New here... how soon to drink milk?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by kaymiller2, May 22, 2010.

  1. kaymiller2

    kaymiller2 New Member

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    My Alpine just kidded on 5/18. She has 2 bucks. I am wondering how soon I can drink her milk? I've heard from 3 days to 4 weeks! Is the colostrum unsafe? or is it purely a matter of taste? just wondering...

    Also, The one side was 'way full, I never see the kids sucking from it, so I milked it out (looked uncomfortable!) and got nearly 1 quart from it. (3 days after freshening) I noticed some dried blood/goo from birthing on it (the teat) the day after she kidded, could that have made the kids avoid it? or what? When I milked it, there was no stringy/lumpy/bloody stuff at all. Temp seems normal...
     
  2. faithfarm

    faithfarm New Member

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    I am new to this group as well but not new to goats.

    It really depends on the goat. I have been told that colostrum is only in the milk a few days after kidding but we have one Nigerian doe who's milk tastes something awful for the first 4 weeks, after that it is like drinking sweet cream!

    Now on the other hand we have a La Mancha whose milk tastes "normal" after only a few days, so like I said it just depends on the goat. Colostrum is actually highly nutritious it just tastes terrible!

    Blessings,
    Hope
     

  3. kaymiller2

    kaymiller2 New Member

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    Thanks! After waiting for 5 months for some milk, its really hard to wait any longer to at least try the milk! :D
     
  4. buckrun

    buckrun New Member

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    You should be keeping the doe clean for many reasons and not letting the side that is not nursed stretch out and become strutted with milk. Under no circumstances should you ever go 3 days without milking.You are risking bacterial problems and permanently lopsided udder. Milk completely out at least 2 times a day and teach the kids to use the other side. They normally will find which side has the fastest stream flow since mom will only stand for so long and this is normal but if you plan to dam raise you need to force them to use both sides at first. Yes they will avoid dirty teats even when hungry so provide plenty of clean bedding and clean off all lochia for the 2 weeks after kidding that it normally flows. In extreme cases you may need to use tape on the side they favor to make them use the other side. Any cloth medical tape will do it does not have to be a special product. Remember when you tape to then milk out the side you have kept them from nursing. This will help balance the udder and when they are older they can take all production that you leave for them.


    Welcome Kay

    Lee
     
  5. prairie nights

    prairie nights New Member

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    We drink all our goats milk 48 hours after kidding. THe colostrum is extremely valuable for the babies, they need it for immunity.
    Colostrum is thick and yellow, so not like milk.

    Jana
     
  6. hsmomof4

    hsmomof4 New Member

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    We drink the milk starting at 1 week. And then everything that Lee said. :)
     
  7. kaymiller2

    kaymiller2 New Member

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    OK, this evening, (after milking the 'ignored' side twice) - it was equally full. I think they are sucking both sides, now. The doe is clean - there was just some gunk on there that one day. (I've been washing her, and she has clean bedding/stall) I guess I read too much websites/books that said "don't milk for the first two weeks - let the babies only on her" that I understood that I shouldn't start milking at all till the second (or more) week. (I knew that you shouldn't start-then quit abruptly!)Today I did milk both sides out am/pm. Thanks for the advice! I need all I can get! :lol
    I am getting the feeling that WHEN to start drinking it is up to each persons taste! :biggrin
     
  8. buckrun

    buckrun New Member

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    Most dairy does will produce far more than newborn kids can drink immediately.
    We often milk off a full gallon more than young kids consume.
    It is best to assume that the babies cannot take care of things and get them up on the stanchion twice a day regardless just to check udder health and production levels.

    The flavor of milk in early lactation is dependent on the individual goat. We freeze excess colostrum and begin using milk at 3 days but not for cheese until a full week has passed to assure proper function of cultures and rennet. Best luck with your new milk maker.
     
  9. doublebowgoats

    doublebowgoats New Member

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    Glad she's evening out for you. As far as all the information out in books and on the web, I'll say for every "truth" out there about goats, there is usually a completely opposite "truth" from some other book or website. That's why it's so good to have an actual experienced person to help you. And that's what this forum is all about. Welcome, By the way!
     
  10. Ozark Lady

    Ozark Lady New Member

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    I normally milk and freeze excess colostrum, with day on it, like day 1, day 2, after day 3. I am building up excess. I like to keep at least a two day supply ahead of the kids in the fridge. I have had too many times, that something happened, an injury to udder, etc, and the milk was down for a day or two. So, I make sure I have my 3-4 gallons ahead before using any milk for humans. Also, I watch my withdrawals on wormers etc.

    One year, I found an abandoned new born deer on the highway. It was almost starved! I was sure glad that I had the extra colostrum and the extra milk since I gained an extra mouth that day. He lived and grew well, and then moved to a petting zoo, since he was so tame.

    But, you can also sometimes find that goats need help too. You can put in a request at the vet's office and rescue baby goats, or deer, that lost their moms. So, I try to stay ahead, but not too far ahead.
     
  11. ilovetodig

    ilovetodig ilovemygoats

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    I have not had good luck freezing excess milk for drinking later. When it thaws it is grainy and separated. Is there a trick to get it to have the normal texture after it thaws?
     
  12. fmg

    fmg New Member

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    Note: This thread is almost 4 years old.

    The best way to get milk to freeze and thaw well, is to freeze it immediately after milking. And putting warm milk in the freezer may not chill it quick enough, so getting it chilled down first, may help too. I always chill mine first anyway, so the milk I am freezing is already cold.