Clumpy berries and no figs

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Merry Beth, Aug 1, 2008.

  1. Merry Beth

    Merry Beth New Member

    114
    0
    0
    Okay, thank you so much for all the info on poop the other day. We haven't been feeding figs anymore but one of our does has still got light-colored, clumpy poop. Now, maybe I'm worried too much about the poop? I was just told that the berries are a sign of intestinal/rumen? health so...

    To remind, they were wormed the 21st and had their last fig the weekend. The fig glutton has beautiful berries. This doe is not as big an eater as the other 2. She grazes more and we don't have much of anything for her to graze on since we are in a drought situation. We have hay free choice--bermuda. They shunned the alfalfa hay I bought at the feed store and the alfalfa pellets as well. That should about cover it.

    Thank you so much, I know you are bored with the poop questions.
     
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

    9,442
    1
    0
    Worms or worm meds can cause clumpy / gluttony :)/ change in feed and the list goes on. I would put out some baking soda give her some probios and just wait and see. How ever I do hope they will start eating the alfalfa pellets. How much grain are you giving them?
     

  3. Merry Beth

    Merry Beth New Member

    114
    0
    0
    I am giving them 1 pound per pound of milk and one pound for maintenance, plus a little in a midday feeding.

    I emailed my breeder and he suggested I have a fecal test done. So, I guess I'll try to do that soon if nothing changes. He's supposed to be getting back to me on the type pellets he buys.
     
  4. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

    9,442
    1
    0
    OH MY GOSH, now for instance if you have a 8lb of milk (gal) milker you give 8lbs of grain????? NO WONDER you have clumpy poop. My heaviest milkers would never get more than 2lbs of grain at any time. Usually on an average the girls here get 1lb of grain on the milk stand only. but do get alfalfa pellets most anytime.

    I agree you need to get some fecal tests done and make sure your wormers are working.
     
  5. Merry Beth

    Merry Beth New Member

    114
    0
    0
    Okay, I THINK I got that measurement from Storey's/Belanger?? I'm going to check. Well, I just heard from the breeder about what he fed so I'm going to try and find that to supplement.

    We have them in a temporary pen right now and they've eaten all the browse there, not much grass due to our weather and we are feeding them some sweet gum, etc. when we can be out there. I really feel like my problem doe is not getting enough roughage in comparison to her grain.

    Thanks for your advice, I hope for more. We have less than a month of practical experience so we need all the help we can get.
     
  6. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

    9,442
    1
    0
    Meredith are these does all dry?? or are you milking? if dry they don't need any grain unless they are growing doelings
     
  7. Merry Beth

    Merry Beth New Member

    114
    0
    0
    I haven't had much time to post due to a death. But I was hoping for more input.

    Thanks so much for your help Sondra. Two of the does are in milk, and I reweighed the grain they are getting and looked up the instructions I had received in the book. We are feeding about 2.5-3 pounds per day/grain ration. The goat that produced a bit more milk gets a bit more grain too, she's greedy.

    My book says to feed one pound concentrate for maintenance per doe (I think dry or not?) and 1 lb. for every two lbs. milk produced.

    We have added a browse walk daily for each doe since we have no browse in the temp. pen any more.

    I hope to find some alfalfa pellets they will eat this week. All that we have available is Prime Quality and whatever the brand is I bought already--they turn their noses up at it.

    My county agent told me yesterday that when I start fooling around with their feed and adding alfalfa pellets and dairy goat pellets (anybody on here use those?) I'm going to mess up their "complete meal". I'm thinking I'm just adding to since I won't be dropping their rations at all. Opinions?

    I tell ya, I think I can speak for the newbies and say that it's confusing for us when we hear and/or read so many conflicting goat rearing techniques and opinions. :? And from so many experts. Our does' breeder, whom you would know if I dropped his name, tells me not to worry everybody raises goats differently. :sigh
     
  8. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

    9,442
    1
    0
    OK I don't know how much your goats are producing lb wise nor what breed of goat you have but will say this. I have had ND , and full blood LaManchas for 10 yrs now. and my FB LaMancha produces aprox 1 1/2 gal (12lb) milk per day and she gets all the alfalfa pellets she wants plus burmuda grass hay but only get 1lb of grain per milking = 2lb per day. my ND that I have now produces aprox. 16oz per day and gets 1/2 lb of grain only on the milk stand for the grain. All the Nubian's get aprox 1lb of grain per milking and produce any where from 3/4 gal to 1 gal of milk per day. The alfalfa is what is going to put milk in your bucket not the grain. plus if you over load on grain you are not going to have a balanced cal/phos ratio I don't care what your extention agent says.
     
  9. mill-valley

    mill-valley New Member

    1,045
    0
    0
    Exactly, don't listen to the agent. Sounds like uneducated drivel to me. Changing to an alfalfa pellet base instead of grain base ration was the best thing I've done so far. Use to feed a ton of grain (like 5-6 lb/day/head) and now is way cut back. I still feed more than Sondra but they get their alfalfa pellets as main meal.
     
