Best time to CAE test?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Ravenwood, Jan 10, 2008.

  1. Ravenwood

    Ravenwood New Member

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    Hello everyone,
    I was wondering what is the most ideal time to do CAE testing? Before kidding? After freshening? When open? Or does it really matter?
    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Doesn't matter one bit. I blood test when I have time, usually after I have sold and am down to who I am keeping, say by summer. But I do send in colostrum for testing as everyone kids. Vicki
     

  3. Ravenwood

    Ravenwood New Member

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    Do you test annually, or twice/year? I've talked to a few people who test twice/year til they have so many negatives in a row, then switch to annually.

    Also, what is the cost for testing?

    I also run a herd of commercial meat does (closed herd). I've read that this disease is predominantly a dairy industry problem and only approx. 10% of meat herds are affected. Would it be worthwhile to have my meat herd tested as well?

    Thanks!
     
  4. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

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    I like to test in January. Most of my senior does will be kidding in Feb-April. This ensures me that I will catch any problem that might arise. Too, if I decide to sell a milker after kidding, I have a fresh, current test. We test annually and continue to be CAE free for nearly 14 years.
     
  5. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

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    Everyone should test for CAE. It is not just a "dairy goat" problem. I don't test more than once a year. If you can pull the blood - the cost is much cheaper - somewhere around $5 a head.
     
  6. Ravenwood

    Ravenwood New Member

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    Hello again,
    I was just regurgitating the Langston University info that "CAE, caused by a retrovirus, can affect all breeds of goats but is most common in the dairy goat industry. Up to 80% of all dairy goat herds tested have infected animals coompared with only up to 10% of meat goat herds." I agree that it is an important disease that should be tested for. That said, I honestly do not know of a single meat producer who has tested for CAE outside of the requirements for export.

    If your does come back negative are you pretty much in the clear to dam raise? I am expecting my second child and dam raising is looking pretty attractive right about now :)
     
  7. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    "regurgitating" is right :)

    IF all boer goats were tested they would know that alot more than 10% are positive, but they don't test them. Only symptomatic boers are culled. Many many more dairy goats are tested, so yes back in the day many were positive, but I would bet the farm there are more meat goats with CAE than dairy now. Especially in the top show herds of each breed.

    It's not a yes or no answer getting a CAE negative test back, yes she does not have the titer in the blood that reacts with the test, today. Will she tommorrow, we don't know.

    The only safe goat to me is the goat you raised on prevention yourself, you heat treated the colostrum and pastuerised the milk, yourself.

    But dang you do what you gotta doe, with negative tests, mama raise, then test kids before sale. Testing kids gives you a really good idea as to the real status of your does. CAE may not be present in the blood to be called positive, but it doesn't hide from the colostrum. Vicki
     
  8. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

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    Dam raising meat goats is the only way to go. The other is too much work. Test and dam raise.

    CAE really exploded on the dairy industry from pooling the milk and feeding it unpastuerized to the kids. There was no test in those days. Today in the dairy animals, many breeders pull the kids, pastuerize the milk and heat treat the colostrum. Like Vicki said, the reason there are more positive animals found in dairy animals is because more dairy owners are responsible enough to test.

    Dam raising or pastuerizing is a choice you have to make. A yearly CAE test on your dairy herd is a must. Every positive animal should be culled. To grope along hoping everybody is ok, could be a serious mistake.

    I am proud of you for taking action on CAE and beginning to test. That is being a responsible goat owner.
     
