RETAINED PLACENTA...

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by BearpawART, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. BearpawART

    BearpawART New Member

    2
    0
    0
    I have a doe that retained placenta from a birth last Wednesday....

    I flushed her for two days, and (per vet instructions), have been giving Lute every other day, banamine every day, and of course anti-biotics (naxel)

    I plan on continuing the anti-biotics for another week, but my question is, how long should I continue w/ the Lute and banamine? I've heard too much banamine can damage kidneys and I'm not sure the long term affect of giving lute every other day - so any info would be appreciated... I don't want to stop treatment too soon either and risk losing her...The vet said I could stop - but I don't necessarily trust him - he also told me last year not to flush a doe and I lost her - I flushed this one out against his advice per the info on the boards - vets are great, but not as great as those w/ all the experience that a long term breeder has - so any info you can offer would be great :D

    Thanks much!

    Lisa Carter
    WA
     
  2. buckrun

    buckrun New Member

    4,246
    0
    0
    Woah!!!!
    Banamine is a muscle relaxer- you want her contracting. You should not be giving banamine with out a completed cleanout. You should be giving her some oxytocin for contractions.

    Since you have luted her go in and sweep the uterus - both horns- manually and see what is in there.
    Do not pull on anything but go in and see if there actually is attachment to the wall.
    If she is open she should be shedding- is she contracting? I am surprised you were not told to give oxytocin even before the lute while she was still open from the original birthing and this may be the reason she has not shed anything. No contractions?

    Go in and see what is there.
    Give her a dose of oxy and quit with the lute until you have swept manually to see what is there.
    Give us an update once you examine.
    Lee
     

  3. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    0
    0
    Lutelyse doesn't work the way your vet is having you give it. He gave you a perscription for lute and gave you those directions, or was this on the phone and he said oxytocin? Vicki
     
  4. tlcnubians

    tlcnubians New Member

    722
    0
    0
    Are you sure she has a retained placenta and didn't pass it and eat it when you weren't looking?

    Retained placentas in goats aren't the serious "must pass within a certain amount of time or the animal will die" emergency that they are in other animals. We've always taken a pretty casual approach to the passing of placentas . . . if we find them, we bury them in the compost pile, if we don't, we don't worry about it.
     
  5. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho New Member

    829
    0
    0
    Is this placenta hanging out, or you are just thinking it is retained because you haven't seen it? My guess is that she probably dropped and ate it long ago - unless you actually have it hanging out of course.
     
  6. buckrun

    buckrun New Member

    4,246
    0
    0
    Yes- that is why you do a sweep.
     
  7. Bella Star

    Bella Star New Member

    1,273
    0
    0
    We have one dog that cleans up every trace of where the doe kidded spot,including the placenta,cleaning mama and kid's.
    I dont worry too much about it unless there was a problem with kidding.
     
  8. Anita Martin

    Anita Martin Senior Member

    2,792
    0
    0
    I rarely see my does placentas unless they drop them right away. Mostly they drop them when I take the kids to the house and have consumed them by the time I get back to her.
     
  9. MF-Alpines

    MF-Alpines New Member

    5,133
    0
    0
    Why do you take the kids to the house? Sorry to go OT, but I just don't understand when some of you (not just you, Anita) take kids to the house?
     
  10. fmg

    fmg New Member

    3,236
    0
    0
    I take mine to the house because they are wet when they're born, and it is usually cold when they are born, and it's easier to keep them warm and dry them off if I take them in-heat lamps really freak me out. Mine stay inside for the first day only...because it is more convenient for me to feed them frequently. The first time I bottle-raised the kids, I tried to keep them in the barn, and the kids and moms would not stop crying for each other...mostly the moms. It was much more stressful on the does than taking them to a place out of sight and sound.
     
  11. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    0
    0
    My barn is monitored, I do not want to wake up the whole barn in the middle of the night for colostrum feedings, and then go back to bed and have to listen to everyone settle down again. My kids born that day spend the first night until 10 am chores in the soap room, then it's right back out into the barn. Vicki
     
  12. smithurmonds

    smithurmonds New Member

    991
    0
    0
    Vicki, at how many days old do they go all night without a feeding?
     
  13. doublebowgoats

    doublebowgoats New Member

    3,614
    0
    0
    I'm not Vicki :) but as soon as my babies take a 20oz bottle all at once, they go eight hours between feedings.
     
  14. hsmomof4

    hsmomof4 New Member

    3,402
    0
    0
    If my babies are born very late/early, they will get a middle of the night first colostrum bottle, just because that's when it's ready, but otherwise, I don't ordinarily get up in the middle of the night for bottles. I will feed the last one very late (around midnight) and the next one pretty early (6 or 7), but nothing in the middle of the night for ordinary, healthy kids.
     
  15. smithurmonds

    smithurmonds New Member

    991
    0
    0
    In the past I have pulled my kids at 3 days and diligently make sure they are filling their bellies with colostrum that first 24 hours. That way they have it ad lib. But I have a doe whose kids I will pull right away this freshening as she bonds too strongly with them and in short order. If she has them 3 days I'll be in for weeks of constant yelling.
     
  16. SecoCreek

    SecoCreek New Member

    132
    0
    0
    I don't wake up in the middle of the night to bottle feed kids. When they are very young (1 week and under) they are fed 4 times daily. The latest feeding is around 10:30 PM. They get fed again in the morning when I get up to milk, around 5:00. My kids have always been growthy. My early February babies weigh about 45 pounds.
     
  17. NubianSoaps.com

    NubianSoaps.com New Member

    16,497
    0
    0
    I don't have a normal schedule like most, I go to bed about 2am and my alarm goes off at 9:30am. We also have very high multiples here, more so in our mini lamanchas but we routienly have quads out of 2nd fresheners, and triplets out of 12 month FF, and those little ones can't go 8 hours without something in their tummy...so until they are old enough to go on a lambar which is full at night (about 3 days old), I get up...and would rather drag out in my PJ's into my soaproom (which is in my house) than treck across the wet grass to feed kids and wake up the barn at 5 am.


    Most of my kids, all but one doe this year, kid about 3 or 4 in the afternoon, this gives me enough time to make sure they have gotten their ounce per pound of colostrum but certainly not enough time for each to have drank their whole 20 ounce bottle. And yes colostrum is that important to loose sleep over. Vicki
     
  18. MF-Alpines

    MF-Alpines New Member

    5,133
    0
    0
    The first 24 hours I feed round the clock. After that, it's 4x/day, last feeding at 10pm, first feeding at 6am. Within a week, usually, I'm down to 3x/day.
     
  19. tlcnubians

    tlcnubians New Member

    722
    0
    0
    The beauty of raising dairy goat babies is that they're fairly adaptable to whatever schedule you put them on. I visited a Nubian breeder's farm this past Saturday where the owner feeds first colostrum out of a bottle and then puts the kids all together in a big pen in the barn with a lamb bar in the middle which is kept full of cold milk. One lambar, probably 20 or more babies. All born within the last week, all nursing on the lamb bar whenever they wanted to and all doing quite well. I was kind of taken aback when I saw it, but the kids appeared to be perfectly okay with the arrangement, even the little doeling that was only a day old.

    We always bring our kids into the house when they're first born. The first babies of the year usually stay in the house a lot longer than the last ones! Of course, by the time the last babies are born it's a lot warmer outside than it is in January and February.
     
  20. MF-Alpines

    MF-Alpines New Member

    5,133
    0
    0
    And you're in Texas! Imagine how cold it is here in January and February. That's why I don't breed anyone to kid any earlier than March. And our excessive use of heat lamps!!