Coccidiosis question

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by trnubian, May 21, 2008.

  1. trnubian

    trnubian New Member

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    Ok this more of a thought than a question.

    I was seeing people saying that they were using sulfa's and when their fecals were done there was absolutely NO coccidia oosytes. I got to thining about that and that I usually stop prevention treatment when they are about 5 months to 6 months old because usually by then they have built up an immunity to the coccidia.

    How do the kids build up an imunity to coccidia if they are never allowed to have any in their system? There IS a difference between too much and a little bit though. Too much and you have a sick goat or one that is not able to grow as quickly as his or her pen mates who have lower ammounts of coccidia.

    I know that a lot of us human are becoming germaphobes and use antibacterial and anitviral everything. I thik we are slowly losing our immunities to simple germs this way but I could very well be wrong.

    So my point after all that is, wouldn't you WANT just a very small ammount of Coccida in them in order for them to build up an immunity to them?
     
  2. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    If you fecaled during their 21 days off of a sulfa or corid you would see cocci. The problem when running fecals is you can not distinguish between the harmful blood sucking ruining the intestine life cycle of cocci or the less harmful lifecycles. If you could you would only use prevention when the numbers of the bad guys started to multiply and wouldn't treat when it was just the less harmful lifecycle.

    Nothing is a complete science obviously we do the best we can do with what we have.

    Even during treatment, of the old Corid dose...Deccox M or sulfas I have never seen a clean fecal until this new dose of Corid.

    So in essence you pick your poison and deal. vicki
     

  3. trnubian

    trnubian New Member

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    Hhmmmm I didn't know that that makes sense to me.
     
  4. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    Well, don't you think that even if a fecal is totally clear, there are probably still a few coccidia hanging around anyway? Or no?
     
  5. WeaverRose

    WeaverRose New Member

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    Can adult does get coccidiosis? I just brought home two oberhasli does, both 2 year olds, both freshened in March. One is kind of OK on condition, but thin, but the other is positively bony, she looks anorexic, has a slight swelling under her eyes, has had a kid nursing on her. The gal I bought them from (sight unseen except for photos; stupid on my part, drove 3.5 hours to get them and should have refused the "sick" one) said she worms only with Ivomec; this doe doesn't want to eat, just nibbles on things. I will call the vet in the morning, we just got them home tonight, but I'm really worried about her. Suggestions?
    She doesn't seem to have pale gums or eyelids, kind of hard to tell actually. She sort of reminds me of the survivors of Dachau, in terms of body condition. Horrible. But I guess I was hoping to help her get well, which probably wouldn't have happened at the place I picked her up. :sniffle
     
  6. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    What area? Does who are rail thin coming out of winter are usually riddled with cool weather worms. They do not show up as anemia in goats, they show up in emaciated/ethiopian looking does. On fecal the vet will say strongides, they need worming. Ivermectin will do the trick for us here but it also wasn't overused for those kinds of worms. I would worm them with cydectin 3 times 10 days apart. If they come from a wet ground type area especially with standing water or snails I would also give them at the same time Valbazen for liverflukes and lungworm.

    Start feeding them correctly. Alfalfa, in the form of hay or pellets and slowly start increasing the amount of grain they get, and make it real grain. Do not start changing anything to suddenly they have few rumen bacteria to eat any change in grain.

    Of course test them for CAE and re vaccinate once you get the worms under control.

    Please put your area in your signature or up at your Avatar section so we know your area, helps with figuring out what is happening on your farm. Welcome to the forum! Vicki
     
  7. WeaverRose

    WeaverRose New Member

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    Vicki, thanks for the welcome and for the advice, I'll be doing those things ASAP. They came from near the Ohio/Indiana line, way south, but were originally from Florida.
    They are just the sweetest girls, I hope to get them built back up to good condition, and appreciate all I've learned here - everyone is so helpful and encouraging!
    Thanks - ps my location is southern Indiana, I tried to put it on near the photo, don't know if anyone else can see it.
     
  8. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Perfect! Sherrie C is in your area, you can pay close attention to her mineral program, her worming program and also if she uses bo-se and if she needs to copper bolus.

    Take it slow on the grain.....but alfalfa, hay or pellets should be free choice by 3 weeks, which will help them build back their calcium reserves. Good luck with them, sorry they came in such awful condition. Coming from Florida they also could be small and stunted from cocci. I would put them on a sulfa also, but sadly the damage to them internally could already have been done. Do you have a photo? Cocci damaged stock is usually very thin over the top and carry ethiopian bellies. Vicki