Chickens in with the goats

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by cloverhillgoats, Jun 1, 2008.

  1. cloverhillgoats

    cloverhillgoats New Member

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    I read somewhere that worms were worse and hard to control in goats when you put chickens in with them. They don't digest the worms totally and spread them everywhere. Is that true? Has anyone tried this?
     
  2. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    my chickens run free range the only problem I have with them is once in a while getting the water dirty. But they also don't have access to feeding areas or hay to poop on.
     

  3. pokyone42

    pokyone42 New Member

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    We used to run chickens with the goats.. The only real problems we had were them pooping on gate-latches, etc. when they would roost at night. Once in a while, they would lay eggs in hay racks. we ended up moving them to a different part of the property, and a different barn, and the goat barn stays much cleaner.
     
  4. Feral Nature

    Feral Nature Active Member

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    My chickens irritate me because they eat the goat feed in the pens actually crowding out the goats sometimes, if you can believe that. I have 7 roosters caught right now that will meet their maker in the morning.
     
  5. Nancy

    Nancy New Member

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    we leave our chickens loose. About the only time they go into the goat barn is to lay their eggs. I guess they figure the goats would protect them.
     
  6. Jennie

    Jennie New Member

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    I only have two that run loose right now. A mean chicken that beats all the other chickens up and a pet. They like to go and scratch through the chicken pens. Some of my goats don't like them though and chase them and will pull feathers if they can get close enough. I did have one get in on the hay the other day and one thing I won't put up with is chicken poop in the goats hay. Yuck! I did find an egg in the goats feeder ther other day. Since it was green it blended in pretty well. It ended up getting tossed since I didn't know how long it had been in there.
     
  7. lyceum

    lyceum Guest

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    Well, I was planning on letting my chickens free range when I moved, but that won't be happening until the fox that killed the neighbors hens has been caught. I will just have to construct a pen for them. The farm that I am buying conects with our property (my parents are staying at our current location). He is leaving me a dozen or so chickens that he doesn't want to haul with him. I hope the fox gets caught, shot, whatever before I take my chickens down.

    Carisa
     
  8. doulanobles

    doulanobles Guest

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    My chickens free range around the goats all the time. They have their own place to sleep away from them, though. They scratch through the bedding and that is a benefit. Sometimes they lay in the goat stall and when my alpine mix was in labor, I saw her eating an egg I had missed. :biggrin I guess she needed the extra protein! Niw I leave the chickens locked up for part of the morning so they lay in their nest boxes. I actually heard that they help decrease the worm load of ruminants...
     
  9. Terry

    Terry Member

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    I let my chickens out with my goats once a week to clean up around the feeders.
     
  10. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    I've heard the worm stories both ways, and IMO, it doesn't make much difference on the worms. ....and like Terry, I do like the way mine clean up soiled grain around the feeders and places. I believe that the goats would benefit some, by all the ticks and other small pest that the chickens will eat. (even small snakes)

    I have varmints that eat my chickens, so mine are all locked back up at night in the hen house.....only to be let out about every other day.

    The biggest down side to having chickens running around everywhere, is that I seem to get more poop stuck on my shoes.....and that is never a good thing. :nooo

    Whim
     
  11. Sharpgoat

    Sharpgoat New Member

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    I think that fly control would be the big thing with the chickens scratching through the bedding and eating the maggots. :ick
    My chickens are free range but they know not to go in with the goats or they well be eaten by the LSG dogs.
    I am glad they don't it is no fun to pick up a baby goat and get chicken mess on you and as far as udders laying around in chicken mess sound like trouble to me :nooo
    Fran
     
  12. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    My chicken also pounce on the poos and get any undigested grain. So they are efficient like that. They also occasionally hitch a goat ride lol.
     
  13. SamSpade

    SamSpade New Member

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    I keep chickens with my goats. I am still studying the question of how they affect the parasites. But the reading I have done says the problem is that chickens might track parasites into the feed hay if they have access to the feeders. I have not found any scientificish references to parasites chickens and goats have in common that chickens would excerbate.

    In my situation, I monthly move the goats to a new shelter and pasture to break the life cycle of parasites. Chickens follow the goats, scratching up the bedding in the newly vacated goat shelter. They also pick apart poops on the pasture. I don't make a point of keeping the chickens out of the current goat shelter, but with the choice of three other empty goat shelters, the chickens generally choose to stick to the empty shelters.

