Doe got in feed room

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Jacquelynn, Dec 20, 2008.

  1. Jacquelynn

    Jacquelynn New Member

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    Hey all,

    I have a doe that got in the feed room this morning. She did not seem to be feeling the best so we gave her Pepto Bismal, Nutri-drench, and Probios. Tonight she is not very responsive. Laying down and groaning. The vet said to give more pepto, electrolytes, and Penicillen. Any help?! Someone told us to give banamine but the vet said it would give her ulcers and not to use it.

    Thanks!

    Jacquelynn
     

  2. Necie@Lunamojo

    [email protected] Active Member

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  3. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Nothing you have given her is going to help. She needs to be oiled up, and it has to be tubed, take her to the vet if you don't know how to tube. Adding backing soda to it is fine. With grain you are lucky if it causes frothy bloat, building up gas, because you can kill the gas with baking soda, the real problem with grain is that it settles into the rumen, is soo much that the rumen can't chrun it, so it impacts...this builds up acids and it kills all the villi...finger like projections on a sea anemone, and kills the good bacteria in the rumen. Once she can not pass this mass, they loose their body temp from not having a healthy rumen keeping them warm, and they die....or the acids eat through the lining of the rumen and they die of speticiemia, or give up and die from the pain before then.

    There are two modes to take with this...wait and watch, but if you guess wrong and they ate more than you thought or impact than there is really no treatment except expensive surgery. So if you choose to treat right away, fill the rumen with oil, it may be up to a quart of oil that is needed. You want to drown that grain so it can pass.

    Using Thera Bloat or Bloat Guard with the oil works really well. Vicki
     
  4. hsmomof4

    hsmomof4 New Member

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    From this topic: https://dairygoatinfo.com/index.php/topic,26.0.html

    If it overate grain:



    A) IMMEDIATELY get out the baking soda! Put several tablespoons in a glass, mix it with warm water (you have to keep shaking it or it will settle quickly) and add a bit of molasses to make it taste better. Dose it, in a large dosing syringe if you have one (with the long, open end on it) or a turkey baster, holding the goat's head up so it will swallow, and administering just small, swallow-sized mouthfuls, allowing it to swallow after each dose. You don't want to give it inhalation pneumonia! The baking soda is critical here, because fermenting grain in the rumen creates acidosis, which will do irreparable damage to the goat and end in killing her if you allow it to happen. Repeat this process every 2 hours or so, for several times if she ate a whole lot of grain, and for just a couple of times if she ate a moderate amount.



    B) In the time between the baking soda dosings, give her lots of Pepto Bismol, also in a dosing syringe, to coat the intestinal walls that will otherwise quickly be damaged by acidosis.



    C) Give it a good dosing of oil, as with Part A under Grass Bloat above.



    D) Give it a preventative shot of Clostridium Perfringens Types C&D ANTITOXIN (NOT toxoid!) as in Part B under Grass Bloat above.



    E) Give it some antihistamine tablets (chlorpheniramine, 4mg, several tablets) as in Part C under Grass Bloat above.



    F) Whatever you do, do NOT offer ANY grain for the next few days, and introduce the goat back onto it slowly once you start again. My preference, for the next couple of meals, would be to provide fresh browse from the yard, choosing the new growth of those plants that I know are safe for goats, and that they love.
     
  5. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    You need to listen to Vicki and act fast no waiting around or you could lose the goat.
     
  6. Jacquelynn

    Jacquelynn New Member

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    Thanks for all the help and info,

    The vet came around 1:00 AM yesterday. He dosed her with mineral oil and gave her banamine. However, we ended up losing her during the night. We have never had this problem before, (I've had goat for 10 years), and I was not prepared for it and did not get her help soon enough. I will know what to do if it ever happens again, (hopefully not). Everyone else who got in either has shown no problems or a little scouring, which is being treated. Again, thanks.

