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Old 02-06-2013, 03:06 PM   #1
LostCreek
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Default Heat Treating Milk/Colostrum Question

I get why someone would heat treat milk/colostrum before freezing it or bottle feeding kids. I haven't heat treated any milk/colostrum, yet (unless I was making cheese). I did try to heat treat some colostrum yesterday.

I posted yesterday about a goat with a very full udder. I asked everyone about their experiences with full udders, and how close we might be getting to kidding. Lots of GREAT replies! (and she freshened yesterday afternoon)

Vicki suggested milking her before she delivered which would give me time to heat treat the colostrum. I would never have thought of milking the doe before she'd delivered. I guess, in my mind, there's a colostrum clock ticking as soon as those babies are born. The doe is only going to make that super-charged colostrum for so long. I'm still relatively new to goats, and am still learning. Vicki is one who's opinion I trust and respect on anything goat related!

So, after the kids had gotten up and had their first couple of shots of colostrum, I milked her down. I got about a half-gallon of good yellow colostrum. I brought it in, poured it into a pot, put it on the stove on high, and went to stirring. I figured that, just like making cheese, 180 degrees is the magic number--it's where the milk starts to come alive....right? I mean, I've made more than a couple of batches of cheese. After the first several batches using the thermometer, I realized that it was right at 180 degrees that the milk seemed to boil up the sides of the pot. So consistent was this, that I quit using the thermometer. Started just boiling the milk until it hit that magic number and came to life, then remove it from the heat, keep stirring, and add the apple cider vinegar slowly. Something VERY Different happened with this colostrum. As SOON as it hit that magic number and started to boil up the sides of the pot, I moved the pot from the stove and noticed that it had already began to curdle. As I stirred, it curdled before my eyes, and kept curdling until nearly all the milk had curdled, and left hardly any whey. Seriously surprised me!!

Has this ever happened to anyone else? Anyone know (or have a guess) how or why this happened? How do you heat treat your colostrum?

I mean, I don't waste much of anything around here. The hogs sure didn't complain about having it! And I know it had to have been GREAT for them! Heck, I was kinda tempted to try it!

Thanks, in advance for sharing your experiences with heat treating milk/colostrum.

Daniel



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Old 02-06-2013, 03:18 PM   #2
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Default Re: Heat Treating Milk/Colostrum Question

When heat treating colostrum it needs to be brought up to 135 degrees and held there for an hour. Do this in a double boiler, not directly on the stove burner. It needs to be stirred often or it will become pudding.



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Old 02-06-2013, 03:34 PM   #3
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Default Re: Heat Treating Milk/Colostrum Question

Lesson Learned.

Thanks for your reply, Goat Town! Is it the same 135 degrees to heat treat milk, then? and the same hour?

It's funny. When it did that, my partner Chris (a chef) said, "it turned straight into pudding!" I thought it looked more like early cheese, but I have absolutely zero kitchen credit. LOL

Thanks, again!!
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Old 02-06-2013, 03:37 PM   #4
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Default Re: Heat Treating Milk/Colostrum Question

Pasteuring milk is different. You can heat it to 145 degrees and keep it there an hour. You canb also heat it to 165 degrees (what I do) and then hold it there for 15 seconds.

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Old 02-06-2013, 03:49 PM   #5
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Default Re: Heat Treating Milk/Colostrum Question

Yeah. I think I'll do the 165 degrees for 15 seconds...don't think I can trust myself to stay focused enough to keep it at 145 degrees for an hour. I'm kinda spacey sometimes. No more often than I have colostrum, I can manage heat treating it slowly.

Thanks, again!

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Old 02-06-2013, 04:01 PM   #6
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Default Re: Heat Treating Milk/Colostrum Question

You have to treat the milk different from the colostrum, for sure. Congrats on your new babies!

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Old 02-06-2013, 04:05 PM   #7
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Default Re: Heat Treating Milk/Colostrum Question

Thanks! They're so cute!

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Old 02-06-2013, 05:32 PM   #8
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Default Re: Heat Treating Milk/Colostrum Question

An easy way to do colostrum is to get a GOOD thermos (I like the Stanley metal ones) that will hold heat for a while. Preheat the thermos by filling it with very hot water (at least as hot as you want your colostrum to stay) and close it up. Then heat your colostrum on the stove in your double boiler until it comes to 135. Once it hits 135, turn off the heat, empty the warm water out of your thermos and put the colostrum in there, seal it up, and let it sit for an hour. Done! You may need more than one thermos if you have a lot of colostrum, but for me, this is the best way to do it without having to babysit the colostrum. I have a tendency to get distracted and this way, I'm not ruining my colostrum by forgetting it for a few minutes and turning it into colostrum pudding.

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Old 02-06-2013, 05:56 PM   #9
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Default Re: Heat Treating Milk/Colostrum Question

GREAT Idea!!

Thank You!

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Old 02-06-2013, 06:41 PM   #10
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Default Re: Heat Treating Milk/Colostrum Question

There is no reason to heat treat the colostrum or pasteurize the milk if you are going to let the kids nurse off mom anyway. Is your doe herd tested negative via an Elissa test for CAE? That is the only reason we heat treat and pasteurize kids, is to stop the spread of disease from dam to kid via the colostrum and secondary the milk. It has nothing to do with freezing it for future use, since my herd is negative and long been negative, I feed raw colostrum and raw milk, and freeze both. Vicki



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