CAE and breeding ?'s

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by 4fromgoatilia, Sep 11, 2008.

  1. I was told today that even though I have my buck in a pen that separate from our does that although he has been raised CAE prevention he can still get CAE from our does. ??? They don't share the same pen, they eat out of different hay containers not even close to each other, their waters are far away from each other, and Demi John was also raised CAE prevention. Why would I need to CAE test Theodon this year? Senior doe will be tested before he even gets her. Doelings were all raised CAE prevention so I won't test them til next year. Am I correct in this? Tammy


    And I for got to mention that not only does this person want a CAE done on him but also a CL, a Listerosis and a Brucellosis. Is this all really necessary a 6 months of age?
     
  2. crocee

    crocee New Member

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    I would test to be somewhat positive.
    Crocee
     

  3. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    If you are leasing him out for someone else to use on their does then yes she thinks it is necessary. If you are using him just for yourself and your does then it is completly up to you when you do your testing.
     
  4. Well then...I guess I placed an ad for nothing. Because I'm not gonna test him until next year. And after I have Ava tested I was told that when neg results come back I am considered CAE free herd. I am not rich enough this year to get all those tests done. Just CAE for senior doe, so will have to just hog him all to ourselves. Tammy
     
  5. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    The passing of CAE from dam to buck or vice versa during breeding isn't even a consideration. It's one of those things we know they can pass in a lab setting but it simply doesn't happen on the farm. Technically correct that never happens in real life.

    How could so many herds have moved from CAE positive to negative all those years ago, like mine...if CAE was that easy to catch?

    It's not. And the idea listerosis??? TB or brucelosis to breed? Does she have the same thing on all her stock?

    There is just soo much miss-information around, it starts being really hard to explain to new people how to be careful without being crazy also. Vicki
     
  6. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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    You could offer to let her pay for the tests..... She may not be so enthusiastic then. :)

    If she was answering an ad, and you don't know her, how do you know she would come for breeding(s) after all of those expensive tests? We test for CAE - and since no issues with the rest, we don't test. If someone wanted those tests, either they pay for them or find another buck. Funny enough, I sure would be going over their goats with a fine tooth comb when they came. And if I had tested my buck clean, then they had better have clean tests in hand as well. (Heck, I'd probably want to see their tests either way :) )

    Some breedings just aren't worth it! :crazy You'll soon get to know which ones those are..... Camille
     
  7. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Tammy I wouldn't test for one person with a 6mo old buck that is for sure.
     
  8. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

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    Then again, CAE tests are only $3.30 here. Cheap peace of mind for me. We didn't test our buck last year as he was too young, but this year, soon as I can find someone without a sense of smell to help me, I'll pull blood on him and send it in.
    Anita
     
  9. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Tammy Bio-track is just $4 for CAE but they don't do CL
     
  10. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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    CAE test on a goat 6-12 months (or younger) can be inconclusive. As in, no way to tell if it is accurate, at least that is what WSU says. Also, for Tammy, she knows the herd she purchased Theoden from and should be pretty confident of his health status.

    CAE test for peace of mind, $4 with Biotracking not too bad, but the rest of the tests... Fuhget about it!

    And blood test for CL is not accurate either, so that's a waste of money.
     
  11. I know but I prefer WSU to Bio-track, remember the discount! And they do CL and List. I can only afford the one animal so it might as well be Ava, the older doe (7yr). Tammy

    Because of this I think I am gonna grill people from now on. If I'm gonna be put on the hot plate I think they should share the heat.
     
  12. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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  13. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    Maybe I missed something here......but if this was my buck, he would remain in my pen, and would only be breeding my doe's (naturally). .....and it really doesn't matter to me who's tested for what.
    Stud fees and such just ain't worth the exposure to all the other junk that is out there, and of that junk.....CAE would be about the least of my concerns being transmitted through mating.

    JMO, Whim
     
  14. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    I read this from the WSU site recently, but my understanding is that that's the case if they're fed CAE prevention, since antibodies may be passed, but the virus would have been inactivated. If they were dam raised, they'd get antibodies and live virus, so would the test be accurate earlier on?

    Discount? I didn't see that! Is that on WSU's biotracking option? Please share the good news with me! :) We're looking at testing our herd in the near future, and I want to make sure first of all, that I'm not doing it too early, and second of all, that I get as many discounts as possible! :D
     
  15. Yes there is no discount for most folks, however Lindsey is loaning a goat for 4-H and that persons Aunt works there so we can get a discount. She comes and shows us how to pull blood the first tube and the girls and I get to pull the other tube. I give her money she pays for the tests :biggrin. Really nice set up.

    and Whim the whole purpose for Theodon is our herd, however there is a shortage of $$$ so the goats need to bring in $$$. His contributions will help pay for feed and pellets. Now if I get this job today he can just stand around and look like a buck all he wants. If I don't he has to work. Thats just the way it is. :/ Tammy
     
  16. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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    Also, folks who live in WA pay less than the rest of us schmucks. :)
     
  17. :yeahthat Its great to live only 45 minutes from Pullman and Moscow. Now I want to clear something up so everyone knows. WSU WADDL and Bio-Tracking are two separate entities. One is in Pullman, Washington (WSU) and the other is in Moscow, Idaho (Bio-Tracking/not sure but I think it is University of Idaho) . They are not affliated in any way. The cities are only 2-3 miles from each other ;). State line kinda thing.
     
  18. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    I wasn't thinking WSU and Bio-track are the same. Just that on WSU's list of things you can test goats for, there's a biotracking option that does CAE, CL, Johne's, Brucella... and I was wondering if there's a discount for going that route as opposed to checking off each test individually. I couldn't find anything on the fee schedule that would indicate that, but was wishfully thinking!
     
  19. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    It's only incunlusive as far as knowing if he will always stay negative or positive on his first test. Big difference between 6 months and 12 months...which is it? If you get a positive reading on a young kid it means he will either stay positive for life, or will go negative because he ONLY recieved colostrum or milk that was heat treated and pasteurised. Which then tells you the status of the herd you purchased from. I run blood tests on all kids I purchase for this exact reason.

    And by the time he is 12 months old and testable according to WSU...the breeder will then have blamed any positive test on her management. Having that blood test in the bank so to speak as the kid hits the property is some pretty cheap insurance.

    There is very few things a buck can catch from a doe breeding her, that can't be taken care of with some antibiotics, why I clean sheaths and penis on their last ejaculation into the doe. I can't imagine not having my breeding service money each fall.

    Set rules for your farm and stick to them, which can include not allowing others to make you jump through hoops :) Vicki