  10. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

    9,442
    1
    0
    DuH the LaMancha get 1 1/2 lb of grain per milking or 3lbs per day
     
  11. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

    1,275
    2
    0
    An alfalfa pellet that they will eat would be a wise choice and especially since you have no grass or browse. Alfalfa pellets will put milk in the pail like Sondra said. When I first tried alfalfa pellets (instead of alfalfa hay), the first type were small about the size of rabbit pellets. My goats wouldn't touch them. Then I found the larger type and they ate them with gusto. In Louisiana, Arrow Feeds (O'Neils from DeRidder) makes a nice pellet. They have less dust and the goats will usually eat them. Put the pellets where the goats can eat them together - competition helps more than anything to get a goat to eat. Put out only what they will clean up. Stale food won't work with goats.
     
  12. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    4
    0
    I also feed Arrow brand alfalfa pellets, Evans when I can't get Arrow.

    Merry, it is alot of information to process. Why you have to set your management based on someone who has stock that you admire and also has goats in your surrounding area. Not alot of reason to try to reproduce what someone in Maine does when you can't get half the products and you live in worm haven Lousianna with Tim Pruitt...hint hint :)

    I would be following his management style, what he feeds, how he worms etc..and if you have nubians, how he breeds. Vicki
     
  13. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

    1,837
    0
    0
    For one...your book is telling you the ratio that is standard (not necessarily followed) for DAIRY CATTLE! That ARE LACTATING. This ratio was preached to us for years by Iowa & Penn State University. I knew it sounded familar.

    My suggestion....close that book and get on the phone to Tim Pruitt. He's in your area, has outstanding animals, and production to go with it, AND years more experience in goats (in hot humid, La.) than your county agent.
    Kaye
     
  14. Merry Beth

    Merry Beth New Member

    114
    0
    0
    We actually bought our goats from Tim Pruitt, and you are making me feel really good about that ;). I have emailed him and he has been very good to help me, I just hate to bug him all the time. :) (Of course, I'm still bugging him since he knows who I am on here and he's responded twice today.)

    I am trying really hard to find the food I need. Mr. Pruitt makes his own concentrate if I'm not mistaken--I'm way not that smart I think. I had no idea that finding food for goats was so complicated. Maybe I'm making it complicated?

    The goats DO seem to eat the alfalfa better when they are trying to compete for it. I bought some new today and it looks the same as the other, smells different tho. Can't find the brand recommended anywhere nearby.

    Also, my little feed store lady fell down on the job and now I am out of concentrate entirely and don't know exactly what to do--switch to sweet stuff/all grain or what??? The clumpy poo was just beginning to improve...I don't think I had this much anxiety as a new mom!!
     
  15. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

    1,837
    0
    0
    :rofl
    He's been in goats long enough to know that comes with the territory! :lol
    He wants nothing more than for your goats to do good! For the time being...with the stock you have...don't DO ANYTHING without checking with him first! Don't try to wing it on your own, don't read stuff in a book and try it, don't listen to other people~ CHECK WITH TIM FIRST!
    Kaye
     
  16. Merry Beth

    Merry Beth New Member

    114
    0
    0
    Okeedokee...

    I've been trying to do that and will continue to do so. He recommended this site to me and told me who to listen to ;).
     
  17. Karen Bailey

    Karen Bailey New Member

    141
    0
    0
    Meridith,
    I think part of being a reputable breeder is to answer questions and help people that are new to goats, especially when you sell goats to someone just starting out. Think of Tim Pruitt and this forum as your safety net to keep you from having to learn all the important stuff the hard way with sick goats. That way, you get to enjoy having your goats without the heartache of loosing some of them as you learn. :D
     
  18. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

    9,442
    1
    0
    If you can't get your normal grain now Please don't go with any sweet feed. go with whole oats or just alfalfa pellets or a dry grain mix until you can get what you have been. Or run back up to Tim's and bum some grain. Mixing your own is not hard so get Tim's recipe. But now that you are out of thier normal grain then introduce anything new very gradually or you will have a problem.
     
  19. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

    1,275
    2
    0
    Meredith,
    The reason that goat keeping and management is so diverse is because it is regional. Goats in the dry deserts of California and Arizona are managed differently from the humid south. Here we have to worm more frequently, treat for coccidia more agressively and feed different feeds than what they do in the North or West. Some of this depends on feed availability. For example, if I could get some of that fine alfalfa grown in the NW - I probably wouldn't feed alfalfa pellets. However, the local alfalfa grown on the Red River bottom is so stemmy, and gets moldy so quickly that it doesn't make good sense to buy it when you pitch half of the bale out as bedding. Too because farming is well on its way out in N. Louisiana - it makes it even more difficult to purchase good quality feeds. Feed dealers are stocking up extra because of high shipping cost and that results in passing on stale food to you.

    I recommended this forum to you because Vicki, Kaye and Sondra (in particular) raises dairy goats in the same region as I do. Someone is available almost 24/7 (or late at night) where I am not - (early morning is best for me). I am grateful to these ladies who so unselfishly give their time to help others with their goat problems. Be sure though that I am here to help you when needed. I do travel some but I usually take my computer with me and can be reached by email.

    I will be emailing you privately to further discuss your goat's needs.
     
  20. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

    1,837
    0
    0
    :rofl See, Tim is a very good person! He'll help in any way he can. We all use basically the same management IN THIS AREA...but it can be quite different in other parts-like he said.

    I, still, to this day wish I had had internet when I first started doing goats-or even a competent vet with goats(they were treated like small cows???)...so most of our (Vicki, Tim, Me) have learned through hard knocks, trial and error most of the stuff we pass on. I didn't even have a mentor. :(
    Kaye