Cut castration & fecal samples... another day on the farm :)

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Secondairy, Aug 22, 2008.

  1. Secondairy

    Secondairy Member

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    Yesterday we had the vet out, but had to call the cow guy in because ours was on a leave of absence due to knee replacement. I met him a few months ago when my mechanics wife called me in a panic because her neighbors yearling Hereford heifer had a calf stuck for more than 12 hours and was not making progress. I went in the cow and felt that her hips were not wide enough to allow the calf to pass. The calf's head was not in position, it was laid back over the shoulder, but we made no progress when trying to push it back in and get the head into position - she was contracting very hard ever time we tried. Anyway, the vet came out and I thought he was marvelous - he is a dairy man himself, and really enjoyed hearing about my goats. I assisted in delivering the dead calf, and unfortunately, he had to take the calf in pieces because the heifer just did not have the space She was accidentally bred by a very large Angus X bull.

    The vet took our fecals that we took ALL day in collecting. I swear they knew we wanted them to poop, and were holding it all in! He did have to manually take a sample from the one doe, and boy did she yelp! Next time I think she will poop when she sees us with the collection bags! He also took our blood samples for our yearly testing of CAE, CL, Jones, Brucellosis, and will be back on Sunday to read the TB tests. We are a TB Free state, but I just wanted peace of mind, and at $2 a head, it is inexpensive to boot!

    I had him do a surgical castration on a 6 month old buckling. We had originally planned to keep him intact and use him as his conformation was very nice, and he had hybrid vigor. We decided that since his dam passed, we would retain his sister instead. Plus I didn't like the quality of his head - he had a roman profile like his half Nubian dam, where as his sister has a straight head. The doeling we thought about selling because she was much smaller than him, and we thought that she would never catch up. Now at 6 months of age, she is only an inch or two shorter than the smallest yearling.

    Here are my big questions...The surgery was performed pretty much the way that I have read about them. However my vet used a mixture of Ketamine and Valium to sedate the buckling to the point of near comatose. He pushed the testicles up, cut the lower 1/3 off, and used clamps to stop blood flow to the cords, and then cut between them. He them tied off the cords with catgut sutures, sprayed the wound with blu-kote, and we waited for him to rouse. He also gave him a shot of antibiotics, as well as a tetanus antitoxin. Little boy was pretty groggy and wobbly for about 15 minutes after he started to wake up, but went on like nothing much happened. He appeared to be a little sore today, but otherwise just fine. I want to know if there is anything that I should look for as a sign on budding infection? Our fair begins on Sunday and we are away for the entire week, except when we come home to do animal chores between 10PM-12AM, sleep until 5AM, and then head to the fair to strip stalls when the manure truck comes around at 7AM. We wont be home most of the day, and will only have a few hours each night to check on stuff. My neighbor said that she will come though and check on animals mid afternoon, but I don't really know what to tell her to look for, except depression, leaking of the wound, or a bad odor. She already thinks he stinks bad enough, so I don't know if she will be able to detect the smell of anything else.

    I also have a small bit of PA Dutch folklore to tell as far as castration surgeries are concerned. It is pretty interesting, and tomorrow when I have more time I will post it for everyone. It's quite humors, and may just be a bunch of old superstitions, but after hearing it from the Doc, you bet I will be doing this form now on!

    Kelly :)
     
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    I just would take his temp from time to time thus knowing whether he is developing an infection.
     

  3. Secondairy

    Secondairy Member

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    Thanks Sondra, I know that is a good indication, but of course, I knew there would be something that I would forget! The vet did leave his pik line in case had a complication over the next 3 days. We are supposed to pull it today.

    Kelly :)