Coccidia : Different Cocci meds and doses

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Sondra, Apr 16, 2009.

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  1. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    DISCLAIMER:

    Off Script / Extra Label is a term that you will see used a lot with goat owners. Since we commonly use meds/wormers that are actually designed for other animals, we often have to go outside of what is put in print by pharmaceutical company's.
    Although many of the wormers and meds listed in this section have been used with success by several goat herders for many years, several of the listings and doses here are being used Off Script/Extra Label.....(which basically means it should be only given under the advisement of a licensed veterinarian). We ask you to take note that the FDA has not approved many of these meds for use in goats, nor have established official meat or milk withdrawal times for use in dairy goats. When we do find milk withdrawals specifically for goats, they rarely are with dosages or routes we typically use.
    We have gathered the information in this section from different goat herder's in the field. This information is only their opinions on what has worked for them in the past.

    Thank you



    40% Albon S.R.
    [Sulfadimethoxine] and Di-Methox 40%[Sulfadimethoxine] GIVEN ORALLY
    are the exact same drug- Just make sure when you look at Albon S.R. (slow release) the mg/ml, they are 400mg/ml. The recommended dose is 75mg/kg or 75mg per 2.2#
    [size=10pt]The dose is 1cc/5# for 5 days as a treatment dose[/size]


    1cc per 5# for day one
    1cc per 10# for days 2, 3, 4 and 5 for a preventative dose. Repeat every 21 days.



    12.5% Albon S.R.
    [Sulfadimethoxine] and Di-Methox 12.5%[Sulfadimethoxine] GIVEN ORALLY are the exact same drug
    [size=10pt]The dose is 3.2cc per 5 lbs[/size]
    Theresa

    Di-Methox Powder

    1 package to a pint of water.
    There's 94,600mgs in one pint of water. 16oz in a pint. 30cc/oz.
    Divide 94600 by 480cc = 197mg/ml. Each cc will treat 2.6#'s of kid and give it the needed 75mg/kg.
    For a 10# kid...3.8cc round that off to 4cc...I don't deal in 10ths orally.
    20#=8cc
    25#=10cc
    30#=12cc
    35#=14cc
    40#=16cc
    45#=18cc
    50#=20cc

    If you mix this concentrated like this...use warm water..make absolutely SURE you get all the powder dispersed in the liquid...and keep it in the AC or refrigerator until you use it all up in 5 days. Toss what you don't use.


    WITHDRAWAL : Di-Methox or Albon
    MEAT 7 days.
    MILK : 60 hours (5 milkings) .

    Corid unlike sulfa's do not kill all lifecycles of coccidiosis. It blocks the ability of the last lifecycle of occyst to move to the harmful blood sucking, intestine ruining adult in your babies intestines. So the kid is building immunity the whole time they are on Corid, unlike feed throughs (if you can find one dosed high enough in grain for goats, even goat speicific meat goat pellets are rarely high enough) sulfa's etc...which kill all lifecycles.

    Corid, depletes the cocci occysts ability to utilize thiamin in the goats system to move to adulthood...IT DOES NOT, unless overused cause thiamin/b1/polio in your goats. And anything, herbal wormers, chemical wormers, electrolytes, Fast Track, grain if given in enough amounts can destroy rumen flora and cause polio in your goat. Vicki
    The dose for Corid is 6.25cc per 25 pounds for 5 days
    So I do not have to sit with my calculator each time.

    weight dose
    5 1.25
    7 1.75
    10 2.50
    12 3.00
    15 3.75
    17 4.25
    20 5.00
    22 5.50
    25 6.25
    27 6.75
    30 7.50
    32 7.75
    35 8.75
    37 9.25
    40 10.00
    42 10.50
    45 11.25
    47 11.75
    50 12.50
    52 13.00
    55 13.75
    57 14.25
    60 15.00
    62 15.50
    65 16.25
    67 16.75
    70 17.50
    72 18.00
    75 18.75
    77 19.25
    80 20.00
    82 20.50
    85 21.25
    87 21.75
    90 22.50
    92 23.00
    95 23.75
    97 24.25
    100 25.00


    and then there is Sulmet which is very ineffective in most areas for the control of cocci.

    ............................................Thank you PJ for the following.......

    Instructions for Corid Powder

    If you then use the following conversion rates (from the back of the packages):

    96 mg of amprolium in every 1 ml of corid 9.6% liquid
    220 mg of amprolium in every 1 g of corid powder (dry not mixed with a liquid)

    Then you get the following table:

    goat 9.6% amprolium 20% powder
    pounds cc's mg grams
    x y (y*96) (y*96)/220
    5 1.25 120 0.5
    7 1.75 168 0.8
    10 2.50 240 1.1
    12 3.00 288 1.3
    15 3.75 360 1.6
    17 4.25 408 1.9
    20 5.00 480 2.2
    22 5.50 528 2.4
    25 6.25 600 2.7
    27 6.75 648 2.9
    30 7.50 720 3.3
    32 7.75 744 3.4
    35 8.75 840 3.8
    37 9.25 888 4.0
    40 10.00 960 4.4
    42 10.50 1008 4.6
    45 11.25 1080 4.9
    47 11.75 1128 5.1
    50 12.50 1200 5.5
    52 13.00 1248 5.7
    55 13.75 1320 6.0
    57 14.25 1368 6.2
    60 15.00 1440 6.5
    62 15.50 1488 6.8
    65 16.25 1560 7.1
    67 16.75 1608 7.3
    70 17.50 1680 7.6
    72 18.00 1728 7.9
    75 18.75 1800 8.2
    77 19.25 1848 8.4
    80 20.00 1920 8.7
    82 20.50 1968 8.9
    85 21.25 2040 9.3
    87 21.75 2088 9.5
    90 22.50 2160 9.8
    92 23.00 2208 10.0
    95 23.75 2280 10.4
    97 24.25 2328 10.6
    100 25.00 2400 10.9

    So, it doesn't matter HOW much liquid you add to your 20% powder solution, that last column is the number of grams of 20% Corid powder you need for the weight of the goat(s) being treated.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 2, 2013
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Re: Different Cocci meds and doses

    Preventive medications such as monensin, lasalocid, and decoquinate, are collectively referred to as coccidiostats, meaning that they slow down the shedding of coccidia into the environment. They are only effective in preventing disease if they are added to the feed before lambs become exposed. On the other hand, treatment medications such as sulfa compounds and amprolium are coccidiacidal, meaning that they actually kill the coccidia organisms in the intestine of the treated animal.
    Rumensin® is very toxic to horses. Bovatec® and Deccox® should not be fed to horses or other equines.
    http://www.sheep101.info/201/worddocs/parasite.doc
     

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