Automatic Waterer

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Wendy Tinney, Oct 6, 2008.

  1. Wendy Tinney

    Wendy Tinney New Member

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    I'm in the middle of building my new barn and was wanting some opinions/thoughts of the automatic waterers. Not the automatic float valve but the ones that have a "bowl". I use one for my chickens, and it works great as long as hubby doesn't take off with hose. My fears with the goats are that they might be able to drink faster than it fills up, but Hoegger carries it in their catalog. It would be so nice not to have to worry about water, I could put it higher to keep berries out, and water would stay cooler. At least that's what I am thinking!

    Hoping someone out there has tried these. And am really hoping that they love them!

    Thanks, Wendy

    Forgot to say that the waterer box (from TSC) has a horse pictured on the front. So, it is big enough for horses to get there supply of water.
     
  2. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

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    Wendy,
    In my buck pens, I use a small rectangular plastic sheep feeder (they come in red blue and a variety of colors) and insert a Dare float valve to which I attach a water hose. The sheep feeder holds about 2 quarts of water but the float valve probably displaces a quart of water. This feeder can easily be dumped daily and cleaned. I did not like the permanent bowl type as invariably something hay, grain (from their mouth) or a goat pill gets in them on occasion and has to be cleaned out. There is no simple way to do it. Of course, it helps to have a shut off valve near by so that you can turn off the water especially for cleaning.

    I think Sara uses something much more fancier that my idea. Mine would cost about $15 all total from Jeffers.
     

  3. Rose

    Rose New Member

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    I use the dog automatic water pans that are available for about $25. Easy to dump and let it refill if it gets the occasional goat berry in it. I like to dump them at least once a week anyway.
     
  4. nitrors4

    nitrors4 Guest

    I am interested in setting these up in my new barn as well. I figured I would run pipe to each stall and then have a small hose that makes the connection so it is easy to move. I figured using ridged pipe might make things a little harder. :biggrin

    You have any pictures of your setup Sara?
     
  5. Wendy Tinney

    Wendy Tinney New Member

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    Troy, how is your barn coming along?

    Let me just say that getting the hose to hook into the waterer was not as easy as hooking it up. You have to go get extra plumbing fittings. But I do like the idea of hooking the hose and Tim's suggestion of having a shut off valve. These two put together would make for easy dumping.

    Thanks Tim and Rose for the ideas and advice! Rose, do you keep the waterer on the ground?

    Thanks again all, Wendy
     
  6. nitrors4

    nitrors4 Guest

    Barn is coming along pretty good, but never as fast as I want. Roof is on and slab is poured. Starting putting up pens, but did not get far.

    I can do all the plumbing myself so it is no big deal to need extra fittings.
     
  7. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    Trisha brings up an excellent point. Living in the frozen north, our needs are much different than those who live in the south.

    We could never get by with the bowl waterers that many of you use. Like Trisha said, no hoses in the winter... they break into pieces!

    We have several automatic, heated Ritchie waterers installed throughout our doe and buck barns. The price for what we have is $800 each plus installation (water lines below the frost line, electricity, etc.) They are labor intensive to install but so worth it in the end. My goats have warm water available 24/7. Cleaning is a snap - a shop vac does the work. :)

    All that being said, you guys in Texas don't probably don't need this. :)

    Sara
     
  8. Haglerfarm

    Haglerfarm New Member

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    I have been contemplating putting in Ritchie waterers. I can get cost-share on them. But, even if I don't I think they would be worth it.
    What size waterers, Sara, are you using? What depth are they? I am thinking of using ones with a waterer on each side and put between goat pastures.
    I have been using the low sided 50 gallon Rubbermaid troughs with the heater that screws in at the bottom. They have worked extremely well. Of course I have to keep them clean and filled with a hose. During the winter I drain the hose out after each use so they do not freeze up. The hoses do get a little stiff. But, thankfully they are usable here, especially since we don't have the winters we used to have.
    Les
     
  9. nitrors4

    nitrors4 Guest

    I am a freak so I will protect it from the cold even though our winters are pretty easy.

    I like the shopvac idea though. I have a big one that I would suck a bowling ball through a garden house. :biggrin

    Oh and I would not really use a garden hose. I think some PEX would be much better option. I like to do things one time and call it done.
     
  10. BlissBerry

    BlissBerry Guest

    Where the heck did Trisha's post go? No, I wasn't talking to myself, I swear! :biggrin

    Les, I have the 2AC model (the tall one): http://www.ritchiefount.com/acseries.html

    Mine are installed on top of a cement slab so the goats have to step up to drink. I have them between pens so 1 waterer serves 2 pens. I love them!

    Sara
     
  11. Sondra

    Sondra New Member

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    haven't a clue unless she deleted it I read her post a while ago before you came on.
     
  12. Wendy Tinney

    Wendy Tinney New Member

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    I was trying to figure out who you were talking to. Thanks for posting the link. Thankfully I won't have to go to that expense.

    Thanks Troy, will get the info to the hubby.

    Wendy
     
  13. nitrors4

    nitrors4 Guest

    1/2" PEX is pretty flexible, but considering the low gmp you could go with 3/8" which is real flexible. :biggrin