Fecal pictures from kid and questions

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by trob1, May 28, 2008.

  1. trob1

    trob1 Guest

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    I am usually just a reader and not a poster here but today it was time to start cocci prevention on triplets and I got lucky this morning and one pooped while I was out so I ran a fecal and this is what I saw and there were quite a few. Is this cocci? or something else. I have seen cocci on a slide last year but they clearly had the polar cap and these do not. The picture is with the 40x lense and these were smaller than the normal stomach worm egg I found on this doelings dam today. What do you all think.

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  2. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    Yes, those are cocci.
     

  3. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    Yep...I agree. .....and those are way to many to see in one view IMO. You may need to go to treatment level first, and then prevention level in the future.

    Whim
     
  4. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    agree with Whim
     
  5. trob1

    trob1 Guest

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    Thanks everyone I will do the treatment now instead of just prevention. I had heard that cocci was a problem in my area lately due to the wet weather. I will redo fecals after the treatment and see how well it worked. Thankfully no one has any symptoms of cocci and I did fecals on the adults and they are clear with the exception of a stomach worm or two.
     
  6. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    Whim, I saw you said in another post that you do fecals, and give cocci meds as needed. How many cocci are too many?
     
  7. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    1 st ......you heard right about the cocci numbers starting to jump in the deep south. So far mine are OK here, but have ran some fecals for other folks lately that had very high cocci counts, and their goats had symptoms with it. Worms so far have been mild around here, but I know that can change at any time too.


    2 nd.....Too many cocci ?

    My vet says that he hates seeing any cocci in any animal under 6 months of age.
    Now for me it all depends on the age of the goat more than anything. From weaning age until about 6 months, I really don't like to see over maybe 8 or 10 on a 1inX1in cover slip area. I can see 6, 8 , or less, then I don't get to worried. 8, 10 , or more, and I start checking more often. Anything over about 15 total in that 1x1 area, and I will most likely go to treatment.
    One kid that I looked at last week had something like 80 to 100, and was very loose stooled. 5 days of hard corid was what I recommended to them, and I don't mean dumping some in their water bucket.

    On my aged or adult goats, I seldom see over 6 to 8 cocci at any time ....and that appears to be "normal" here. I guess if I ever see a high count on an older goat, it would be a clear indication that the goat is "off" in some manner, and it would do to look a bit further to see if something else is stressing the goat too.

    Now, you ask me, so I told you what works for me. But if you will listen to these folks who have been in this for several years, they will tell you to use prevention and not to skip it. ......and if you want to be the highest percentage safe, you will follow their advice. That would be my advice to you also.

    Understand this about mine here. I'm here all the time. I spend hours with my goats every day. I run fecals more often than I need to. I know every goat out there like the back of my hand. (I only have 7 right now) . If one of them poots funny, I know about it. I usually watch mine in the morning after feeding until I see each one of them poop, and see what condition it is in. This is a critical time of the year for these young and upcoming kids, so I even watch them closer now than I was a month ago.

    My method of preventing a severe problem of sorts is a little different than most folks have time for. My method allows me to catch a potential problem before it gets to the point of being out of hand, and then is hard to treat.

    Get to know your goats inside and out, and you will be able to spot something going wrong. Know what is "normal" with each one, and you will be operating at a very high level of homemade prevention most of the time.

    I've tried to post this reply with a great deal of caution in it. Please take the advice of these folks on DGI with much more experiance than I. As you learn more on how to manage your herd at the place that you live....you can develop your own way of doing things too.

    Whim
     
  8. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    Thanks for the info Whim.

    I too am here all day and spend a lot of time with my animals. I usually feed and watch them for a while when they eat. We also take the goats for a walk each day and that's about an half hour to hour long walk, so I usually see everyone poo (especially Toggy, I've never seen such pooping :blush). When it's fecal time, I grab a few Zip locks before we leave. Mainly I walk them because I want them to get exersize for their own health, and because I'm trying to save my hay (plus I believe the browse to be much healthier), but also enjoy just watching them eat and run around. So yea, I keep a good eye on the goats. I just have a few, so I'm able to give individual attention.
     
  9. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    As you learn more on how to manage your herd at the place that you live....you can develop your own way of doing things too.
    ..............................

    Thanks Whim that is exactly what this forum is for. Do it our way until you gain enough knowledge to tweak it for your area, and then share share and share some more what you have learned! Vicki
     
  10. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    Thanks Vicki......I try, but it scares me to talk in exacts with different breeds of goats located in so many different places, with so many different obstacles to face.
    I would rather talk with Diane about killin chickens and stuff.......You really don't have to worry about treatment after they get the axe.
    I sure do appreciate all the folks who help straighten some of my post for me at times. Some need it.

    ;) Whim