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After her recent combat, did she have blood and a scab there? Upon close examination, it possibly could be a scar. I have a doe who got rainrot, and it scarred. The hair will not grow back in that spot, so it is very possible.

I was looking for copper deficiency as goats need incredibly high amounts of copper -- especially black goats.

Copper deficiency will manifest as bald patches on face, fishtail tail, faded coat, and rough coat. She seems to have a fishtail and a faded coat (it starts in the hind legs where black fades to a rusty color). I cannot tell if her coat is glossy or dull.

Does she have free choice minerals? Does it include copper? Do you use dewormers? (If she needs dewormers, then she is definitely deficient in copper)

Other things to consider, would be checking for lice (sulfur deficiency), or dandruff/flakey skin (zinc or vitamin e deficiency). But, the rest of the body appears pretty good, so I doubt these other possibilities.
 

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In loose form, I provide kelp, sea salt, copper sulfate, sulfur, dolomite, calcium carbonate, baking soda, monocalcium phosphate (probably won't re-buy this one now that I got the calcium carbonate), and Fertrell Goat Nutribalancer.

Zinc and Vitamin E will be will supplied in kelp. Kelp will be the best way to get minerals; it is far more effective.

I add Fertrell mineral mix to provide the trace minerals such as cobalt, manganese, phosphorus, etc. These are not necessary to add out free choice, but the goats seem to love it so there must be something in there that they need.

Did you test your soil to know the copper levels?
 

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That's awesome that you have a local kelp producer! 🤩

For the soil being high in copper, I wonder if there is an imbalance somewhere else and what that imbalance is. 🤔

Dolomite is the antidote to too much copper. It is crucial to have dolomite out so that if they did overdose, then they can correct it how they need it.

For the baking soda, it helps with bloat -- this would be if I gave them too much grains on the milk stand, they can correct what they need when they get back to the pen. I had a bottle baby once. I accidentally overfed him with milk and he got "Floppy Kid Syndrome." It is a metabolic imbalance in the gut from being overfed. I mixed a teaspoon of baking soda with water in a syringe and put it down his throat. He cleared right up after that. Sometimes the does go forever without touching it, and sometimes they eat a lot. If they are without fresh food and have only hay, then are abruptly turned out on pasture, especially wet pasture from morning dew or after a rain, after not having fresh food for a long time, then they can bloat from the abrupt change. It is just a security measure to keep baking soda out. If your goats ignore the baking soda, that's a good thing!
 
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