Best place to keep a Buck

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by feistygoatwoman, Jul 28, 2008.

  1. feistygoatwoman

    feistygoatwoman New Member

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    Hello!! I am getting ready to get a 6 mo. old Togg Buck!!! He has champion bloodlines and is quite beautiful. I am not for sure where I am going to put him, or what he needs. I have a separate barn for him, but what kind of pasture does he need? How far should it be from the does pasture? Does he need a companion? I am not getting him until Mid-August, so I have time to get things ready for him. Any advice would be great.
     
  2. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    I never raise buck kids alone, why when I buy a buck I either grow out my own or purchase 2. I also think you should start all kids in small pens, perferably cattle panel pens that you have the panels in place securly. Mne is 50 X 80? I fill them pens with little tykes toys and things to do. This teaches them to never test your fences, they don't learn they can get out as kids, jump over, pull down fences, that way when older they will stay behind most fences. And a wether is not a companion for a buck he is a toy :) Vicki
     

  3. We use cattle panels for our bucks. Heck we use cattle panels for about everything. Lol.
     
  4. Leo

    Leo New Member

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    :yeahthat
    This will save you so many headaches when he is older. I did that with my buck and a tree will fall on the fence, crush it to the ground and he'll just hang out till I fix the fence, same with everyone else raised here. You'll worry a lot less when your buck/s/wether won't try the fences. We use field fence/hog wire, only problem we have is trees falling on our fence crushing everything, and re-stretching the wire.
    Megan
     
  5. feistygoatwoman

    feistygoatwoman New Member

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    Thanks for the advice!!! I do use 5 ft goat fencing for all my pastures/pens. I wouldn't have thought about the toys. So is getting a wether not a good idea???
     
  6. Merry Beth

    Merry Beth New Member

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    Can I add to this question and restate one?

    My husband is thinking of getting a buck because we will have to travel so far to breed our does to a Nubian. The stress of taking our does to be bred, catching it at the right time etc. is really bugging me. BUT, I've been told that a buck's odor is horrific and paying $100 stud fee and traveling 100 miles to breed the does would be worth it all. I'm not sure how this is done since we are super newbies, but I do know the stress our does experienced when we bought them and brought them home and I don't want them to have to do that again soon.

    To reask a question, how close can a buck be kept to the does without the buck odor affecting the milk?
     
  7. rg1950

    rg1950 New Member

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    Buck odor can be overwhelming. We keep our bucks on the opposite side of the property from our does. When our does are ready to be bred, we put them in for about 3 days with the buck til we know they are bred. It has not affected the milk. Then the does are in heat, they will swell, swish their tails alot, and even try and ride each other. Bucks don't stink year around, just about 6-8 or so months during the year.

    We have put wethers in with our bucks and they get along fine, but they were older wethers. Also, if you have the buck to close to the does, he will all but tear up a fence to get to her, unless you have electric wiring or really strong fencing. We had a buck tear a whole in the side of a metal barn trying to get to a doe in heat, but he is a 6 year old boer with really big horns :biggrin.

    I don't know how long a buck has to be in with the does before the milk taste "bucky", but we haven't had any problems with 3 days. We haven't gone past 3 days in our milkers.

    Tara
     
  8. Merry Beth

    Merry Beth New Member

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    Well, we only have 3 acres total (meaning total acreage) and we were thinking of maybe putting the bucks within...oh, 50 feet of the does with an empty pen between. Let me know who stupid this sounds.
     
  9. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    Sorry, but I completely disagree.

    I have 10 bucks and I don't find the smell to be overwhelming in the least. Granted, my husband finds them to be more smelly than I do.

    The buck barn is directly across from the doe barn with their fences being about 25' apart. My bucks easily stay in their fence with only the use of cattle panels. When the barns were built I planned it this way. I want to be able to easily see my does in heat... hanging on that fenceline. :)

    Wethers become 'boy toys' for bucks. Another buck as a companion is a much wiser choice.

    I also hand breed. It is completely unnecessary to have a buck breed a doe over and over. Twice works just fine. As they say... once is all it takes!

    Sara
     
  10. KJFarm

    KJFarm Senior Member

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    We use 4 X 4 hole, 5' tall panels for our goat pens. My milker pen adjoins the buck pen, so it is very easy to detect a doe in heat!! Have never had a problem with the buck odor getting into the milk. I also hand breed and take the does out after 2-3 breedings. And in the 14 years that we have been on this farm, I have never had an excape, a buck or doe tear down a fence, or had an accidental breeding. When I used to breed outside does for others, my "breeding" pen was constructed of 2 X 4, 5' tall panels. Would love it if I could afford these panels for all my pens, they are a heavier guage wire.
     
