Filtering Water

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by CGFarm, Apr 6, 2008.

  1. CGFarm

    CGFarm New Member

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    We have determined that our water is the source of our copper deficency. I'm trying to find a way to economically filter our water. I've checked into some filters but they run about $300 each.
    Anyone have any ideas?
    TIA! Denise
     
  2. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    Don't know much here about filters, but I'm wondering how they work to fix a deficiency?
    Anita
     

  3. CGFarm

    CGFarm New Member

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    It would work similar to a home water filter. They would pull excess iron ect out of the water.
    Does that make sense?
     
  4. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    We have been looking into one for out at the cabin because the water out there stinks to high heaven and it is the sulfur What we found out there is that a water softener works best for that problem. and yep the filters are exspensive.
     
  5. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    We have a pool filter on the water to our house, and then a regular water filter at the sink in the kitchen before the cold water/ice maker. This works really well keeping too much iron in the water. To fix difficency with the water, you would also have to deal with pasture and browse growing in your soil, and local grown hay etc. Vicki
     
  6. CGFarm

    CGFarm New Member

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    Thank you for the pool filter idea. Those are decently priced, but i wasn't sure if they would work properly.
    The source of our copper problem IS our water.
    I have my hay tested now as i had to outsource this winter and purchased some "alfalfa" which was supposed to run 19%. My goats were not doing what i thought they should on it so i had it retested....needless to say that was a waste of money.
    Our land has good levels.

    If i can get the water "fixed" that would at least be a step in the right direction.
    What do you think of running double pool filters , one at the pump, one at the outsource?
    Okay, i just had the thought of what the end of my house would look like with a pool filter attached to it. Boy are the goats going to be looking funny at me. ROFL
     
  7. LMonty

    LMonty New Member

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    A pool filter is going to remove particulates, but its not going to remove metals. I had a pool in SC. New one and new filter. Everytime I had the water tested it came back high copper. If the filter took it out, that wouldnt have happened. I think you need to go to reverse osmosis or some similar system to get metal sout and yes, thats the expensive one. There might be other options.
     
  8. BlueHeronFarm

    BlueHeronFarm New Member

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    Bolusing would be cheaper than any kind of filter. Plus, the iron in your water is probably good for the human members of the family, no? Just my thoughts on it.
     
  9. Beverrlly

    Beverrlly New Member

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    Too much iron in your water isn't good for anything (ask me how I know...) It stains everything and turns to rust easily not to mention the smell! A water softner will work but if you have really high iron levels it will essentially "clog" the water softener. You can "unclog" it with a resin cleaner but you'll have to do it pretty often. Pretty much the only way to effectively filter out iron is to buy a super expensive iron filter for your water supply. I agree...for the goats bolusing would be good but for the house---wish I knew!
     
  10. Ashley

    Ashley New Member

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    What about collecting rainwater for them?
     
  11. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden New Member

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    So are you saying that too much iron in the water is causing iron deficiency? I would love to see some research on that.

    We have VERY high iron in our water. 6 ppm. that pretty much insures that in our toilet bowls where the water sits it is the color of rust. The water tastes like blood. We have a water softener that can't touch it. We've researched and found that the only really effective way to get this much iron out is to have a chlorinating system that turns the iron to sludge. I'm not happy about having to chlorinate the water, means we still won't be drinking it, but I get tired of bringing laudry into town for 5 people every week. The water also leave US dirty too! I hate it!

    As for the minerals in the water being good for humans, the minerals have to be small enough for us to absorb them and not many are so you wouldn't get much if you wanted to drink my water that literally tastes like blood! blech!

    We are using rain water too. we have barrels we collect in by the house and bucket the water out. We will be adding gutters to collect off animal housing so it's closer. They much prefer the rain water to the well water too!

    As you can tell I HATE my water. I would move tomorrow if the right place came up JUST because of the water (and the fact that it's like a pond out there all winter!) ....but then we'd have to find another desperate naive sucker to buy our place like us!

    :crazy
     
  12. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    So are you saying that too much iron in the water is causing iron deficiency?
    ....................................

