Blisters on Udder?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by KozaGirl, Mar 8, 2011.

  1. KozaGirl

    KozaGirl New Member

    108
    0
    0
    This picture was taken when my doe was 2 weeks freshened, with twins. Are these blisters normal? Most of them on the rear of her udder have "popped" but she still has a few on the underside and a couple up in front of her teats. We thought at first maybe it was just irritation from kidding, all the mucous, blood, hay, etc...
    But now that we are going on 4 weeks, I am starting to wonder..
    What say ye, experienced dairy goaters??
    :lol
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Rockinddtoggs

    Rockinddtoggs New Member

    126
    0
    0
    I'm not going to be much help but as curious what others say as a couple of my newly fresh does have them as well.
     

  3. hsmomof4

    hsmomof4 New Member

    3,402
    1
    0
    Could be a staph infection. What I've found helpful: spray the entire udder and teats pre-milking with chlorhexidine, diluted according to what it says on the bottle. Dip teats afterwards as usual. Make sure her bedding or wherever she likes to lie down is clean and dry. Vaccinate with Lysigin (that's for staph mastitis, but will help with this, too). Milk her last if you have more than one goat so as not to spread it, and wear gloves (because you can toss them and it won't be on your hands afterwards, to prevent spreading and also because you can get it, too). Be clean, clean, clean!
     
  4. hsmomof4

    hsmomof4 New Member

    3,402
    1
    0
    Oh, and she probably won't like the being sprayed very much at first, particularly if it's cold, but she will get used to it.
     
  5. dragonlair

    dragonlair Active Member

    2,614
    2
    36
    To me it looks like Staph too. I have an older Alpine doe who gets it when she freshens each year.
     
  6. MRFBarbara

    MRFBarbara Guest

    Looks like staph, I had a doe that was vaccinated and cleaned very well with chlorhedine (spelling) and it would not clear up....Old goat guy at a show told me to put kopertox on it.. the copper stuff for hooves.. I did and it was gone overnight..
     
  7. KozaGirl

    KozaGirl New Member

    108
    0
    0
    Fortunately, she's the only doe I am milking right now, so no chance of spreading to others...
    What about Goat Pox? I have read about that in my Storey's book...
    They are whitish blisters that just fill up with water.
     
  8. Ozark Lady

    Ozark Lady New Member

    397
    0
    0
    We had something that looked like that. About the same time, my children broke out with Chicken Pox.
    So, I kind of thought the two were related.
    Seems when one cleared so did the other, my children and the goats.
    But it only lasted 10 days? not a month for sure!
    Once they popped, we applied triple antibiotic to prevent infection, and we were careful about hand washing, before and after milking.
    Cleanliness, and we just had to let it run its course in our case.
    Oddly, it never spread on the goats, remained on the udders.
    My children were covered, so I took them to the doctor, he said Chicken Pox.
    We later discovered other neighbor children had it first, so my children caught it, and spread it to the goats.
     
  9. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    1
    0
    Nope it is just staph, and it's a simple coincidence that your goats had Chicken Pox at the same time the goat had staph. They start as small fluid filled blisters that if left along, which you should do nothing more to them than spray with chlorhexideen, they pop and leave these flattened out circles that go away eventually. It's the reason I intially started using Lysigin. We rarely get staph dermatitis anymore in the milkers over the winter and wet spring.

    Using Kopertox is smart to, it's copper...so think also about bolusing if that works. V
     
  10. KozaGirl

    KozaGirl New Member

    108
    0
    0
    Thanks for the link!! Interesting!!
    So, is this fairly normal? Should I beat myself up for doing something wrong? I am overly clean with my animals, and I wash her entire udder twice per day, as well as use Udder Butter, etc to keep her teats nice and soft...
     