  11. Kaye White

    Kaye White Guest

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    :yeahthat I agree with Sara.
    My buck fences run along the doe pasture so I can tell absolutely when a doe is in heat. I don't have a problem with the smell affecting the milk. AND I don't keep bucks together. I've said before...I have a 5yr. old Togg buck that's never had a "buddy" and he won't. He's too expensive to risk getting injured. So far I don't "think" he needs therapy.?
    I do a lot of AI and if I get settles from one breeding with a whole lot less semen than a live cover...why would I leave a doe in the pen with a buck to breed over and over? I don't. I service the doe one time and she's put back into the doe pasture.

    Best place to keep a buck that tears up fences or barns is in a nitrogen tank! I don't put up with that crap from a 1,300# stallion, I'm sure not putting up with it from a 2-300# goat! You wouldn't put a stallion or a bull under a few strands of barbwire, so why put a rutty buck in anything but a stout built buck pen!?

    If the smell gets over whelming...then use the young buck and sell him and get another young buck. When planning your buck pen...check the wind and put him down wind of your house and barn. Wind generally blows from one direction MOST OF THE TIME.
    Kaye
     
  12. rg1950

    rg1950 New Member

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    Sara,
    I didn't mean that buck odor is overwhelming to me. It Don't bother me a bit, ;) but to someone who is not use to it, it can be overwhelming to them. Visitors to our farm often comment on it. We have 2 grown boer bucks (did have 3 until a week ago when we sold one) and 3 nubian bucks (had 4, sold one of them last week to, and 2 are kids) and I don't mind going around them.

    The goat that tore up the shed was a boer, not a nubian. This boer has also knocked holes in the sides of their wooden sheds. He also bent the fence really bad butting it trying to get through it to the does in the pasture. We had to run electric fencing to keep him in. I have never saw a nubian buck this aggressive, so the rules for housing are probably different for boers than for nubians. Our buck pen runs beside our field goat pen, but is on the opposite side from our dairy goat pen.

    In the field, we have boers, nubians and wethers. We keep 3 nubians does that were just bred for the first time about a month ago (July 2-3) in there, but they get along fine with the boer does and wethers. Regular panels would probably work for nubians, but I wouldn't use them if I was running boers with them. Boers are more aggressive. We have had to move nubians out of their pen in the past because they were mean to them, but we sold the mean boers several months ago and watch them now. If we see one being mean, we move the victim into a pen with nicer goats. We have 6 pens total, so there is a safe place for everyone. :D

    With electric wiring, we dont have to worry about them tearing down fences. We probably would not have to worry about the fences if all our stock was nubian with no boers. We are working that way, 8 sold, 4 to go!!! :D

    Tara
     
  13. Tricia

    Tricia New Member

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    My buck barn is sited between our house (about 125' upwind) and the does' barn (about 50' downwind). The view out of the buck barn is towards the does, which seems to be appreciated! They also share a fenceline. Our buck's head glands have been removed which may make him slightly less odoriferous, but right now he's delighting in his scented self (rut began in mid-July here in New England). The buck night yard is a 5' high rail fence backed by 4' goat panels. Pasture panels are only 42" high -- we may switch those out to 48" panels this fall if they're challenged.

    We have a 6' band of concrete pavers around each of the barns -- really cuts down on mud. We'll probably add a boardwalk along the most favoritely paced fenceline this fall, too.

    Our buck does have a wether of his own age for a companion. They both have pretty laid-back personalities regardless of hormones or lack thereof.

    Nice sweet milk regardless of season.

    I use to drive does for breeding services, too. It wasn't too much of a bother, and it certainly kept me on my toes as to what was going on with estrus cycles. Then I realized just how much I enjoy bucks and the opportunity to improve my herd by owning one or two rather than relying on someone else's selection.
     
  14. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    Thank you Kaye! Exactly. No way would I keep an agressive buck let alone one that tears up pens or buildings. I wouldn't be making excuses for the breed either. You are just asking for trouble in my opinion.

    A little lead can work wonders and the problem won't be passed on to someone else. ;)

    Sara
     
  15. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Member

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    I keep my bucks in pipe horse panels -- the rails are about 2" thick, and they still manage to bend them! Cattle panels were pretty easy for them to tear up after standing on them for awhile, and I don't want to have to replace them. I buy pipe panels once. The young boys are in chain link runs or the cattle panels until they are big enough not to be able to go through the pipe.

    My boys are about 15' or so from the doe pen. When I see a doe hanging around down at the bottom of the pen then I know to start watching. Our winds blow West-East, so the bucks are South :)

    Tracy
     
  16. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    I use the same thing inside my buck barn and cattle panels for outside fencing. Yep, they can bend the horse pipe panels when they get to 'playing'. :lol

    Sara
     
  17. nitrors4

    nitrors4 Guest

    If you all have picture of your setup let me know. I would love to see what other people have done. I have visited a few farms, but I would like to see more. I am always looking for good ideas.

    I posted these in another thread, but here are my plans.

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