Fescue- Pregnant does

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Ashley, Nov 24, 2008.

  1. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    I can't remember about the fescue, is it the last 2 months or last month of pregnancy you shouldn't feed it? My does are three months along and I can't get my hay that I have reserved yet and need to pick up some from the feed store to get me by for a while. They have a fescue mix hay, this would be half their hay, the other half I will feed alfalfa. I would feed straight alfalfa but it's $9.50 a bale. :nooo

    That stupid hurricane flooded our outbuilding and the humidity made almost all my hay somewhat dusty. I've been picking out a few clean bales for the goats, but can't seem to find anymore. I have some really nice round bales reserved, but they are down south a ways and I can't get them yet. I got lots of cow hay though. :really
     
  2. coso

    coso Guest

    Ashley, If the fescue is cut before it heads out, the less toxicity it has. If it is cut at maturity the more toxicity. I'm feeding grass hay right now along with my alfalfa. It has some fescue in it but mostly orchard grass and wild grass and I cut it early. If it is straight fescue I might worry especially if you don't know when it was cut. Almost all the fescue fields in the Ozarks have the KY 31 fescue in them which carries the endophyte. Some folks have planted the new varieties. But the way I understand it they are not as hardy in drought. The endophyte actually makes the KY 31 more hardy in drought conditions. I know this is not really an answer. I would try to find some bermuda, or orchard grass, or even bluestem and would try to steer clear of straight fescue.
     

  3. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    We are going to end up going to a different feed store, and they only have bermuda hay. It's 2 dollars more a bale though! GRRR. It just blows me away to spend 7.50 on bermuda hay. The stuff I bought earlier this year was very good and 2.50 a bale.

    Yes, much of our field is fescue. We've had cattle on it plenty and never any birthing problems, but it does well in drought so must have the fungus, but not so much to cause a problem I guess.
     
  4. coso

    coso Guest

    The fungus restricts blood flow. You will have cattle that tails fall off on. Cattle that stand in ponds( it causes a low grade fever) even in cooler weather. Cattle that have feet problems. If your pastures are diluted enough, with other grasses you don't usually see these problems. Excessive fertlizer also is supposed to magnify the problem.
     
  5. Haglerfarm

    Haglerfarm New Member

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    If you have fescue pastures you can overseed with clover. this helps a great deal. Where I am at fescue is what is in most pastures. Putting clover has helped. Unfortunately the droughts the last 2 years have killed it and I will have to seed again.
    My Co-op carries a cattle mineral, that I have used, that has something in it to help counteract the effects of endophyte in the fescue. I can't remember what it was. It did seem to help though.
    I have also heard of something that can be put in feed. I cannot remember what it was and have not been able to find out what it was. I know I read something about it.
    Les
     
  6. coso

    coso Guest

    In the fescue minerals around here they have upped the amounts of Selenium and Vitamin E to boost the immune systems of the animals. Effected animals tend to have weakened immune systems. The mineral usually has CTC in it also, which combats the low fever, and helps with pathogens.
     
  7. Haglerfarm

    Haglerfarm New Member

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    I have also read that upping Vit. C helps. I guess with the immune system?
    I must admit some of this is the first I have heard of. I was thinking it was more of a problem because it interfered with the animals getting everything from the food they ate. I know I have to feed more grain compared to others to keep my animals in good shape.
    Les