Crooked neck in newborn

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by adillenal, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. adillenal

    adillenal New Member

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    It had to be my prize Saanen but we had a terrible time delivering her single doe kid a couple of nights ago. The kids head was turned back alongside her shoulder and we could not get it pulled forward so we finally decided to pull it like it was since we figured it was dead by that time. Not dead but very weak and a neck that has been folded over for some time.

    She can now stand up by herself and can hold her head up BUT the left side of her neck is curved. She likes for it to be massaged it seems. She will go to sleep while I am doing that. Is there anything else I can do to help it straighten out? I can't figure out how to put a splint on her neck. Front legs I use toilet paper tubes but this is different. Her legs are fine.

    When the dam came here she was afraid of the LGD and trying to get away from her, she slipped on the sudan scattered around the hay feeder and fell and I thought she had hurt her hip. She has wobbled around on her backend for the past 2 years. After DH had to strain to pull this kid with me holding the doe so she he could get leverage, she walks fine. No more wobble. Guess we fixed her and it must have been a back problem not a hip problem. She actually ran up to me yesterday. So there is good with the bad.
     
  2. doublebowgoats

    doublebowgoats New Member

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    Wow. That is great about the dam. How curved is the baby's neck? Can she face forward at all? Do you have a vet that could do an xray to see if it is a bony problem or muscle? I would definitely keep up with massage. I would imagine that she will straighten out just fine given some time.
     

  3. adillenal

    adillenal New Member

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    She can look forward, drinks her milk just fine but the neck is very curved like a quotation mark. Although it is not near as big on the left side today as it was yesterday. Probably some swelling involved too.
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Along with the other post we had, you do have to ask yourself, is this about being able to keep something alive because we can, or is it humanely putting something down at birth because the goatling obviously will never be 100% and will not improve your herd, is something you certainly do not want to spending all of your time with just as the herd needs more of your time and energy. It really is my answer to most of these kinds of posts. Will you raise this kid out to eat? Will you raise this kid out to sell to someone? Than isn't the answer really to humanely put it down? Vicki
     
  5. adillenal

    adillenal New Member

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    Why would I put her down if the neck might straighten out? I don't sell kids so she is for my herd and the genetics are there. Her dam is a SGCH and I would hate to throw away the genetics. She could turn out to be my best producer of quality Saanens. Or not. You just never know. And she has no other problems except a bowed neck. She can walk, run, jump and eat. And I can always hope for a straighter neck. And the Occupational Therapist here has given me some ideas for exercises so I am off to start therapy on the little girl. Hope I can come back in a month with good news.
     
  6. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Or you could look at it as, if something as basic as a strong neck wasn't afforded to this kid at birth, what else is wrong? We all have to choose what is and what is not acceptable to breed, register, and put our name on, keep in our herd, but you will get my opinion when you ask on the forum. To keep something that takes physical therapy this young in life, life saving procedures, it weakens the herd as a whole. Vicki
     
  7. KJFarm

    KJFarm Senior Member

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    LaNell, you might try to find an animal chiropractor.
     
  8. poppypatchfarm

    poppypatchfarm New Member

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    Absolutely give her time. Most likely she had her neck bent in that position in utero too long. Ears do the same thing and will come up after getting out of the cramped quarters. I have heard of people putting kids down who were born with bent legs where if given another couple of days would have been fine. Anyone who has been in a cast will know it takes time for those parts to work right again after being confined to a certain position for too long.

    My 2 cents as far as being worth being allowed to be alive that is for the owner to decide. Not everyone has the same ideas when it comes to a life's worth. I understand for many goats are strictly livestock but for others maybe they just enjoy having goats without always looking at the bottom line. We have a doe who was born without a neck, her head basically sits on her shoulders and her face is slightly crooked. She was smashed during development. Our vet adores her. She showed us how to draw blood from her leg since we don't have a neck to work with. "Precious" will be two this Spring and I don't know of a happier more loved little goat who has no idea she is a little different...or why she is the only goat we allow to sleep in the house. She is a pet who does not make us any profits but if I were into goats for the $ would have quit a long time ago.
     
  9. swgoats

    swgoats New Member

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    A chiropractor might be able to help if it is worth it to you. Sometimes a regular human chiropractor will look at an animal. But I lean more toward Vicki's way of thinking on this issue.
     
  10. buckrun

    buckrun New Member

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    Poppy patch...Smashing or crowding does not determine physical structure.
    That is a developmental issue. The animal is malformed structurally from a developmental mishap -
    not from a physical restraint.
    There is no amt of crowding in a womb that determines developmental structure.
    Lee
     
  11. hsmomof4

    hsmomof4 New Member

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    You're right Lee, though if LaNell's doeling was delivered with her head back, the neck thing could be an injury from the delivery that might be correctable. And it might not. Agreed completely that Poppy Patch's goat is an entirely different situation.
     
