Calf Pro Coccidiostat Containing Bovatech

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Anita Martin, Mar 19, 2011.

  1. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    I recently was talking with a local breeder about what she used for coccidia control and she told me she uses the product called Calf Pro. She showed me the bottle. It is in liquid form. She says it's easier on their kidneys and such. I think she said she gives it every day in their milk. Her kids look absolutely fantastic. I'm wondering if anyone else uses this and what their results were and if the taste is as bad as corid? Also, would the dosage be the same dosage as the label states for calves?


    http://www.mws-d.com/ProductDetail.aspx?productid=270012
     
  2. MF-Alpines

    MF-Alpines New Member

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    I found this info:

    Deccox and Bovatec are both manufactured by the same company, Alpharma. Deccox (decoquinate) is a coccidiostat that stops the growth of coccidia, but does not kill coccidia. It works by inhibiting the activity of the cell's mitochondria, interfering with energy production within the cell. Deccox acts at 5 developmental stages of coccidia, and provides the widest range of action of all the anticoccidial agents

    Bovatec (lasalocid) is a coccidiocide that kills coccidia. It is an ionophore that moves potassium, sodium, calcium and magnesium into the cell causing the cell to burst. Bovatec works primarily on a single developmental stage of coccidia, providing a more narrow range of action than Deccox.

    Research studies evaluating the performance of both anticoccidial agents under the same conditions report similar levels of coccidia control.

    For best results, the anticoccidial agent selected for use in milk replacer should also be the same anticoccidial agent used in the calf starter feed. Since a calf typically consumes a fixed amount of milk replacer each day (1 gallon), it therefore consumes a fixed amount of anticoccidial agent each day. The amount of anticoccidial agent the calf needs is based on its body size. As the calf grows it consumes more and more starter feed. If the only source of an anticoccidial agent is the milk replacer, the amount of the drug consumed may soon be inadequate for proper coccidia control. If, for example, the milk replacer contains Bovatec and the starter contains Deccox, there will be a critical period of time during the calf's development where it does not consume enough of either drug to provide coccidia control.

    A similar situation can occur with Rumensin, a medication commonly added to growing heifer diets. Like Bovatec, Rumensin (monensin) is an ionophore and is an effective anticoccidial agent. However, Rumensin is not approved for inclusion in milk replacers. Medicating the calf started feed with Rumensin and the milk replacer with either Deccox or Bovatec, may lead to a period of inadequate dosing and control of coccidia. If coccidia control in pre-weaned calves is the objective, providing a single, approved medication in both the milk replacer and the calf starter feed is the best course of action.

    Link: www.merricks.com/tech_deccox.htm
     

  3. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Does she fecal to know it is working? Can you ask her what kind of numbers she was having before and what numbers she is having now? And no it wouldn't be the calf dosage. Lasalocid/bovatec is what I used to have in my custom kid feed, now we use Rumensin.
     
  4. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    I will ask next time I visit. Corid seems to get a bad wrap for causing thiamine deficiencies, liver or kidney stress, etc. but it's worked well for us and as far as I know I've not seen any thiamine deficiencies.
     
  5. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Grrrr.... Corid blocks the occyst ability to uptake thiamin...NOT THE GOAT!!!! Stuff like that drives me crazy :) LOL!
     
  6. Laverne

    Laverne New Member

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    So the coccidiostat in the feed, fed daily, replaces the 20 day prevention routine?
     
  7. nightskyfarm

    nightskyfarm New Member

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    Anita, Rumensin is highly toxic to equines so it you use it, keep it well away from horse feed. Rumensin works really well and I have fed a feed with it and th e kids did well. I stopped using it because I was afraid one of my children may mistake the grain and give some to an equine, so I do not use it any longer. If Rumensin is toxic, you may want to look into the toxicity or not of the other medications.
     
  8. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Lavern it only can replace it when the kids are consuming the 1 pound of it for every 30 to 50 pounds of body weight they weigh...and by then on my farm the kid would be dead from cocci :) V
     
  9. grandmajo

    grandmajo New Member

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    Ok, I don't understand the idea behind feeding a medicated feed and still doing the cocci prevention every 21 days?

    I do things a little differently here. I don't feed a medicated feed. I do use CoRid for 3 cycles of cocci prevention. Then no more, unless a fecal shows that it's needed. And that has been working for me, but keep in mind that I'm not in paradise-heaven down south either.

    So what is the gain in feeding a medicated feed?
     
  10. Ashley

    Ashley Active Member

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    The reasoning is you feed the cocci prevention every 21 days UNTIL the kids are eating enough medicated feed to get the dose of meds in it needed to keep the cocci at bay. Until then it's not going to keep the kids safe from Cocci.
     
  11. lorit

    lorit Senior Member

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    So at what age are kids typically no longer so sensitive to cocci? If you use preventative and medicated feed, when do you stop?
     
  12. DoriOakes

    DoriOakes New Member

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    This is false information. Tell that to the buckling that we lost last year. On day 3 of Corid he developed polio and even thiamin shoults could not save him. It affects the goat as well.