Crazy goat questions

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Merry Beth, Jul 25, 2008.

  1. Merry Beth

    Merry Beth New Member

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    Hi!
    I am new here and glad to have the opportunity to talk with experienced goat owners. We have 3 Nubians that we've only had two weeks. They are the culls of a good breeder and very nice looking, healthy goats.
    One of the two that are in milk is giving us fits. We have a milk stand and she puts her foot in the grain bowl, she "sloshes" her feed all over the place with her nose and she is terribly hard to milk due to small teats and orafices so it takes us a while. Seemingly because of length of time it takes she starts dancing around trying to kick us off. This morning she got so carried away she actually fell down.

    We watched her be milked the day we bought her and my dd actually wanted to rename her Patience--HA! She WAS patient and good natured that day.

    My question is, is this a permanent situation or can we expect improvement? She really tests my "patience" and I was thinking that maybe there is a way to train her not to try and kick us off. She is a first freshener and her kid was sold at one or two weeks and I don't think she ever nursed it much. She is a beauty really and I hate to lose her, but it's not worth it to me to have to fight everyday for months or years. ??

    A friend that had goats said one of theirs acted up until they finally got rid of her.

    Something else that might be a clue to her personality is she is quite greedy and loud.

    Thanks in advance!!
     
  2. Truly

    Truly New Member

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    First, :welcome

    My goats aren't able to get their foot/feet into the grain, so I'm not sure how your stand is set up. But my suggestion for that is to remove the grain until her head is locked in the stantion.

    For the sloshing, keep the feed level low.

    For the dancing, hobble her or tie her hind feet down to the stand. I put a cleat on the stand to tie the rope to.

    You have to show any goat who is boss. If they think they are in control, you will always have problems.

    With small teats and orifices, well, that gets better with age, usually.
     

  3. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Goats always test you to see just how much they can get away with. I am very stern with my goats, they have to mind or they are gone, I am 51 and have asthma, I simply can't wrestle with a goat and then do the rest of my chores.

    I would also tie her feet, soon she will give up. The sloshing of feed is her looking for her old food or for something else. When bringing in new goats who are used to sweet feed, and they are given dry grains, they will sift like this. I dont' give them anything else, they soon get hungry enough to stop doing it.

    The small teats will get better with her next lactation, the small stream won't. Do everything you can not to stop milking her, don't let her get away with kicking at you..I slap, a firm slap of the flank and a scream NO...this makes them think NO means pain...soon you do not have to slap them and the NO is sufficient, and then soon the no can be uttered under your breath and they freeze.

    Do try patience in the beginning because she is freaked out with the move.

    Not saying this happened to you, but one of my first goats I purchased was this sweet thing at home that turned into a wild child. At a goat meeting I was talking about her...it was very well known this gal would give banamine to tame down her dam raised kids when she had buyers at her farm. vicki
     
  4. Merry Beth

    Merry Beth New Member

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    Thanks so much for the help already!

    I had read, as has my son, that it is best to be gentle and quiet with the goats. But, I did swat her this morning. I had hoped I wouldn't have to tie her legs...but we may.

    The funny thing is, she did great when I milked her this evening. This morning she acted like she'd gone nuts. I know that one thing wrong is that my son is gone and she is used to him being there. My husband sat out there this PM and she was fine. ??

    Thanks for the word on the medicated goats, hadn't considered that someone would do that. I DO NOT think that is the case with this one. One goat was unruly at his place and she is peachy here. She is the herd queen I think, although it's hard to tell with this herd of goats.

    We had other goats that a neighbor child let out. They got spooked and ran off and they hadn't been here long enough to find their way back. We bought more goats and 3 of the 4 that were lost came home. We ended up giving the first goats to a friend since we didn't want that many goats. (Our place is too small and they weren't the healthiest to begin with. They were cheap tho.) And we bought chain and padlocks for our gates.
     
  5. feistygoatwoman

    feistygoatwoman New Member

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    Not saying this happened to you, but one of my first goats I purchased was this sweet thing at home that turned into a wild child. At a goat meeting I was talking about her...it was very well known this gal would give banamine to tame down her dam raised kids when she had buyers at her farm. vicki
    [/quote]

    This was the first thing I thougtht of. I haven't had this experience with goats, but I have bought quite a few horses when they have given them banamine or ace before we came. They are angels while you are looking at them and you are thinking. "wow! this one is great." Then you get them home and, well, they are not the angel you first thought they were. I would follow the advice above. I would talk to the person I bought her from. See if they have ever had this experience and ask them if she was given anything.- Although, that is just me :D Good luck!!!

    ps- don't feel bad either. My Oberhasli doe is CRAZY of my husband. She isn't as bad for me, but she is pretty hard to milk if you take too long. It's a speed milking marathon to get her done before she looses it.
     
  6. rg1950

    rg1950 New Member

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    We had one that was a FF and we had to go chase her down and drag her into the milk room and drag her onto the milk stand. She kicked, stomped, and sloshed feed. It took about a week of "spanking" her on the flank with the "NO" response, (the same way Vicki does it) and after a week, you couldn't even tell she was ever any trouble. She still tries to slosh the feed out of the feeder, but we are working on that one. We don't put much feed in there. We have one who won't eat unless she sees you dump fresh feed on top of the feed that is already in there, but she does behave on the milk stand. Just be patient, but firm and don't give up. Get her trained this year, and you will be surprised how much easier it will be next year.
     
  7. Merry Beth

    Merry Beth New Member

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    Thanks to all for the suggestions. It really helps my feelings to know I can swat without negative results ;) !

    She did do fine today as well, it seems that a large person leaning into her a bit has helped her calm down.(I was ready to cook her or sell her yesterday when I posted.) We'll work on the food sloshing bit and the foot in the bowl per your suggestions.

    Now, if I could just get her to let down her milk in a timely fashion and if I could grow her some larger "holes" overnight we'd be in good shape.
     
  8. Rose

    Rose New Member

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    When she gets used to your routine of putting her on the stand, giving her feed, brushing loose hair off, washing her udder, etc., her let down will be signaled.

    I also recommend music in the background. Ours like the soundtrack of The Sound of Music.
     
  9. MayLOC

    MayLOC New Member

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    One of my 3 FF this year was a kicking machine on the stand. I had to milk her one handed and hold up the bucket w/the other hand at all times. She just constantly kicked and kicked and hopped ect. Every single time she did it I smacked her(rather hard really and have been known to grab around the tendon in their leg and hold while I milk if they just won't quit jumping). My husband watched our milking sessions w/ wide wide eyes! And it took a full month of that and another of lesser kicking, but now she is my calmest milker! I milk her last now and she is always done w/her grain by the time I get there and she just spreads out for me, turns her head and watches me milk as she chews her cud. Not one kick for at least two months now. I just love her to pieces now! Goats are rather smart and get it, but they always try to test ea. new milker it seems.

    I also use those 8qrt. over the fence feeder buckets for ea. of my milk stand stations, so they cannot slosh the feed around or make a mess at all. None of my milk stands allow for a foot in the food also, maybe you could adapt yours?
     
  10. Merry Beth

    Merry Beth New Member

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    Wow, your stories are really giving me encouragement!! I guess it's not the ornery ole goat, it's the ornery ole goat owners- :lol. Welp, I'm ornery so we ought to make it fine.