Another Look at G6S

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by Karen Bailey, Sep 19, 2008.

  1. Karen Bailey

    Karen Bailey New Member

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  2. stoneyheightsfarm

    stoneyheightsfarm New Member

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    Excellent article! One question left unanswered, tho: Were you able to get those boys to breeding age and accomplish your goals?
     

  3. Karen Bailey

    Karen Bailey New Member

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    Don't know yet. They were born the first week of June. So far they are on track, ie, beginning to get little bucky ideas, and growing well.
     
  4. LMonty

    LMonty New Member

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    nice job, Karen. you explained it well.

    Early on you mention one of the reasons you began to research further was "I wanted to know if there was anything I could do to prolong the lives of my Affected bucks, at least until they had produced doe kids."

    Reading through to the end, I couldnt find anywhere you might have found an answer to that. Did you find any interventions to help their condition? I'm curious if you located any therapies or other ideas that would help you keep their good genes. I really like the way you planned to do that but still eliminate the G6s thru testing succeeding generations.

    What are the old bloodlines that tend to have this running in them? It seems like its something people dont want to mention. I honestly dont understand why its "secret". The whole thing reminds me of Impressive and the HYPP problem.
     
  5. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    You can go to Nubian Talk on yahoogroups.com on the site they have a list of reported G6S carriers and affected animals.

    It will only run in families based upon the inbreeding of carrier animals of course. If you breed non carriers you will never have G6S. Vicki
     
  6. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Can I ask you if Gizmo is one of the affected bucks? Do you have progression photos of them taken every month or so? Vicki
     
  7. Karen Bailey

    Karen Bailey New Member

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    Thanks! :biggrin

    The sad thing is that there is nothing you can do. They break down at the cellular level. Researchers have tried "enzyme therapy" where they injected G6S into the body, but it was unsuccessful. They tried some pre-natal therapies also, but again, unsuccessful.

    The only thing I can try to do is keep them as stress-free as possible. I decided to forgo vaccinations for two reasons. One to not stress/stimulate the immune system, and two because they probably won't live that long anyway. The other thing I'm doing is to keep them on coccidia & worm prevention, and keep them on the bottle as long as they will take it.

     
  8. LMonty

    LMonty New Member

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    thanks, guys I did find the thread and its the line that I thought I had heard bandied about in the past.

    guess I'm just a bit odd about this stuff, since I think full disclosure is in any breeders long term interests. preaching to the choir here, I know. just baffles me why folks seem to think sweeping things under the carpet makes them go away. i'm probalby missing hte genes that produce the diplomacy enzyme :)

    i think in human SanFillippo that cord blood transplantation (a simple blood transfusion of umbilical cord blood from non affected individuals, containing stem cells that took root and were able to produce enzyme) did have some benefits in some patients. Not enough to consider curative and it remains experimental IIRC ( I had a pt with this some years back and remember looking up the disease and some research on it) I wonder if that was ever tried in goats? that would be a neat experiment.
     
  9. A very good article. Very informative. I'm guessing that G6S is an X-linked gene. The reason bucks would be affected while does are only carriers (unless they inherit 2 faulty X chromosomes) would be that bucks only have one X chromosome, so that is why they would always be affected when they inherit the gene. Is this true? I'm still trying to get my head around this and I'm reaching back into the cobwebs to dust off my genetics courses from college days. If this is true, then this is what would be called a lethal allele. I couldn't imagine wanting to breed one of these bucks until I read your article. What you propose might just work to save those old bloodlines for you. I wish you luck.
     
  10. Karen Bailey

    Karen Bailey New Member

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    G6S is a common garden variety Dominant- Recessive, G6S deficiency being recessive. Does and bucks can be Affected. In the case of my two Affected bucks, both parents had to have been Carriers, but they show no symptoms. Just remember the simple four-square Punnett square model. Carrier to Carrier produces 25% chance Normal, 50% chance Carrier, and 25% chance Affected.
     
  11. Caprine Beings

    Caprine Beings New Member

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    Karen what a well written piece. As Lindsey did a demonstration project on it Feb I have to make sure she reads it well. Your determination to include these lines in your herd just shows good planning in breeding and how to seclude the affected animals to certain lines. I know I am quite interested in G6S as we had a doeling that tested as a carrier, she turned out a hermie, and her sire is sire to the doeling we have now. So once she is tested and turns up a carrier then I will go back to the breeders and do a test on the sire to rule him out. The dams were different and no longer there. So the results of that should be interesting. Please keep us informed on your research as it is very informative and can help others realize that G6S is not the doom in their herd they all think it is. Yes it is unfortunate for your boys though. I pray they get to serve their purpose for the amount of time they have. Wishing you the best of luck. Tammy
     
  12. Karen Bailey

    Karen Bailey New Member

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    My husband calls them the Mayflies for their expected short lifespan. :(
     
  13. minigi

    minigi New Member

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    Is this a process that only affects Nubians or other goat breeds as well? Thank you.
     
  14. Caprine Beings

    Caprine Beings New Member

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  15. Leo

    Leo New Member

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    Thank you for posting such a well researched and informative article!

    I do hope you get some really nice girls out of your boys before they burn out :(.
    Megan
     
  16. It took me a while to get back to this, but I do want to congratulate you on a well written and informative article. Garden variety receccive gene eh? I think I got it. Soooo, then a heterozygous individual mated to a dominant homozygous individual will give us 25% heterozygous individuals (carriers) to 75% dominant homozygous offspring who do not carry the gene. Correct?

    If it were an x-linked gene then half the male offspring would be affected (the gene would be expressed as the diseased state since males only have one x chromosome) and half of them would not have the gene.


    I like the odds better with the common gargen var. dominant/recessive scheme.
     
  17. Karen Bailey

    Karen Bailey New Member

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    If GG is Normal, Gg is Carrier, and gg is Affected, then if we bred Carriers only to a Normal, then we would have 50% chance of Normals(GG) and 50% Carriers(Gg), but no Affected individuals. A Carrier bred to another Carrier would produce 25% chance of Normal(GG), 50% chance of Carriers (Gg) and 25% chance of Affected (gg). 75% would give the appearance of being normal, but in actuality only 25% really are.

    I don't really like using the percentages because as goat breeders we are not breeding hundreds and hundreds of animals, which would eventually fall into the predicted percentages, but we are breeding small numbers where any of the possibilities will usually show up. Using the model of the X and Y chromosomes and knowing that there is a 50% chance for a boy, and 50% chance for a girl, how many families do we all know that have all boys or all girls born to that family? There may be an equal chance for either one, but in actual situations, it doesn't always come out even.
     
  18. hmmmm. ok. As I stated. I'm reaching far back into my brain for the genetics courses I had in college. :blush2
     
  19. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

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    Karen did you get any feedback at all from posting this to Nubian Talk? I was wondering if you would want to send this to INBA so it can be put into the newsletter? Vicki