Bent Pasterns *Pics added*

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Pairaka, Mar 11, 2008.

  1. Pairaka

    Pairaka New Member

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    I just had a doe kid with a single doeling (born hind feet first) and her front feet are bent over. I've searched the forum and found that giving BoSe and Vitamin E should help correct this, but is this all I should do? All I have is the Selenium/Vit E oral gel (technically have a vet who will give me a scrip to order some injectable, but that's still in progress), but I gave her some of that and an extra dose of Vit E.

    Do I have to work with her feet any? Give this treatment over several days? I didn't find anything other than to give supplements but it didn't say for how long.

    Thanks,

    Wendy
     
  2. ecftoggs

    ecftoggs New Member

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    Re: Bent Pasterns

    Wendy,
    We have this a couple of times a year, we used to do everything to them ... braces, vit E, cod liver oil. Now we don't do anything because they will straighten up on thier own in about the same amount of time. We assume that the reason for this condition is not enough room in the womb, since it seemed to correlate with genetic lines more than any nutritional differences.
    Tim
     

  3. Patty13637

    Patty13637 New Member

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    Re: Bent Pasterns

    If its bugging you and you do not want to wait or its really hard for the baby to get around get some foam pipe insulation for a cast , secure it with Vet wrap and check them daily. make sure they are not to tight. Within a few days they will be straight.

    Patty
     
  4. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Re: Bent Pasterns

    If they are just knuckled under doing nothing is an option. But sprung pasterns can hyper extend if you don't wrap them.

    One kid born this way does not defficency herd wide mean.

    Put with other kidding or kid difficulites and yes you need to add bo-se to your prekidding regime. The reason kids improve is because of the selenium and E in the milk, which is not present in any concentration in the colostrum. Vicki
     
  5. Pairaka

    Pairaka New Member

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    Re: Bent Pasterns

    How do I tell the difference?

    This is a kid out of a doe I bought pregnant last month. I have added BoSe to my management regime; the doe did receive the oral gel (working on getting the injectable) at three weeks before kidding. I have never experienced this sort of problem in my own goats.

    The doe in question was a FF Boer, around 2 yo; large and roomy, but it may be due to space issues even though the kid was a single.

    I apologize for posting here and not in OT since she's not a dairy goat. I didn't think about that when I posted. I was just concerned for the kid.

    -- Wendy
     
  6. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Re: Bent Pasterns

    Hey a goat is a goat and health issues go here not in OT so you did right on the posting:)
    I would wrap the legs helps them get started faster and I give the Vit E for 4 or 5 days but the BoSe only 2 or 3 days
     
  7. whimmididdle

    whimmididdle Guest

    Re: Bent Pasterns

    Wendy....it would be a good thing if you could post a very plain pic of what you're looking at.....don't know if you can.....but it would give these experts a chance to look at the severity of the problem, and give you a little better advice on how to deal with it.

    whim
     
  8. Pairaka

    Pairaka New Member

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    Re: Bent Pasterns

    Here are pics of little Macha. These were as good as I could get without someone there to hold her. Mama is pretty protective of her and she kept crawling back under her. I tried straightening her legs out and it seemed pretty painful to her; then again, I didn't try very hard. I didn't want to hurt her. But they do seem to be bending a little further than they were last night. And she seems to be getting around on her own well. She peed while I was in taking pictures and she's passing that sticky black poo. And she knows right where mom's udder is. And I have to say, she's *trying* to get up; she just can't seem to bend those little feet.

    Thank you, every one. :)

    -- Wendy

    http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b111/Pairaka/100_0190.jpg

    http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b111/Pairaka/100_0191.jpg

    http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b111/Pairaka/100_0192.jpg
     
  9. Belle

    Belle New Member

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    Judging by the pics she is trying to walk on her knees, or does she have a problem with her pasterns too? (Pasterns are the area from the top of the hoof to that bottom "joint" on the leg.) Will her legs straighten out like normal? I would follow Sondra's recommendation for the brace the BoSe and Vit E. Good luck with her!
     
  10. Pairaka

    Pairaka New Member

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    She's getting around by walking on her knees, but by gum, she keeps trying to get those feet under her. I was watching her just a little bit ago, and she got up on the tips of her hooves for a few seconds. And each time she gets up for a little longer. Mom is really encouraging her to move around. She's had her move a couple of feet outside of the kidding shed into the sun.

    She can straighten her legs out quite well; it's the pastern that's bothering her. They're knuckled under and don't want to bend into a normal position. However, they seem looser today than yesterday; and this afternoon, even, than this morning.

    I've given her two doses of BoSe gel and extra Vit E. I'll keep up the Vit E. If I need to brace her, where do I do it? At the pasterns? Should I try to extend the pasterns or just brace her knees so she can get around?

    Thanks for everyone's input! It really is appreciated! :D

    -- Wendy
     
  11. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    That isn't a normal place for this problem. Did she have a difficult birth someone pulling on her by her front legs? I would brace her. First just try vet wrap, do not put it on intially too tight. Wrap her with her knees straight and also her pasterns straight. Then using your hands smash the multiple layers forming a cast together. This will let her bend her knees some but not colapse down like this, she can stand and walk with these soft casts, but with not enough support that she won't build strength in the ligiments. Check her daily that he hooves are warm and no swelling or the bandages are to tight.

    Vet Wrap is that brightly colored rolled bandage material all feed stores carry that stick to themselves and not to the goat. Vicki
     
  12. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    Vicki the doeling was breech.
     
  13. Pairaka

    Pairaka New Member

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    Like Sondra said, she was hindfeet first.

    I'll try the bracing. I knew I should have gotten that vetwrap at the co-op today.

    I found a picture that I managed to snap that shows a better view of how she's trying to walk and how her hooves are "turned under." It's not very clear, and she's getting a little better. She's going more on the tips of her hooves now, instead of the "knuckles," and for longer periods, too.

    http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b111/Pairaka/100_0187.jpg

    -- Wendy