  9. Cotton Eyed Does

    Cotton Eyed Does New Member

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    Yeh, that's it exactly, they aren't counting all of them in the meat goat herds because not very many producers test. I pull blood and test all my boer goats. HA. Some of you probably laugh at me because I am the testing queen. :biggrin But I do and I think meat goat herds should test. I have called many boer breeders and when I ask if they test their goats for CAE or CL some of them get plumb indignant. If I email someone about that they just don't return my emails. The boer goat producers don't want to test because they don't want to spend the money. They think it is cost prohibitive to test them. I have had some of them act a little aggravated towards me because I do test. Probably because they feel that if this practice starts getting around it will force them to test in order to stay competative in the industry. For the ones that do not test and I am interested in one of their animals, I request to pull blood on the animal and send it off at my expense. If the animal tests negative then we have a deal and I'll come pick her up. If she tests positive then all I am out is the cost of the test. I carry needles and blood tubes in my glove box. Then I re-test yearly. I understand that it is not possible probably for herds that run hundreds of does to test everybody, but you can pick a few out of each pasture this time and do someone else next time. Eventually you would have a clean herd. If any new stock are purchased just pull blood and test at purchase before they are introduced to your existing herd. It could be done.
     
  10. goatkid

    goatkid New Member

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    Boer goats should be tested for CAE. Lots of big time Boer breeders, especially those who don't show, don't test their goats because they consider their kids a terminal product. I can see not testing meat wethers, but breeding stock should be tested.
     
  11. Melissa

    Melissa New Member

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    I'd understand if meat goat breeders only selling to the meat market didn't test, but selling breeding stock? they're just adding to the problem. when testing colostrum how do you send it in? in tubes like blood? frozen? over nighted on ice? what's the cost for colostrum testing? same as blood? who do you guys use?

    -Melissa
     
  12. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I use PAVL, info is in goatkeeping 101. LeeAnn got me some cool urine collection tubes, think red top vacutainer tube minus the glass :) So maybe 6 or 10 cc ? I just save all week and weekends colostrum and send it in each Monday. They bill you on the test $7. Make sure you know how to label bottles, and do a key sheet...Bio-tracking has a really good printable form, I am going to use for this also now. Vicki
     
  13. Kaye White

    Kaye White New Member

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    Yeah, What Vicki said!!! 1st post.
    We have several boer ladies on here that test their herds- Good for you guys!...but the biggest majority are like the ostrich- just stick their heads in the sand and don't think about it. Like using formaldahyde in abcesses.??? What about the internal ones???

    I read somewhere, where research is being done on how to *treat/manage* CL in meat goats....(where's that rolly eyes thing?) there's no treatment but death. period! What a waste of research money.
    Just my humble opinion,
    Kaye
     
  14. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Yep and they don't test for CL either and the boers is where CL came in. I just don't get it.
     
  15. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    We have known about CL for years, but like the new CAE info and testing....the bacteria in CL wasn't know about...well we knew that CL abscess contained Cornybacterium Pseudotuberculosis, we just didn't know anything about it. Figure boers were bred to anything with 4 legs walking, they weren't going to cull for extra teats let alone CL. Why they allowed their untested reciept does to raise those expensive kids is beyound me. CL is in all mammal spieces. Vicki
     
  16. Aja-Sammati

    Aja-Sammati Active Member

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    I know a breeder that makes most boer people crazy- she tests annually for CAE & CL. She also raises Alpines. I am glad to know that some breeders are responsible- we all know that you can have postives that are not symptomatic, so why cull on symptoms?
     
  17. Melissa

    Melissa New Member

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    this is partly why I'm so into AI. no contamination from the outside. I don't have CL or CAE and I want to keep it that way.

    -Melissa
     
  18. KJFarm

    KJFarm Senior Member

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    Melissa, every goat is not an AI candidate. Some goats will never breed AI, so you will have to have a buck for clean-up. You just need to buy from a clean herd, and ask to see his most recent CAE test result, or ask them to test him for you before you buy.
     
  19. Ravenwood

    Ravenwood New Member

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    My understanding is that it is not 100% safe to assume that CAE is not passed through the semen, hence the reason they require CAE tests on bucks for semen export. Am I mistaken?
     
  20. Melissa

    Melissa New Member

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    thanks Janie. I've got my buck already. got him from Doreen. I just love him. sweet, gentleman, doesn't jump fences. I will be crying the day I have to sell him because he's related to most of my does.
    Tam, I would agree that anyone looking at buck would want to purchase from CAE free herds. but you can't argue with the fact that AI GREATLY decreases your chances of CAE. and eliminates CL.

    -Melissa