cephalic cath out, but hell I'm new and that is what it said to do according to Duke University. I thought you could just put a huge e-collar on the goat to keep it from chewing! LOL...what do I know....we are talkin goats here, not dogs! :blush :biggrin
     
  13. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    learn something new everyday don't we? :)
     
  14. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    Some small animal techniques work with what are considered "Large animal" (goats,cows,horses,sheep) and some don't. I resort to small animal techniques, if I get in a bind and so far so good. ;)
    The only time I ever remember placing a cath. anywhere else, was in a goat with a ripped throat. The vet didn't want to have to work around the cath. so it was placed in the vein that runs across the hock. VERY slow drip so as not to "blow" the vein. But the victim was kept sedated to restrict movement until she was rehydrated. Cath. was removed and reversal given to "get her on her feet". Ruminents pose a whole new set of challenges when under anethesia...rumen still works, bloat being a problem, working around the rumen when inside, and just generally keeping them alive!
    This is going to be fun...someone I can get technical with and understands.
    Kaye
     
  15. GypsyRose

    GypsyRose New Member

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    I do understand! :rofl and I love the technical stuff, and I love to learn. When I was working full time as a vet tech emergency medicine was my forte! To be truthful, the more I learn about Nubians, and the more I learn about the lack of vets that have knowledge in goats period, the more I am considering maybe getting back into the veterinary field and specializing in goats! The more you girls can teach me medically the more I want to learn. I can't wait to stick my first goat for a blood draw, and to help out medically doing things like that...NOT THAT I WANT SOMEONE'S GOAT TO GET SICK!!!!! Hmmm...maybe after medical transcription school and Vicki's goat husbandry 101, maybe I'll go to vet school and come out specializing in goats....imagine the business I would have. What the heck else am I gonna do with the next 8 years of my life???????
     
  16. GypsyRose

    GypsyRose New Member

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    Kaye,

    what was the sedative that was give with a reversal agent, for curiositys sake?
     
  17. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Lets do that one privately, we aren't going to go down that crazy path again :) Kaye you can explain the crazy part to Tammi!!!

    Vicki
     
  18. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Katherine
    How is your kid doing now??
     
  19. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    :rofl Raise goats!!! That's a full time job with SOME gratification! :rofl
    You DO realize that once you get some...they are worse than any illegal drug you could even think of as far as an addiction???? Bet ya' Vicki didn't tell ya' that one! ;)

    yeah, I'm still waiting on the doses of the injectable bicarb! I'd love to find the dose, since there's a bottle in my cabinet without a dose on the lable! It's in my notes to ask next time I have to bug my goat vet! LOL
    Kaye
     
  20. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I don't think you have to be around me more than a couple minutes to know I have a bad addiction to something :) At least it's goats :) I have a list of things also in which to ask my vet the next time I see her, having had a spring visit other than that stupid Puerto Rico flight and health certificates yet in which to gab. Vicki