CAE/CL Testing

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by new2goats, Sep 4, 2008.

  1. new2goats

    new2goats Guest

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    I've been trying to figure this out..looked through Dairy Goat 101 and still didn't really find what I was looking for so please forgive me if this has been answered already.

    My mom has the dump off Nigerian crosses and we have no clue where they came from or what they could have been exposed to before we got them. Though I am happy to say they are looking much better now that they have quality food and have been wormed! :biggrin

    Now...I am planning to get my own Dairy Goats in the next few months and my mom would also like to buy some quality animals from a responsible breeder. But due to the unknowns with the current goats we don't want to expose any healthy animals to them. So any new goats we get will live here at my place.

    Can someone please tell me where (website link, phone number ect. ect.) to order the supplies and give a basic run down on testing for CAE and CL on your own?? What is an estimated cost per goat on this testing???

    I know many people test on their own, but I have no clue where to get the equipment I need (tubes and such for the blood) nor do I know where to send it and what is required. But we REALLY want to know if these goats of my moms have anything or not. Also..she's only had them for a short time, so would it be best to test them, make sure they do not come into contact with other animals and then test again in a few months to be sure all is clear before introducing more goats to her property?

    Next thing we've been wondering about....IF they do have CAE or CL, what do we do then?? CL I understand is the worst of the two, but what if they do have CAE? Do we have to have them PTS or can they still be used for home dairy/meat?


    I would greatly appreciate any help that could be offered on this, and please bear with me as I am still new to all this and don't have all the "lingo" down pat, but I will do my very best to keep up ;)
     
  2. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Are you going to put them down if they do test positive?

    If the answer is no than I would not even bother with them. I would care for them, know that if you get an abscess you need to test the abscess itself or the material inside and let them have a nice life on your moms farm.

    Now...when you buy your own goats...you are going to buy from someone who can show you CAE negative test, someone who has stock that you admire an that you have ran passed someone on this forum to get a go for it.

    You then can go to biotracking.com they will send you the stuff to bloodtest....both for checking for pregnancy but also for CAE. All the info is up on their forum and also their phone number, they are super nice. They want our business.

    If you are going to introduce more goats to her property let it be with kids out of these does.

    Now if you are going to test and cull. Than pull blood on all the goats, send the blood into UC Davis for CL testing and to biotracking for CAE...or look up the WSU into in goatkeeping 101 and you can send both to them. Just know that negative for CL does not mean they are, it only means they don't have an active case. CL is not in the blood unless an abcess is forming. Vicki
     

  3. new2goats

    new2goats Guest

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    They are my mom's goats so it's not my decision whether or not to put them down...she is quiet taken with two of the little does though and they are becoming tame and spoiled so I highly doubt she could do it unless it was absolutly nessesary.

    These goats are pygmy crosses and she is curious as to what sort of milk production she will get and if it's not decent she'd like to "upgrade" Thing is she never intended to get any goats from anywhere other than someone reputable with healthy, disease free stock. These were dump offs though and very last minute so it's not like they were really planned ;)

    In the future she wants quality, registered goats, full blood dairy goats but was leary of getting anything else due to the possibility of her current goats have CL or CAE. Hence the reason she wants to test. She lives on 20 acres.....could she build a separate barn and pens for any goats she gets in the future and keep them from getting anything her current goats may have? I just don't see her having these babies PTS, so maybe that could be an option I throw at her as long as they are very far apart from each other.. :/

    For me, and my property..I will not be getting any goats from anywhere but a breeder who has healthy stock and can prove it..Met several nice people here with great goats so I don't think finding what I want when the time is right will be hard at all ;) This board has been a life saver for me because it's kept me from jumping into anything too soon and the wealth of info here is awesome! There is so much that goes into this that I didn't even know about so I really do appreciate all the information and help.
     
  4. hamilton40

    hamilton40 New Member

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    I am sure it will depend on what they are crossed with but a Pygmy wont give enough milk to be worth your time to milk it. Sorry
    Clay
     
  5. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    That's not entirely true. Kinders (Nubians X Pygmy crosses) can milk quite well. Perhaps Jo can chime in on this. Also, Trisha used to raise Kinders as well. From what I remember they were pretty good little milkers for their size.

