Dry cold weather and parasites?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Amanda Lee, Jan 16, 2009.

  1. Amanda Lee

    Amanda Lee Member

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    I remember reading years ago that in dry cold weather that is the best time to rake the pastures to ***help*** kill off parasites in the horse's manure. Raking would turn over manure piles...thus breaking up the manure and then expousing it to sunlight.

    Would this hold true for goats?
     
  2. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    No, unless it's a deep freeze. The eggs, larve and occysts are actually barely under the top of the soil, with moisture they can move from the soil up into the grass to be eaten. So burying them by raking or disking doesn't affect the lifecycle.

    You have to have a freeze or if you live on pasture, than cattle can vacume up alot of parastis after the rain....BUT, you then have short mowed pastures that actually cause more parastie issues than tall belly high grass that parasites can't crawl up into.

    Now discing can improve your pasture, let it get a jump on weeds so spring grass grows agressively and chokes out weeds. As long as you don't have too many goats that they eat the pasture down to mown grass heighth...or the heighth of the puddles or dew on your place, then goats living on tall grass, tall weeds and brush are fine. Vicki
     

  3. Amanda Lee

    Amanda Lee Member

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    Vickie the ground here has been frozen soild for 3 days! It feels like you are walking on concrete. I think it is more about flipping over and breaking up the manure to exspouse the eggs to the cold.
    We do cut our pasture down at least once a year BUT we do that because of Chiggers (red bugs). That help control them so my horses and I willn't get eat up!

    We do disk our pasturs in the fall when planting rye grass, winter wheat and oats for winter grasses.
    Thanks
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Other than maggot eggs from flies, once they or horses or cattle poop out manure, all parastie eggs and larve evacuate the poop and go into the soil.

    This is why you have to watch the poop fall from the animal to take a fecal, you can't just go out in pasture and pick up poop that is even hours hold and use it for a sample.

    There was an ad in the boer goat publication about field testing parasitees in your boer goat herds, collecting samples in the grass all over pasture...it was the talk of the forums! What idiots.

    Just know that it's why we have the parasties we do, pasture grass, it's unnatural for goats to eat with their heads down. Vicki
     
  5. Amanda Lee

    Amanda Lee Member

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    Just know that it's why we have the parasties we do, pasture grass, it's unnatural for goats to eat with their heads down.

    Vickie,
    I get it now! Horses eat with heads down...they are lawn mowers! I had not thought of it in the different ways a goat eats vs. a horse. That combined with where the parasite eggs are. That makes perfect sense now. Thank you so much!