Castration - Did I do it right?

Discussion in 'Dairy Goat Info' started by swgoats, May 18, 2013.

  1. swgoats

    swgoats New Member

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    I did my first castration today, and I'm looking for feedback. I was taught by the vet, read about it on here, and had my husband help who has done piglets years ago. So I cut through the sack and popped out the testicles just fine, but when I tried to jerk them, I couldn't get them to come away. I couldn't really find an obvious cord, so I just sawed away far from the ball part. What came away looked like an intact testicle. My husband said I did it right. There was some bleeding. It seemed to me the bleeding was coming from the cords which I never got a good look at. it would fill the sack and the where the sack had clotted would open back out. My husband said it was not too much bleeding, and that some bleed more than others. But there continues to be a little bit of blood on the straw or on his legs. Am I just being a nervous Nelly or is there something I could have done better? He was two weeks old. I meant to do it at a week old, but he was so tiny I didn't think it would hurt to wait.
     
  2. fmg

    fmg New Member

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    I helped a friend with some older kids that had testicles too big to fit in the bander (a couple of them fit if we squeezed 1 through first, then the other, but some were too big for that too). I did the cutting, and she held the kids. When I got the bottom of the scrotum off, I pulled out one testicle at a time, and used both hands to stretch the cords in opposite directions, repeat on other side. There was minimal bleeding because the vessels are stretched that way, and we would have known if they bled a lot-they were white saanens. ;)
     

  3. Horsehair Braider

    Horsehair Braider New Member

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    For next time... *don't wait*.

    When you pull the testicle, put your hand against the goat and pull. It's the stretching and pulling breaking the cord that results in no blood. If you cut it, you will get some blood but he will be fine, so don't worry - but the stretching and snapping makes the blood vessels seal up so you don't have blood.

    Also by pulling you will make SURE that you got everything. If you leave bits behind it can cause behavioural issues. He will act like a buck but not be able to breed. The reason most people wether is because they do not like the buck behaviour. In horses they call it "proud cut" and it can be problematic.

    It's hard to say if you got everything, but next time, do it younger and pull the testical out, don't cut it. It is much safer for the goat if you pull. Time will tell on this one but in the meantime don't worry, it does not sound like he will bleed to death. If there is a lot of blood, the goat will also be depressed and stop eating and so on. I think yours will be fine.
     
  4. jasonmtapia

    jasonmtapia New Member

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    I agree with Jacquee'. Pull don't cut. I have read (never had to do it) if you have to cut use the back dull side of the scalpel to go through cords. Should not be much blood if done that way. Oh and sometimes it feels like those cords go clear up to their necks!
     
  5. swgoats

    swgoats New Member

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    Thanks everyone! I think he's ok. He went back with mom and has been up and down, nursing, no more bleeding.

    So when you pull is it supposed to break easily or is it sort of tough? I will do it sooner next time, and remember the back of the scalpel thing if I need it. I think I was just being a nervous nelly about it. I really do think I got the whole testicle cause they looked like little eggs - but we'll see I guess. Looking forward to when this new procedure is old hat :)
     
  6. Horsehair Braider

    Horsehair Braider New Member

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    Yes, you need to pull hard. Hold your other hand down on the scrotum and support the goat, and PULL. You are not just pulling out the testicle but also a little tiny gland that you will have a very hard time seeing. (Epididymus.) (At least, on a very young goat it's so small it's hard to see, not that it's microscopic or something.) The way it will feel is at first it will be hard to pull, then it will get easy and feel very stretchy, and then it will snap. It takes about one second. Don't let my long description make you think it takes a long time or is at all difficult.
     
  7. Tim Pruitt

    Tim Pruitt New Member

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    DON'T CUT! Unless you are going to tie. They can bleed to death or at least go into shock. The pulling stretches the cord and constricts the blood vessels so they won't bleed to death
     
  8. swgoats

    swgoats New Member

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    I did get the gland. I thought it was fat, lol. But it did look like a gland. Ok, I was just being wimpy. I'll toughen up and pull harder next time!
     
  9. fmg

    fmg New Member

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    How could you not get the epididymis? It is attached to the side of the testicle. I don't think it's a gland really, it is basically the beginning of the spermatic cords. I don't remember it secreting anything (well, unless you count semen, but it doesn't make any part of the semen, so I dunno), and I think you have to secrete something to be a gland.
     
  10. Horsehair Braider

    Horsehair Braider New Member

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    I'm sorry, I should not have used the word "gland". I was very tired when I posted and it was the only word I could think of.

    She said she cut. How can one possibly know where she cut? Unless one is there to see? When my vet castrates a horse, he displays the item removed for me, and points out all the parts, so that I know nothing is left. If you leave bits in there, it causes trouble and it's where the "proud cut" phrase came from. All I can tell you is, don't leave parts behind. Remove everything, and the best way to do it on a goat is to pull.
     
  11. swgoats

    swgoats New Member

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    No sweat, there were some little fatty, glandy type bits - I was assuming that's what you were talking about.
     
  12. fmg

    fmg New Member

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    Maybe a horses epididymis is detached?

    I meant no offense, just trying to help with some anatomy "technicalities". It is like when people call lymph nodes "lymph glands", just a little pet peeve of mine. ;)
     
  13. buckrun

    buckrun New Member

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    Last edited: May 22, 2013
  14. fmg

    fmg New Member

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    Yep. .
     
  15. swgoats

    swgoats New Member

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    The second go round went much easier. Even though I felt like I was ripping his guts out, I toughed it out and managed to rip them, and there was no bleeding to mention. I do think it hurts them pretty badly though. I don't like that. I know they get over it pretty quickly, but in the short term, I'm feeling badly for them. :(
     
  16. Horsehair Braider

    Horsehair Braider New Member

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    What age was the kid? On mine, I do them at 5 days to a week. What I find they are objecting to is being restrained. They carry on (no matter what I am doing) until I let them go. They are generally fine after that. But, very good news about no blood. I think that's important to their welfare.
     
  17. swgoats

    swgoats New Member

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    Well, I meant to do it at a week, but life got in the way and the kid was two weeks. He just seemed to be in pain afterwards - breathing hard, but settled down within a few minutes. Then they rest, which I figure is a good thing. I'm probably putting human emotion into it. It just seems like a big deal to have someone remove a body part without any kind of pain relief. I need to get it done sooner. I'm just trying to coordinate with my husband cause I feel like I need him for moral support and to hold the kid.
     
  18. Horsehair Braider

    Horsehair Braider New Member

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    Hmm, yeah, that might be getting towards a little old for that method. The young kids run over to their mother and nurse and hey, presto - it's over.

    I sit on the ground and will use my legs and arms in creative ways to pin the kid still, leaving both hands free to work. I sort of tuck the head and forelegs up under my left arm and pin the hind legs with my legs. This is what really bugs them, as I am holding them very still. But that way, I can do it myself and don't have to rely on someone else being there. I prefer this, as I can then do it when it's right for the goat. You are lucky your husband will help you! Mine would not!
     
  19. fmg

    fmg New Member

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    You could try giving them a shot of Banamine about 15 mins before. It's still going to hurt, but maybe it will help them feel better faster.