    No I am saying I know that too much iron in the water is the cause of my copper defficency. Vicki
     
  13. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    IS iron the cause of sulfer smell? the water at the cabin smells awful and I remember in Huntsville the water smell like rotten eggs too.
     
  14. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden New Member

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    Sorry vicki, I meant to write copper deficiency...Why is that that the iron causes copper deficiency???

    Sondra, the sulfur smell I think is not iron. I think it's sulfur or some other mineral. My water sometimes will have a sulfur smell and then sometimes will actually have metallic smell like iron. What's funny (or not) is those few precious months it was running clear (not yellow) it had the sulfur smell. The months previous it smelled metallic. Now it is not only yellow, but it has the sulfur smell! I can't win!
     
  15. CGFarm

    CGFarm New Member

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    Sorry i haven't posted sooner. If i don't respond fairly quickly, my Dad is sick with the stomach flu so i'm running like crazy right now. I would LOVE to do that, but during the summer we pretty much fill the tanks every other day, which would be about 25 gals i would have to collect in a day.
     
  16. CGFarm

    CGFarm New Member

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    I talked with a friend of mine the other day who has a brother in law who service's/repairs/sells etc stuff to hospitals. So i'm trying to get in contact with him to chat with him about what they use at the hospitals and how that would work. Still searching.

    P.S. Thanks everyone!
     
  17. CarlinsDarlin

    CarlinsDarlin New Member

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    Where we live, the well water is very much like you describe, Bethany. Thankfully we have a rural water system now, but I can remember many many trips to town to wash whites as a kid. We had so much iron, in fact that my mom, who is blonde, had to bleach her hair BACK to blonde several times a year or it would be red, just from showering. When the rural water system was finally put in place, everyone ripped out and replaced sinks and toilets - you can't get that rust out. I can sympathise.

    As for rainwater collection, you'd be surprised how much you can collect if you have the right storage containers. Only one inch of rain falling on 1000 square feet will collect 600 gallons of water. Where we live in Arkansas, according to the weather service, gets an average rainfall is about 49 inches a year. Just gathering rain off 1000 square feet (if I had the storage capacity) would catch us 29,400 gallons of water a year.

    One of my long term goals is to set up a whole house rainwater catchment system. We just installed a metal roof, which, for obvious reasons is better than catching rainwater off shingles. That was step one (and something we wanted to do, regardless). We have a small amount of catchment now, for watering the chickens, rabbits and for use in the garden, but I would love to be able to collect enough for the goats (and our own use) as well. I'm always on the lookout for storage tanks. Unfortunately, buying tanks to store that amount of water can get expensive. For now we use 50 gallon plastic barrels to store water, collected from a homemade gutter system just off the top of the chicken coop and storage building. I'll be setting up more barrels and/or tanks as I am able. I have two or three barrels, in fact, just waiting to be hooked up. I'll be working on hooking them up this weekend.

    Here's a good link that you can calculate your own potential catchment.
    http://rainbarrelguide.com/

    Kathy
     
  18. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden New Member

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    We would love to do a rain catch for our house, we do, but in barrels like you said and that's not enough. Our roof is composite so that isn't ideal. My DD has long thick hair and I will sometimes boil rain water and use it to wash her hair with a good stripping shampoo.

    It is such a bear. We were very naive about a lot of things when we bought this house - we had no idea exactly what it meant to have iron levels that high when we read the water test.
     
  19. Ashley

    Ashley New Member

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    Y'all make me thankful we have good well water. We stayed in a cabin south of here once and it had sulphur water, yuck! When I was in Oklahoma, they had really bad iron in the water, and yea, it tasted like blood. The swimming pool was a wierd color too, I can't remember what color though, just remember it looked yucky.
     
  20. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Excellent information Kathy. My husband bought a tractor last year from a man who had a whole water containmentsystem on his shop like you are talking about. He supplies his whole house, the shop and an orchard with the water he collected. Using black huge barells and pipeing they also gravity feed solar hot water during the day to do dishes and laundry, most of the year the water is too hot to use without mixing in cold water. We thought we were self sufficient until we met them! Vicki