    Jacquelynn
     
  7. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Oh am so sorry Jacquelynn this is a hard lesson learned and believe me we have all been there at one time or another.
     
  8. Bethany

    Bethany New Member

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    I'm really sorry you lost her Jaquelynn... :(
     
  9. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    I'm so sorry you lost her. That happened to me a few years ago. I'd left the goats loose in the yard to eat weeds and one doe got back into the garage and into a bag of goat chow. I didn't realize she'd eaten very much and realized it when she became really sick. At the time, we didn't have this forum and all I knew to do was give baking soda and probios. Since she didn't look bloated, I didn't tube her with oil. I realize now that her rumen must have become acidic and she got entero. I now keep a bottle of antitoxin in my fridge and am more faithful about giving vaccinations. I also shut the garage door tight if the goats are out. Kathie
     
  10. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Keeping thera bloat or bloat relase/guard on hand is essential. So is activated charcoal. Of course banamine, it's sort of like me trying to remind folks to use b vitmains, it's just such a given for me I will always forget to give directions about using banamine or b vitamins. Vicki
     
  11. Necie@Lunamojo

    [email protected] Active Member

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    Awww, Jacquelynn, I'm so sorry you lost her. Glad the others are all ok.

    Vicki, this may be a stupid question, but...hey-that's what I'm here for. :) If caught soon enough, like in the act of eating the grain or immediately after, would giving syrup of ipecac (or something else) to induce vomiting help?
     
  12. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Goats can't vomit, if you tried they would drown. It's not a stupid question it was a question I asked my vet when I was new. Goats can burp up cud from the rumen and then sling their head (slinging cud) but they can't open the esophageal groove and puke like we can. It's why in goats syringing large amounts of fluids in them with a syringe is dangerous, the idea you will not get something in their lungs is highly unlikely. If you watch your goats drink from their water, they cock their necks which opens the grove and the water floods passed the rumen into the...OK I think it's the reticulum or maybe the massum anyway one of the 4 chambers of the stomach. Only little kids are monogastric in which only one chamber is working and they can throw up milk and it will come out their mouth and nose. Vicki
     
  13. Haglerfarm

    Haglerfarm New Member

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    I had a doeling and others get into my feed room when my hubby did not latch the door.
    I gave soda and Probios right away, but not enough.
    The next morning they seemed OK so I went ahead and went to my goat club meeting in anothet town. When I got home the doeling was down. I took her in to the vet who kept her. She died during the night. Another grown doe had runny green diarrhia the next day and her rumen was slow and sloshy.
    She was given a big handful of soda (about 3 T) 2 or 3 times a day. Some penicillin. (and C&D antitoxin, if I had had it. I keep it always now). Plus 30cc of Probios 2 or 3 times day. It had mineral oil in it. Made sure she had lots of fresh water and only grass or stemmy type hay. She came right around.
    Another time I had a doe within 2 weeks of kidding who was thin. I was going to start bringing her onto the milk stand to feed her a little extra. She was fed only 1 cup of feed and the next morning she was down and not able to stand. I gave her a dose of C&D antitoxin.
    I took her in to the vet. My normal vet was not there. I told him what I thought it was, acidosis. I could tell by his treatment that he thought it was pregnancy toxemia. So I let him do his thing. After which he finally said, I think you are right.
    So he told me to give soda and Probios. I insisted on bringing in another doe and he pulled some stomach contents with a tube and tubed it into her. It jump started her rumen. by the time I took her home she was able to stand a little. He said it hurt, like a runners legs, from the lactic acid of the acidosis. And could burn her rumen.
    Anyhow, I gave her soda 3 times a day, plus the Probios and thiamin. She ate her hay and drank her water. I would get her up each time I checked on her. It wasn't until a younger doe got in and headed to her hay that she jumped up and butted her that she stayed on her feet. She did just fine and kidded with no problems with lovely kids.
    I am a firm believer in soda, C&D antitoxin and Probios.
    Les