    I have some friends who milk Pygmy's and get a good amount of milk from them. It will depend on the individual goats of course.

    Sara
     
  6. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I would tell her to do the opposite, build a small barn and area for these goats, then as she tests and finds out for herself as the girls get abscess or don't, then they haven't contaminated her property. The rub on the abscess which when ripe obviously hurts, all over the trees and fence posts, the exude and abscess itself goes into the soil, barn walls, feeders and really makes your property contagious. Vicki
     
  7. hamilton40

    hamilton40 New Member

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    Maybe it has to do with the part of the country or herds they are from. I have had several over the years and have known several other people that have had pure bred Pygmy goats and none of the ones out here that I have had anything to do with have given more than 3 or 4 cups a day at most and usually a fair amount less then that. But I have not seen them all and I am sure that other people have seen Pygmy goats give a lot more. This is just my opinion and experience with them.
    Clay
     
  8. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Yes Clay and one look at the teats on those little softbal udders, I wouldn't want to be the one climbing down there to have to squeeze them little suckers either :) You would be milking with two fingers.

    Turning them into milkers would be an expensive futile job, I would keep them as pets, perhaps even wether the males so the group doesn't get larger. Pygmy's are free goats around me, especially the males. vicki
     
  9. mamatomany

    mamatomany New Member

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    I just had my goats tested for CAE and Titer CL a whopping $45 per goat...well worth the money - just the peace of mind.
     
  10. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    I'm not saying that I would milk them, just that you can. :)

    Sara
     
  11. new2goats

    new2goats Guest

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    The does she has are 3/4 Nigerian Dwarf and 1/4 pygmy. The lil boy she has is full blood pygmy. So I have no clue what the milking possibilities would be with the does. They are obviously much different looking from the boy though. He is kind of squatty, short necked and very square and the girls are much taller than him, long bodied and have pretty long necks.

    Right now these goats do not & have not had run of her property. She has a small pen for them with a shelter (we separated the boy from them though they share a fence line..hopefully no one got bred) and they are located at the front corner of her property....back behind her house she has her horse barn and their pen....she was hoping that if she made a new barn and pen somewhere back off by the horse pen (where these current goats have never even stepped foot near) which is a good distance from the current goat pen that she would be able to buy her dairy goats that she wants and keep them away from the others who may or may not have something. (Hope that made sense)

    The delima is she wouldn't want to sell these goats to someone knowing they have (or possibly have) a health issue...if they can live a decent life even with a possible condition then she doesn't want to have them PTS so she was hoping for a middle ground somewhere so she could have quality milkers but keep them away from anything the other goats have ever been around...
     
  12. hamilton40

    hamilton40 New Member

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    She could put a add on craigslist and probably find good pet homes for these goats and then buy good healthy dairy goats and all of her problems would be taken care of. Just let the people that take them know the situation.
    Clay
     
  13. Jo@LaudoDeumFarm

    [email protected] New Member

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    Some Kinder's are really good milkers for their size. Most are comparable to mini-Nubians. And some Pygmy's can milk as well as Nigerian Dwarfs. It depends on the lines they come from. If you look at maggidans.com she has pictures of her pygmy's that she milks. You can see the udders too. Some have nice milkable teats and some are little itty bitty things.

    If I had a pygmy I'd milk it. Or at least try to. ;) It's important to remember that not every one needs or wants a whole gallon or even half gallon a day and that is one of the draws for the Nigerian Dwarf and other mini breeds. They make manageable amounts of milk for a single person who only wants to use what they produce, or have on hand.

    Of course, I would not milk an animal that wasn't negative for cl or cae, had mastitis, fed medicated feeds or was just given wormers. I would just make sure the animals was healthy, the teat size was adequate and give it a go. You might like it or you might hate it, but you won't know until you try.

    If the animals are healthy this might be a great way of starting out and learning how to milk and make cheese an other stuff on a small time basis.
     
  14. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Oh many of the ND are wonderful milkers and pygmys are basically good little milkers just tiny two fingered teats but very high butterfat so all depends on the teats on these goats. I have a ND with tiny teats but a very easy milker and I use the same inflations on my maching if I use it.

    Chrystal how far are you from Fort Worth?? maybe I could come out one week end and draw blood for you /trim hooves etc.