  12. todog

    todog New Member

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    la nell, i wonder if the" bucket collar of shame" would work in miniature for your baby.. start with a small bucket. remove the handle, cut the bottom off and split the bucket down 1 side. using duct tape, slip the collar on her neck and duct tape around it. its like a splint. hope this helps.
     
  13. dragonlair

    dragonlair New Member

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    I had a doe kid born that way. I friend decided she wanted to raise her and give her a home for as long as she was comfortable. The doeling lived to be about 6 months old before it started becoming a problem. She was able to eat, run around (she did circle a lot) and did adapt to her disability very well. I had to assist in the delivery because she couldn't make it out on her own. I had to turn her and deliver her back feet first. She was one of triplets, so maybe there wasn't room for her to develop correctly? I know that she had not been stuck in the birth canal so the deformity was congenital. The neck was too rigid at birth for a collar of any type and PT didn't help either. Even the animal Chiro could not help.

    However, at about 6 months she started having trouble breathing. The bend in her neck never got better no matter what therapy the new owner tried. As she grew, the bend was making it hard to breath. The girl made an appointment to have her PTS, but she died during the night before her appointment.
     
  14. Yes, indeed. I'd give it a little bit of time and watch for some improvement. If none is seen, euthanasia might be the best option to avoid what Sully mentioned with the breathing problems.
     
  15. Bella Star

    Bella Star New Member

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    To me this baby would have to be pampered all thru it's life even when grown if it lives as more than likely it has neurological damage if it was crowded in the utero from lack of blood in the development stages but more than likely it has development deformities during embryo and that's due to DNA, I would not do the same breeding again and if your doe kids with another kid like this or worse from another buck ,I would eat the doe but back to the baby kid now that you have, this kid will not be able to play with the other kids as they do a lot of rough playing head butting and then if it reaches full grownjust look at how rough some goats are,if this was my baby .... I would always be protecting it and worrying with it in a separate pen and if that neck stays crooked,you will need to hide it if people come to buy a goat from you , who would want a crooked neck goat ? sooo I go along with Vicki and others here as I think of the goats quality of life as being maby never being able to look foreward ,problems eating from the side that is not natural from a goats stance ,always mostly being alone by it's self so I would put the kid down now and move on ..... We have to be responsible and goats are not humans, just think as a Boer raiser ,I raise beautiful healthy Boers with nothing wrong just to kill and become food for humans and the same thing goes for all animals that becomes food for humans . We have to get over this if we are meat eaters and producers of animals that people eat ! There is lots of beautiful healthy Dairy Goats that get slaughtered daily just for food and so why breed out and force a defective animal to exist and not be able to function as a normal animal such as a goat and be part of the herd that it cant function and do like a normal goat ? Nobody wants a deformed goat . No, I would have put the baby down at birth and me and mama doe would have moved on .
     
  16. MF-Alpines

    MF-Alpines New Member

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    While I can value all these posts after the OP, and they all make sense, I have to agree (with someone who posted), why not give her a chance? Really, what is the cost? Nothing but time and energy. So if LaNell wants to do it, why not? Cripes, it's not ALWAYS about the bottom line. Who's to say that it won't work itself out. Call me Naive, I don't care. I'd go for it.

    We had a buck kid last year, one of triplets, with seriously contracted tendons. The vet was there as I couldn't untangle everyone (although I did before he got here). I asked him, should we just put him down. Even he said no, give him a chance. We tried with all the recommendations that we found on DGI, but a few days later, we did put him down.

    If LaNell wants to try to work this out, why not? Who's to say it is a congenital abnormality? I'm sure she'll know in a day or two whether it's worth it or not, whether what she's doing to work on the problem is working or not. She's not stupid!
     
  17. swgoats

    swgoats New Member

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    The time I tried to rehab a kid, I got too attached. I couldn't put her down. She seemed to have a strong will to live. The night before she died I sat with her a long time, and it felt like good bye. The next day she died. I don't regret it, but I also decided that I wouldn't do it again. Bottom line you got to do what you can live with.
     
  18. PrairieTrail45

    PrairieTrail45 New Member

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    Like Michelle said, I would have an x-ray done to see if the neck is actually shaped that way or if she was just cramped too long.

    I had a kid born one time who was missing the cannon bone in one of his hind legs, just below the hock he just had a little bitty hoof. When he was born the sack did not break open, of course I broke it and found the deformity, the 2nd kid she had was normal and the sack broke before she was all the way out. I put the buckling to sleep as I didn't feel he would ever live a normal life with 3 legs.
     
  19. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Nobody is telling her what to do. She asked for an opinion, you can only base an opinion upon what you know. Read everyones post, make a decision on your own, if she was unsure about what she was going to do she would not have asked. I would come to the forum for support, but certainly not for what I know, for my herd, what has to be done.
     
  20. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    If this were my kid, I'd give her about a week to see if the neck straightens out. If not, I'd consider raising her for a couple months for slaughter, but would not keep her as a pet. I can only afford to keep so many goats and around here, only the best are retained.