    It is my understanding from conversations with other livestock holders that chickens will eat and digest larval parasites on pasture. Maybe the undigested ones the original poster was refering to would be the eggs or other encsyted stages like flees can go through.

    Just adding my voice to the chorus.
     
  14. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    Just keep in mind that most chickens eat what they can see and swallow.........My chickens can spot a hawk flying around at a far distance, but in no way do they have 40X vision........so IMO, a chicken will do very little good eating up the eggs, etc. unless they happen to be setting on a grain of corn, or something other that they can see and is good to eat.
    ....and like most birds, an insect almost has to wiggle just a bit to really be tasty.

    Whim
     
  15. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    :lol I'll add my 2cents on this subject...just for the heck of it!
    My 10 hens (yeah, I broke down and bought 10 layers) are free range and they don't roost in the goat barn. But, I can see the benefits of them scratching around in the muck under the hay feeders. But, then again, my hay feeders are outside. They expose the fly larve and eat as many of them as they can consume. It also dries out the hay on the ground between clean ups.??? Not one bit of scientific evidence here...but, I'm happy, the hens are happy, and I get REALLY good eggs. :biggrin
    Kaye

    P.S. I've decided that I'm in the wrong business at the cost of laying hens lately!! :eek
     
  16. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    Every banty that's been going broody, I've been shoving tons of good laying hen eggs under em lol.
     
  17. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    LOL...I never thought of that!!! Heck, some of my banties would sit on a door knob if left in the nest! Hhmmmm...they sold fertilized eggs at that auction. :lightbubl :lightbubl
    Kaye
     
  18. Cotton Eyed Does

    Cotton Eyed Does New Member

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    I had been trying for years to to get DH to let me get rid of our chickens. Finally did it, all but a couple of them and the chicken pen is where I have the bulk of my garden this year. DH has decided that we need chickens again. He has always had chickens so now we are starting all over with that again. Wouldn't be so bad if HE was the one that tended to them. Oh well. Anyway he's ordered a whole variety of chickens Silver Laced Wyandottes, Black Australorps, Black Star, Anconas and White Rocks. I think they all lay brown eggs except for the Anconas and I never heard of that breed before. SO... we have 30 chicks suppose to be in this month that I get to take care of. I can tell you one thing. I am going to build a snake proof coop. I'm not getting attached to these things and then have a chicken snake come smother them or eat them. It is going to look like we had a bad hail storm when I get finished putting out all those golf balls.
     
  19. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    :rofl :rofl :rofl
    oh yea......you gonna be getting some green/blue eggs too I think.

    Whim
     
  20. Jo~*

    Jo~* New Member

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    Black Australorps and White Rocks have been about the best layers we have ever had. My daughter is in 4H poultry for 4 years now and the two above mentioned breeds have been the best so far. The White Rocks even layed a fair amount during the winter. One of the BA went broody for a really long time so after weeks of tyring to discourage her she went into the pot. Hubby does the cooking and I do the dirty work. I guess I should have told him not to fry that hen cause she was the skinniest and toughest bird we ever had.
    The funny part was I didn't tell my daughter we were eating that chicken for dinner--not because she would have cared I just wanted to see if she said anything about its taste or whatever, well during dinner the daughter says--ya know we should have eaten that broody hen. It was one of them things that you have to kind of be there but it was :rofl at the time. Daughter is 15 and helps me kill chickens and rabbits all the time. Now her friends on the other hand think its just discution to do such things. I tell her to tell her friends if they think its ok for animals to be raised in some of he inhumane ways that some of them are before slaughter at commercial places and ask them to think about that, since the end result is the same.
    Right now we have 17 hens that are laying and I sell the eggs for $3.00 a dozen and then turn around and use that money for chicken feed for them and the other 13 pullets not laying yet and the 26 jumbo Cornish and 2 turkeys. So far I have not had to use any out of pocket cash for feed but the bigger the Cornish get the closer it gets to having to shell out my cash for feed. Last week the price was $13.80 for 50# who knows what it will be this week :/ After fair the numbers go way down of what we keep. All but three of the Cornish go in our freezer, the other three go to jr livestock auction at fair. Last year daughter cleared $400.00 for three Cornish but I told her not to be to disappointed if things don't go as well this year because of the economy. The old layers (only 1 1/2 years will be sold and the new pullets will be kept. Boy I just don't know about the 2 turkeys,I think they have gotton to friendly to be Thanksgiving??