Can't believe I'm going to ask this question...

Discussion in 'Cheese & Dairy' started by clishmaclaver, Jun 6, 2013.

  1. clishmaclaver

    clishmaclaver New Member

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    But...

    Several clients are now buying milk from me to make cheese, which would be a good thing if it weren't for the fact that they want a "goatier" flavor.
    So----how does one advise them to handle their milk in such a way as to produce said goatiness???:confused:

    This is a tad bit ironical to me, as I've always strived to never have a goaty flavor in my milk/products.

    Thanks ( I think LOL)
    ronni
     
  2. nightskyfarm

    nightskyfarm New Member

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    Tell them to buy some canned Meyenburg milk and add it during the cheese making process :) Actually, it does work to enhance that 'goatiness'.
     

  3. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Tell them to age the milk in the fridge a few days or a week or more.
     
  4. clishmaclaver

    clishmaclaver New Member

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    Thanks guys!

    Never thought of the Meyenburg, but it sure makes sense.
    Had thought about having them age the milk, so thanks for that suggestion.

    Will pass the choices on...and try not to impart a sense of...yuck. :biggrin
     
  5. fmg

    fmg New Member

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    I have heard that lipase powder can help make it goaty too.
     
  6. GatesFamilyFarm

    GatesFamilyFarm New Member

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    Still trying to figure the term 'goaty'. Funny.... Is old, off tasting cow's milk 'cowwy'?!
     
  7. SolsticeSun

    SolsticeSun Member

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    I would also suggest lipase. I wish them luck, I work pretty hard to make sure my cheeses and milk don't come out "goaty" so I'm fascinated that anyone would want that....to each their own
     
  8. milkmaidranch

    milkmaidranch New Member

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    Tell them to not use it "fresh". If it sits in the fridge for about a week, believe me, it will have a goatie flavor to it.

    Suzy
     
  9. janner

    janner New Member

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    I have a friend that is from France where the goatyer the better. He lets his milk set out on the counter for hours before he does anything to it. Let me tell you IT WORKS:eek:
     
  10. rosawoodsii

    rosawoodsii New Member

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    Yup, if it's raw milk it is. :)
     
  11. feistymomma

    feistymomma New Member

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    Not sure why anyone would want a more "goaty" flavor. It honestly tastes like licking my buck when I eat some of those cheeses .......mmmmmmmmmmm :)
     
  12. hsmomof4

    hsmomof4 New Member

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    That is how a friend of mine described the milk from his goats, "Like you drank a glass of milk and then licked a goat." Yuck. (And no, he wasn't happy with that, and in spite of good milk handling, his goats just had goaty milk.)
     
  13. rosawoodsii

    rosawoodsii New Member

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    Sounds like he needs to up the B-vitamins for his goats. Either yeast, 1 Tbsp a day for a week, then 1 tsp a day after that, or cobalt so they can make their own.

    I had two goats with goaty milk. The yeast fixed the taste within 2-3 weeks. Longterm, cobalt is better, because yeast can make some of them a bit skittish.
     
  14. hsmomof4

    hsmomof4 New Member

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    Maybe. Some lines of goats have stronger tasting milk than others do, too. Joy, can you update your signature line to include the breed of goats, please?
     
  15. SolsticeSun

    SolsticeSun Member

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    Yeast = skittish? How does that work?

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I727 using Dairy Goat Forum mobile app
     
  16. rosawoodsii

    rosawoodsii New Member

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    Beats me, but when Irene Ramsay, a breeder from New Zealand (40 years with Saanens) mentioned it, I took one of my skittish does off yeast and within a week she became calmer. I'm going to go back to using cobalt in the water. Takes more thought and time, but then they make their own B vitamins without the side effect.
     
  17. jebradl

    jebradl New Member

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    Maybe they're drunk.

    Since the goat's grazings hang around in their rumen for a while, some of the sugars may be getting converted to alcohol.

     
  18. racyford

    racyford New Member

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    I know this is a pretty old post, but it made me laugh.

    My husband and I went to a company Christmas party at a downtown Houston hotel one year. I was super excited because on the buffet tables there was a Romaine salad with cranberries, walnuts and GOAT CHEESE. I put my salad on the plate and gracefully rushed back to the table to eat it. I put a bite in my mouth and had to gracefully not gag/spit it out on the table. I whispered to my husband "don't eat the cheese... tastes like a buck in rut smells." So HE says aloud to his buddy sitting at the table with us "HEY MAN, DONT EAT THE CHEESE. ITS NASTY; LIKE A BUCK IN RUT." Then he has to explain what a buck in rut is. {yay for dinner conversation! Several of our table mates decided to go find a better class of dinner companions for the evening, lol.}~~~~~~~ THEN the buddy's wife sits down, starts going on about the EXQUISITE goat cheese in the salad and her husband says "Yeah? Well, his wife says it tastes like a buck in rut. She makes goat cheese, so she knows what she's talking about..."

    MORAL OF THE STORY: my husband isn't allowed to tell anyone, anymore, that I make goat cheese. ESPECIALLY not at a dinner party. Or at dinner. EVER. LOL
     
  19. hsmomof4

    hsmomof4 New Member

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    I hear you. I once ordered a carmelized onion and goat cheese pizza...and could NOT eat it. Waaaay too goaty. Blech.
     
  20. WildflowerFarm

    WildflowerFarm New Member

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    If the question is still up, I have heard that toggenberg milk has a stronger flavor, no personal expierience though.