FF due Jan 20th

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by togg75, Jan 12, 2009.

  1. togg75

    togg75 Guest

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    My first baby or babies are due the 20th! I felt a bump in her today as I was feeding her on the milking stand!

    She looks great she is slicking up real nice.
     
  2. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    Okay, you lost me. What does slicking up mean? :/

    Sara
     

  3. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    HUH? That's a new on one me? What is *slicking up*?
    Kaye
     
  4. Sharpgoat

    Sharpgoat New Member

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    Is what you are saying that she has a healthy fur coat?
    Fran
     
  5. Necie@Lunamojo

    [email protected] Active Member

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    If you're 'slicking up', it means you're 'getting ready'--'looking nice'. More of a 'guy' term...often used by more, ahem, mature gentlemen. :)
     
  6. togg75

    togg75 Guest

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    Slicking up means that her fur coat has a sheen to it that has been lacking before. The other goats do not have the appearance she does right now.
    I am relating it to the "glow" that a woman gets when she is preggo.....
     
  7. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    um thought you meant her udder was getting shiney :)
     
  8. stacy adams

    stacy adams New Member

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    # Informal To make neat, trim, or tidy: slicked themselves up for the camera. to make smart or fine; spruce up (usually fol. by up).
    –noun

    My Gramps used to call everyone he met "Slick"

    You know, a good daily brushing will do that to their coats also. :)
     
  9. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    Nice thought, but unlikely. :)

    Sara
     
  10. Legend Hills

    Legend Hills New Member

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    Sending doeling thoughts your way. How exciting!
     
  11. mamatomany

    mamatomany New Member

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    How awesome :) I wish it were me...one of my daughters who is 11 said she had a dream one of our goats "D.D." gave birth to two guinea pigs :) Impending birth is on everyone's mind !
     
  12. doublebowgoats

    doublebowgoats Active Member

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    Well, it won't be long! My girls look nice and slick now too. I think it's the extra FAT they're carrying! hehe!
     
  13. togg75

    togg75 Guest

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    That is funny right there. I have her clipped, and feet trimmed. She was off feed today a little this morning, but ate this evening ( some). It seems that the pressure from the babies kicks are causing some pain or discomfort because she will quit eating and her tail will flex. Nothing rhythmic like a contraction.....very sporadic.
     
  14. togg75

    togg75 Guest

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    I know most of you will see this as trivial, but I enjoy sharing and need advice if something I am seeing is bad.

    I finished the loafing lot gate today and I am working on the lights for the milking hut.

    My girl due the 20th is back on her feed and getting bigger! Next up is the French Alpine I have due 27 Feb. She is showing a little bit.

    With this girl being a FF what kind of problems should I be ready for???
     
  15. SherrieC

    SherrieC Active Member

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    with her being a ff she will have longer stages of labor since she's not been "stretched out" before. Maybe though since you are also new you won't notice the early signs of labor? I know to me it s seems like forever for those first fresheners to get down to the business of pushing, and even that takes longer then second and third fresheners.
     
  16. Secondairy

    Secondairy Member

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    Although this is not a problem, knowing the signs of labor is very important, like Sherrie mentioned. Our FF Togg doe finished freshening on the 12th with twin doelings at 1:30 AM. I checked on her with my neighbor in tow at 9:30, and the doe was more vocal. Normally she grumbled a bit when I went around the corner to feed the rabbits, but at that time whenever I turned my back on her she would practically scream. This is not normal behavior for her. By 10:30 she was "stargazing" - staring off into space, and was making small noises and looking at her sides a lot. She would stretch her neck and cock her head and one ear to the left or to the right, and hold the position for a few minutes before yawning and continuing to lie down and get up.

    [​IMG]

    She became more posty in her rear leg set (preparing the doe with a dairy clip not only helps keep the milk clean, but also lets you see everything better). Normally this doe has very nice angulation to her thigh. I also noted with red lines, that you can see how her rump angle changed, and also in the triangular area, the kids dropped, and she became hollow under her loin. Her tail ligaments were gone for 2 days - and the tail angle changed only once she was really thinking about getting down the business. She kidded 10 minutes after taking this picture. Also, when the kids change position, it almost appears that your goat is suddenly no longer pregnant.

    Problems to be prepared for would be bad presentations, stalled labor, hypocalcemia, and stuck kids. Bad presentations can be simple, such as a kid coming with both hind feet first, or in the dive position, but upside down. A good way to know what end is presenting is to bend the legs. If the leg joints all bend in the same direction, then it is a front leg. If they bend in opposite directions like a Z then it is a hind leg. A front leg and a head at the same time means going in, pushing the kid back and finding the other leg. Get the head between the legs, and continue to proceed. Sometimes two kids will present at the same time, and then it becomes a daunting task of separating them, pushing one back, and delivering the first. My Togg mentor was worried about bad presentations for me because in her 30 years of goat dairying, the Toggs gave her the most problematic kiddings, followed by the Alpines, and lastly, her LaManchas were always easy.

    Since I have not yet experienced a stalled labor or hypocalcemia, I will let others with experience offer their solid advice here. I am on my way out the door anyway! The meat goat is ready for pick up:)

    Kelly :)
     
  17. Legend Hills

    Legend Hills New Member

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    Another way you can tell if what you are seeing is front legs versus back legs is by the way the toes are pointing. It they are pointing up, you've got front legs. If they are pointing down, you've got back legs. :)
     
  18. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    Kim, that isn't always true. You are not taking into consideration the position of the kid. What about an upside down kid with it's belly facing up towards the does spine? A more accurate statement would be: front legs have knees, back legs have elbows.

    I also think you generally aren't 'seeing' anything... rather you are feeling.

    Everyone please read through Vicki's Rearranging Kids thread in GK101 before your does start kidding!

    https://dairygoatinfo.com/index.php/topic,1351.0.html

    Sara
     
  19. Legend Hills

    Legend Hills New Member

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    Thank you Sara. Yes. That is true.