Disbudding

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Carolyn, Jul 23, 2008.

  1. Carolyn

    Carolyn New Member

    339
    0
    0
    DD2 found a product that has lanacaine(?) and lidacaine (?) in it. She thought it might be good for using before disbudding. DD's know it has to be done and it doesn't take much time, but they haven't done very many of them and it still makes them feel bad. Are goats allergic to these? Anyone else use something? Carolyn
     
  2. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    Disbudding is not that big of a deal. It is worse on the humans than the goats. Within minutes of disbudding my babies are running around head butting one another and drinking from the lambar. It isn't anywhere near bad enough to necessitate the use of sedatives or pain blockers. It is a routine procedure; think of it as such.

    Sara
     

  3. rg1950

    rg1950 New Member

    127
    0
    0
    We disbud all our babies using a dehorn iron. It is an unpleasant experience for them and us both, but only lasts about 2 minutes and its over. They never have to worry about getting caught in a fence and we don't have to worry about being horned in the head by accident. Plus they are less likely to hurt each other. We follow up the dehorn with furall spray. They have never had any lasting effects and we have never lost a goat from dehorning. We dehorn all our kids. (18 born in 2008). We do have a few goats with horns, but they come to us that way and were way to big to dehorn by then.

    The first time we dehorned, we had a bag of ice ready to put on there cause we didnt want them to hurt. Both these goats ended up with really ugly long scurs and we learned ice was the worse thing we could do. It cooled the hornbud off before it was fully dead. Now we know how to do it and have not had a goat with ugly long scurs since. We do all their procedures at the same time on the same day, including tagging (or tattooing), dehorning, cdt, and banding (if they are unregistered billies for show wethers). It always goes smooth, and the goat still loves us the next day. :D

    Tara
     
  4. mill-valley

    mill-valley New Member

    1,045
    0
    0
    There are some people who use local blocks for dehorning, but I'm not one of them. For one thing the most common drug, lidocaine, stings when it goes in, so it seems that it causes discomfort on it's own. Also, goats are very sensitive to lidocaine so you have to really watch how much you use, you can kill them by overdosing. Anything topical isn't going to help much as it won't numb all the tissue, just the top layer. You'd have to use something injectable.

    Dehorning is of course painful....but like Sara said, they are up and about within a few minutes and I've never had one act down for more than a few hours.
     
  5. Carolyn

    Carolyn New Member

    339
    0
    0
    This is what I thought, it really only takes seconds and it is done. I had horned goats when I started out, never ever again!!! I am glad to hear about the bag of ice though. Thanks Carolyn
     
  6. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

    1,837
    0
    0
    Also...IF you just have to use something topical...(it makes some people feel less guilty about disbudding?) then use a "powder spray", like Furall instead of the goopy, gooey pastes,aloe, etc. It's best to keep the area dry to build the scab.
    Kaye