  11. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    1
    0
    You really should nix the udder butter, first because it's just petroleum based, second because it makes a barrier between the butter and the skin that is perfect for growing staph...warm and moist. Chlorhexideen is perfect to use, it has a lotiony feel to it but is an excellent product. If you have to use something to make the udder pretty, use a very light oil, and then really the tinest of amounts or use a towel to get most of it off.
     
  12. peregrine

    peregrine New Member

    230
    0
    0
    I had a staph situation when I used dilute bleach as a pre-milk wipe, because it irritated her skin, caused dryness which opened her to staph. I now only use chlorhexidine pre-milk and then a homemade chlorhexidine spray dip for after. Also I do lysigin and haven't had a problem since. I also do not use gloves when I milk, but I wash my hands with chlorhexidine soap and a scrub brush especially around the nails prior to milking. I love nolvasan...
     
  13. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    1
    0
    Using bleach is just 1/4 cup to 1 gallon of water, and you can't use it as a prewash, it doesn't clean...bleach only disinfects clean. So wash the udder and teats with anything that cleans, then post dipping is about the teats only, which were cleaned before you milked. V
     
  14. KozaGirl

    KozaGirl New Member

    108
    0
    0
    Can staph decrease milk production? We're just about to 7 lbs a day, but still waiting for that 8 lbs we were promised..although I brought this up before.. she is only going on 4 weeks freshened, and moved the day after she freshened...
     
  15. prairie nights

    prairie nights New Member

    1,589
    0
    0
    Diana,

    staph is an infection and while it is common, it is NOT normal. There are different kinds, some are only on the skin (dermatitis), some are inside the udder effecting milk.

    I would not be using or selling milk from a doe with staph , even if it was just dermatitis since I did not have the milk tested. I would give this doe Lysigin and vaccinate all does from here on. Works like a charm. The protocol Vicki described how to keep it clean before it heals. Staph is not just rash, it can get very nasty.
     
  16. Island Creek Farm

    Island Creek Farm New Member

    336
    0
    0
    Can Lysigin be given whenever? I don't think mine were ever vaccinated with it, I really would like to use it just in case, but they are going on their second freshening. Is it given yearly, or am I too late?
     
  17. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    1
    0
    Diana, who promised you 8 pounds? When I sell milkers I do tell folks how much she gives, I weigh milk each Monday, but I also write it out on contract that with the stress of the move they should be VERY happy if she milks 1/2 that, and if you freshen her on your own property next year you will love her! I haven't had too many complaints on the amount of milk my does milk even in new homes, but some does simply stress, don't milk as well on the new feed or are picked on moving into a new home by the other does. Vicki
     
  18. Ozark Lady

    Ozark Lady New Member

    397
    0
    0
    I looked it up. It might not be a coincidence after all:

    The most common complication of chickenpox is secondary bacterial infection of the chickenpox lesions. The bacteria most likely to cause infection are Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. The bacteria most commonly cause infections such as impetigo, furunculosis, cellulitis, erysipelas, and lymphadenitis. These infections are superficial, but there is a risk of the bacteria invading the bloodstream and causing bacteremia. People who develop bacteremia are at risk of developing bacterial pneumonia, meningitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, sepsis, shock, and death. Chickenpox lesions that are secondarily infected should be treated with antibiotics.

    It is highly possible that my children had developed some staph in their lesions and transmitted these to the goats. But, kids and goats both healed up well, and with no further complications.
     
  19. KozaGirl

    KozaGirl New Member

    108
    0
    0
    Vicki~ The lady we bought her from said she was an average 8 pounder a day... but I had brought this up before about me being paranoid, impatient, etc... I think mostly I am just nervous, with her being new for us, and this is all still new to us anyway...
    You had mentioned before that I should give her at least 2 months to even speculate on her... after a move AND kidding all within 2 days... I'm sure like you said that next year on our place I will be happy with what she is giving. Considering I am getting 7 lbs a day right now, and I was only getting a quart a day with my last milker.... hahah!! I shouldn't be complaining!!!
    And her milk is SOOO SWEET TOO!!!!