DHIR Testing clarification, please

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by baileybunch, Nov 30, 2007.

  1. baileybunch

    baileybunch New Member

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    Yes. I have my DHIR information from ADGA. What's the saying? "Clear as MUD!" :biggrin Can anyone please explain the options (test plans?) to me in normal, new-to-dairy-goats, language?! Gosh, I have so many questions. Nothing seems comprehensible to me at all!

    Which plan would you suggest for someone with a small herd (3-5 does)?

    Our breeder has invited us to participate in her one day test in May. What will we be doing? What do I need to bring? How does that figure in to earning a *? I see the charts total milk production but is there a per day comparison somewhere?

    What is the owner/sampler? How hard is it to do?

    How hard is all this to do? I have one doeling who's mother is *10 and would like to try to get our doeling's star. I heard from the breeder that it won't happen as a first freshener but I thought to get experience we would participate anyway. I have a 2 freshener and another ff that I'd like to test. I figure I should do the simplest test possible until I figure it all out. ;)

    Thanks!
     
  2. Knotneer

    Knotneer New Member

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    You can ignore all the plans that involve timers. :) The three common plans for goats are:
    DHIR 20 Standard- A DHIA tester comes to your farm every month or six weeks, weighs every milking from every doe in the morning and again in the evening, and takes samples for butterfat, protein and somatic cell testing. The tester brings all the stuff, all you need is reg. papers for your does and some $. Paperwork for *M goes to ADGA automatically. You don't need a Verification test unless you might have Top Ten. This is the plan I use. I started with 4 does on test.

    Owner Sampler- You buy the DHIA scale, dipper, sample vials, etc. You weigh your own milkings on test day, take samples, and mail in the samples & the milk weights to the lab. My tester sometimes picks up the samples & info from her O/S herds to mail in. You have to do a verification test- three milkings over 36 hrs with an official DHIA tester- when your does are between 2 & 5 months fresh. You also have to mail in doe sheets to ADGA to get the *Ms. I know there are O/S herds here on DGI who can give more info.

    Group Test- At least 3 herds must be in the group. One person from each herd has to take DHIR tester training. The group has to buy all the stuff like scales etc & they take turns going to each other's herds & doing the weighing and taking samples. All paperwork has to be mailed into ADGA. A verification test has to be done by someone not in the group. (Anyone who actually does group can give you more info)

    The one day test is the same as a verification test. Three milkings are weighed, 12 hours apart. The first one is to "set the clock", the last two are the "official" ones and are sampled. You have to bring registration papers and probably should clip & clean ears as tattoos will be checked. Your does have to stay overnight on the premises. The tester fills out the paperwork & forwards it. ADGA uses a formula (it's in the guidebook) that give points for # of milk, butterfat, and stage of lactation.

    Plan 20 isn't hard at all. The main difficulty I've had is getting reg# right since the format is different than cattle. I think it's harder to get a *M on one-day than on a regular plan, but most first fresheners who are on a DHIR plan should get a *M.
     

  3. Agape Oaks

    Agape Oaks New Member

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    I'm STILL struggling with getting their numbers right! I keep getting those darn error sheets from USDA & emailed back & forth with someone who got everything corrected one month, but the next month they were all wrong again. Is there some secret way of getting the numbers right? To top it off, I'm also on test for AGS & a few of my does are only registered with AGS (old does who would need a new tattoo to get registered with ADGA ).
     
  4. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    I had planned to go on test this past year, bought up all the equipment needed and so on. I seemed to have gotten to much other stuff going on, so decided to pass this time. But, I found while lining my ducks up, that Langston U. has a milk test program that is more set up for goats and the paper work is much easier to understand and fill out. Now I didn't go on test with them , so I don't know how well their service is.....but I can tell you that they were very freindly and helpful in helping me get set up to test. My mail, email, and phone calls were responded to every time, and sometimes on the same day.
     
  5. Knotneer

    Knotneer New Member

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    The reg # need to be corrected in your tester's computer and/or your lab/processing center. Otherwise they will keep sending the wrong # to the USDA every test.
    If the reg # were entered wrong, the sire & dam reg should be checked because they are likely entered wrong too. And if the sire/dam # don't match what the USDA has on file, their computer will kick it back too.
     
  6. Agape Oaks

    Agape Oaks New Member

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    I did the corrections but obviously I'm not doing it in whatever format they want as it got kicked back again. I'll attempt to correct it again with this months test.When I corrected it, I just used the same registration number that's on the ADGA (or AGS ) registration....I did find out that AGS registered animals get a "20" inserted into the number. Not sure what was wrong with the corrections
     
  7. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    call or email Pat and ask her.