Buck question

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by stoneyheightsfarm, Dec 31, 2008.

  1. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    I have 2 bucks. Both dam raised. Both roughly 7 months old. When I brought them home, they were very stand-offish. I asked (not here) if I should let them remain stand-offish or try to make them friendly and cuddly. I was advised to make them cuddly. So, I spent hours in their pen and one got quite cuddly--would nibble at me until I pet or scratched his head and neck. The other kept his distance and still does, but will take a pet or scratch from time to time. He's harder to catch if I need him, but not obnoxious about attention when I'm in their barn and pen doing chores.

    The one who got all lovey dovey is now truely obnoxious. He wants to push me around and mount me. I've tried being firm with him, but apparently not firm enough b/c he just enjoys the attention and thinks I'm playing and gets a little rougher with me. While he's 7 months old, this is annoying, but in another year, it could be downright dangerous. I've also tried the friendly route, constant neck scratching, and I just can't get everything done that way. Then my other buck decides he might want some of the action and I have two obnoxious attention hogs.

    I had planned on having my 2nd barn built by now, and that one set up for the bucks so I don't really have to go in their pen much to tend to them, but we're not there yet.

    So, what is the best route to take with this guy? I've read about folks flipping bucks (on another board a few months back) and sitting on them for a while... I got him down (not really flipping) this morning and sat on him and he just seemed to enjoy that too much and it was like a license to up the rough housing. At 5 months pregnant and with a nasty case of bronchitis, I don't have the stamina for this!

    I think the only good thing about their need for attention is that they do very well with hoof trimmings. They like me leaning up against them! They don't listen at all like my girls, though, when I tell them to "get down" and that jumping on me is bad behavior!

    Suggestions? Help?
     
  2. wheytogosaanens

    wheytogosaanens New Member

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    Please don't wrestle your bucks! If your husband is willing to man-handle them, that would be fine.

    I think you might want to invest in a hot-shot. When you shock the buck, use a special word (a horrific NOOOOOO might be fine) or sound - my neighbor has a very effective noise sounds like AACCCCKKKKHHHSSSSHHH! Then when you make that noise, he will expect to be shocked and will back off. Two shocks should be enough to teach him, but take the prod with you in the pen anyway, just to be on the safe side. Only needed to use it twice on a randy 2 yr old buck - We could take a long stick in the pen after that and he would move to the far side.

    Oh, and get the long handled prod, not the pistol one. Camille
     

  3. SherrieC

    SherrieC Active Member

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    We generally tie our young buck up from outside, clip the collar to the fence and then you don't have the problems to deal with.
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    It's a futile fight to think you are going to teach a 7 month old buck in his first rut anything. In fact fighting with him, wrestling him to the ground is exactly what he wants you to do, to further prove he is dominant over you, or worse...one of his does.

    When a young buckling is like this, in fact up until they are yearlings and through their first season, any bad behavior is met with a clip to the fence. I walk in their pen, if they won't mind, which means leaving me alone, I snap a double end snap to their collar and immediatly snap them to the fence.

    After their first rut, I have never had a buck I have raised ever give me one moment of trouble. They learn quickly that you are the boss, without hitting, or squirting them with water or all of the myriads of things you will learn when asking this question.

    Most folks ruin their bucks with this kind of 'play', then when they are older they are a meanace.

    By doing these simple steps and not playing with your bucks (I am not talking about never petting them) but you simply can't let a young buck jump up, throw his leg on you, blubber at you, you will have a buck you can control when he is bigger and you are older :) Vicki
     
  5. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    Thanks so much. I'm glad I didn't hear, "Put him in the freezer and get a bottle baby," which is what I was afraid of! This, I can do! He will be especially offended if the other guy gets to have a go at the food first while he's clipped to the fence while I tend to the chickens in there. Typically, grain occupies him enough, but lately, he's been more interested in me. I can't tell you how many times I've said, "I'm NOT a doe!" This makes perfect sense.
     
  6. Haglerfarm

    Haglerfarm New Member

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    Absolutely Vicki.
    I tell people when they get young bucks from me to never ever play with them, never push on their heads, etc. All my bucks are very friendly and petted. I leave their heads alone and pet their necks and withers. I can do anything with them, even when in rutt.
    But, I had a buck what was bought as a kid and played roughly with when young. He was dangerous. Especially to men as that is who did this to him. He was actually playing, but when they get that big they are far too strong.
    Thankfully he was taught when young (by the breeder) to tie to a fence. All her bucks are taught this. It is very helpful. The buck was not rough when you first entered the pen, he would come for rubbing. Then he would get rougher, and rougher and then hit you.
    So whenever I went in I just put a collar on him and clipped him to the fence. Did what I needed to do, ten let him go. Worked well this way. I had his 2 full sisters, that is why I wanted him. They were excellent does. They personalities were not bad. He did not throw this. He was made this way. He was kept until he died. And I have him in the tank.
    Les
     
  7. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    Thanks, too, Les. :)

    The last few times I've been in the pen, I tried what would work with an out of control child as far as de-escalation--just being calm and gentle, not trying to be the big boss. The bucks have responded in kind--just calm and gentle. This last time, I spent quite a bit of time in there working on hanging chicken waterers from the rafters of the soon to be 2nd hayloft overhead and while they were curious, they wern't obnoxious. After I was all done, I spent time petting necks, and the one I mentioned before started to get rougher. I found that I could take his collar, walk him to the fence, and clip him just fine. He walks with me well. Seems that if I raise my voice to him, though, that he raises his activity level. Calm and quiet will be the way to approach him. I need to work on a gentle and quiet spirit anyhow! :) This works so much better than the other things I've seen, heard, and tried! Many thanks!
     
  8. homeacremom

    homeacremom New Member

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    Billie, I have to watch my bucks especially times when hormones are high in my body- menstruation, ovulation, and pregnancy. Don't know if it has anything to do with it, but they seem to smell that on me and blubber and act weird. Once I get large with a pregnancy and a little less agile I don't handle them alone.
     
  9. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    That's interesting. I had noticed before I got goats when I would visit a farm while ovulating or menstruating, that the bucks seemed especially attentive--moreso than other times. I thought that during pregnancy, I'd be boring to them! :) So, this could have something to do with it, too. Huh! :)